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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / Sit Still and Let the Nice Photographer Take Your Picture!
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    1278 recipes in

    Sit Still and Let the Nice Photographer Take Your Picture!

    These are my recipes that don't have a picture taken of them----YET!
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    This will prove a blessing to everyone who takes it. It is soothing and relaxing, quieting to the nerves, has many good qualities, and is perfectly harmless. You can get the ingredients from any good health food store. You could up this to 1 cup each or lessen it to 1/8 cup each, according to your preference.

    Recipe #39959

    This is so easy and so good! From Woman's Day magazine.

    Recipe #91515

    Creamy and delicious! The cashews make the sauce so creamy and the meals comes together so quick! Another one from Pinterest with credit going to Half Baked.

    Recipe #506885

    This comes from Saveur magazine via the famous 21 Club in New York City(issue#122)! I have changed the recipe just a leetle bit(the original recipe used duck fat)!

    Recipe #383923

    Don't you look forward to a hearty bowl of soup on a cool fall evening? I do! Adapted from Chef2Chef.

    Recipe #193558

    This is quick and easy and very festive to make just before a party or picnic. For ultimate freshness, prepare this treat right before serving. Present it with toothpicks for spearing the fruit and a bowl of your favorite dip, if desired. One variation is to cook crescent rolls in a 8" by 13" pan, covered with cream cheese, then topped with the fruit. Another used a white tray, and this would be good on a 8" by 13" cake too. Feel free to use your imagination!To see what this looks like go to http://familyfun.go.com/4th-of-july/4th-of-july-recipes/patriotic-picnic-ideas/fruit-flag-686767/.

    Recipe #459273

    Ah Mexico! Such wonderful flavors come from there. Here is a quesadilla with goat's cheese, cottage cheese and mozzarella cheese, enhanced with spinach, tomato and cilantro, and of course, some jalapeno pepper!

    Recipe #354729

    Adobo is a Caribbean seasoning most often used for meat. This is a homemade version using a pureed mix of fresh onion, garlic, salt, and other seasonings. This recipe is also Spanish inspired.

    Recipe #49991

    Qormas are very popular among Afghan people. Onions are fried and meats, fruits, spices or vegetables are added to them. This is a vegetarian version, actually it's vegan! From squidoo.

    Recipe #500680

    If you've always thought beans were boring, try this super recipe flavored with almonds. The beans are served over couscous, a grain popular in Africa. I thought this was okay the first day, but the next day, I couldn't keep away from it! The first time I made it, I didn't make the couscous. You can make this in a crockpot too. Just check the water occasionally. Adapted from Shoshoni Cookbook: Vegetarian Recipes from the Shoshoni Yoga Retreat by Anne Saks and Faith Stone(via Delicious Living magazine).

    Recipe #384494

    A great way to use tamarind pods! A Mexican recipe adapted from Rick Bayless's book "Authentic Mexican". I have also discovered the tamarind is used throughout much of Africa! Now, having said that, tamarinds are also grown and widely popular in the tropics, so this could also be classed as a Caribbean recipe!

    Recipe #171410

    This traditional Iranian mixture of nuts, seeds, and dried fruits is a staple of winter solstice celebrations. This recipe came from December 2012 issue of Saveur, along with Ramin Ganeshram's story Midnight Snack.

    Recipe #506261

    Add a little Mexicana to your meal. A wonderful way to use corn on the cob. This recipe came from Gourmet Magazine.

    Recipe #76727

    Algerian version of the Middle Eastern chorba or stew. Great way to get your veggies. From Spark recipes.

    Recipe #501208

    This sounded just wierd enough to try it. Obviously a carrot is the same shape and close enough in color to make a decent hot dog substitute. But the real question is about the taste. The marinade really takes it to the next level. I think the sesame oil does it, but the vinegar gives it that “cured” flavor too. Adapted from Healthy Slow Cooking.

    Recipe #500000

    This is great served over chicken or fish! From Stop The Clock! Cooking: Defy Aging--Eat The Foods You Love by Cheryl Forberg

    Recipe #74172

    Have fun with this, it's so much easier than cooking flatbread on a rock! This is good grilled too. I haven't tried this yet. A little history: One of the things that is absolutely compelling about flatbreads is that they are old, really old. Many of the flatbreads eaten today have changed little over the last several thousand years. Flatbreads, such as sanguake in Iran, lavash in Armenia, and fetir made by the Bedouin in Israel, are all of ancient origin. When people first began cultivating grain, flatbreads were an obvious solution to the problem of how to turn hard grain into edible food; the grain could be pounded into flour, mixed with water, and cooked on a hot stone. The earliest method of cooking flatbreads probably involved spreading a dough or a batter over a very hot rock, then peeling the bread off from the rock when it had finished cooking, a method still used by the Hopi in making their remarkable blue corn piki bread. Adapted from the California Almond Board.

    Recipe #298829

    French Toast lover alert! This recipe will make you drool! Keep napkins available at all times! Almond paste is a mixture of ground almonds and sugar. You can find it in grocery stores.

    Recipe #45617

    This is a favorite, easy, yummy dessert or snack, even breakfast!

    Recipe #163706

    Recipe #341533

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