Recipe Sifter

X
  • Start Here
    • Course
    • Main Ingredient
    • Cuisine
    • Preparation
    • Occasion
    • Diet
    • Nutrition
1

Select () or exclude () categories to narrow your recipe search.

2

As you select categories, the number of matching recipes will update.

Make some selections to begin narrowing your results.
  • Calories
  • Amount per serving
    1. Total Fat
    2. Saturated Fat
    3. Polyunsat. Fat
    4. Monounsat. Fat
    5. Trans Fat
  • Cholesterol
  • Sodium
  • Potassium
  • Total Carbohydrates
    1. Dietary Fiber
    2. Sugars
  • Protein
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin B6
  • Vitamin B12
  • Vitamin C
  • Calcium
  • Iron
  • Vitamin E
  • Magnesium
  • Alcohol
  • Caffeine
  • Find exactly what you're looking for with the web's most powerful recipe filtering tool.

    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / Take Time for Tea
    Lost? Site Map

    72 recipes in

    Take Time for Tea

    In here you will find tea recipes I have posted along with recipes using tea!
    « Previous 1 2 3 4 Next »
    Displaying up to 20 pages of results. To see all results, or register.

    This is more of a technique than a recipe. I adapted this from the Food Network. this would be great using mint or herb teas!

    Recipe #188113

    This description is from Back to Eden, a book written early this century. I do not mean to offend anybody, just quoting what the book says. "It has been said American people would do well if they would use sage instead of tea and coffee. The Chinese make fun of the American people because they buy the expensive tea for their drink and pay a big price for it, while the Chinese buy sage from America for a small price and drink that for their tea, which is a most wonderful remedy. The Chinese know that the sage tea will keep them well, while the tea that we buy from the Chinese makes us sick, is a cause of great nervousness and one of the causes of insanity. Sage tea is very soothing to the nerves, good for stomach troubles, gas, makes an excellent gargle for the throat, will expel worms, stop bleeding of wounds, good for liver and kidney troubles, a good wash for wounds, good hair tonic, fever reducer, and good for circulation. This tea should not be boiled, just steeped." Information came from Back To Eden by Jethro Kloss.

    Recipe #132042

    This mocktail can be made with freshly squeezed juice from a pomegranate or by using Pomegranate Juice. To juice the pomegranate, cut it in half (as you would a grapefruit) and juice using a citrus reamer or a juicer. Pour mixture through a cheesecloth-lined strainer or sieve. One large pomegranate will produce about 1/2 cup of juice. I got this from a pomegranate site.

    Recipe #194202

    A lovely way to have iced tea! Adapted from Everyday Italian. Take this to a picnic, or just take it out to the front porch!

    Recipe #178833

    I got a kick out of this and thought you might too. Boiling water is essential to many recipes. If you have never cooked before, don't worry. It is not as difficult as it may appear. This recipe will guide you through the process, even if you have never set foot in a kitchen. Adapted from Serious Eats. Submitted by Adam Kuban. Thanks Adam!

    Recipe #445229

    Just saw this being made on Aarti's Party-new top chef winner! Had to share :)

    Recipe #437153

    In this region, the tea is always served sweet. Adjust the sweetness to your liking.

    Recipe #171615

    In Mexico, or Spain for that matter, garlic tea is served up for coughs or colds. People swear by it! The garlic oils inhibit cough and cold microbes, and they are effective decongestants. Lemon juice reduces and thins mucus, which makes it easier to unclog a stuffed up respiratory system. Lemon juice also changes the body's pH, making it less hospitable to viruses and bacteria. Adapted from Prevention magazine.

    Recipe #139436

    I hear that the French sip this tea for pure pleasure, but it is also soothingly healing for sore throats, upper respiratory troubles, and tummy bugs. This recipe calls for only one herbal ingredient, and you probably have it in your kitchen pantry. As you sip your drink, take a moment to think of cozy French farmhouses surrounded by fields just beginning to thaw after the long cold winter. Oh, for the simple life..... French Tart, I am thinking of you! Adapted from Cait Johnson, Assistant Producer, Care2 Healthy Living Channels.

    Recipe #277520

    This delicious recipes comes from the U.S.Apple Growers Consumers Association in Conneticut.

    Recipe #221015

    This is a great tea to drink after dinner, before bedtime. Chamomile tea has soothing, calming and relaxing properties. It helps digestion, coughs, colds, poor skin, and is used as a liver tonic. Adapted from Herbal Teas.

    Recipe #190742

    I found this in Southern Living (March 2004). A pretty, and tasty punch! Cook time is steeping time.

    Recipe #120684

    Lemongrass and ginger infuse this lightly sweetened, refreshing iced tea with subtle flavor. From about.com.

    Recipe #501807

    From Food & Wine magazine, here's what they say: I doubt Mark Wahlberg ate this macaroni salad to get into such sick shape to play champion boxer Micky Ward in his film The Fighter. But thanks to his brother, chef Paul Wahlberg, we’ve got the recipe for the Wahlberg family macaroni salad. Mark says that no one makes the dish as well as their mother, Alma. But you can try by making their recipe for yourself! Or go to Paul’s cool new Mediterranean-Italian restaurant, Alma Nove in Hingham, Massachusetts, where the macaroni salad is on his menu at his brother’s request. At least in pasta salad season in summer. I have tweeked this just a little. Feel free to add olives, more veggies, etc. Enjoy!

    Recipe #447387

    This tea is perfect on a cold winter night and a nice alternative to hot chocolate or alcoholic drinks. Adapted from the Heart & Stroke Foundation.

    Recipe #348491

    This is a curative formula traditionally used in Chinese households as a specific remedy for curing colds, flu, and other bronchial ailments of the "cold" type.(This phrase denotes those bronchial ailments accompanied by chills rather than fever. Since the tea is a warming yang formula, it should not be used for colds accompanied by fever.) It is also an effective therapy for "stomach colds" accompanied by diarrhea, for nausea and motion sickness, and for chronically cold hands and feet. Adapted from A Spoonful of Ginger: Irresistible Health-Giving Recipes from Asian Kitchens by Nina Simonds.

    Recipe #119436

    Lavender is a tonic that has been use to prevent fainting and helps prevent nausea. Chamomile has soothing, relaxing properties. Together, they make a lovely tea!

    Recipe #190699

    Any southerner knows, there's nothing more refreshing than a glass of tea. Fresh mint sprigs are steeped to create the soothing taste of Mint Tea Punch! Enjoy! Adapted from Southern Living (March 2004)

    Recipe #125670

    I was born in Tampa, so this recipe attracted me right away. The tea has orange and lime juice added to make it tastier and healthier! Enjoy! Adpted from The Vegan Chef.

    Recipe #460188

    According to Gourmet magazine, this tea soothes and refreshes after a big meal. This was taken from a Korean menu. Brew a pot whenever you feel a little under the weather. Nibbling on the pine nuts as you sip the hot tea helps soften it's strong flavors.

    Recipe #359495

    « Previous 1 2 3 4 Next »
    Displaying up to 20 pages of results. To see all results, or register.
    Advertisement

    Looking For More?

    pic of Beef Stroganoff

    Beef Stroganoff

    By M Messer

    41 Reviews

    pic of Chicken Marsala

    Chicken Marsala

    By Kathie O

    145 Reviews

    More cookbooks from Sharon123:

    Free Weekly Newsletter

    Get the latest recipes and tips delivered right to your inbox.

    Your e-mail is safe. Privacy Policy
    Advertisement

    Over 475,000 Recipes

    Food.com Network of Sites