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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / Shoot Me...
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    140 recipes in

    Shoot Me...

    A photo on every recipe! What a beautiful sight that would be.......
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    I adopted this recipe from a member here at Zaar. This was her original description: "My daughter begged to take this recipe to school for her birthday party treat rather than cupcakes when she was six! The teachers asked me to make a separate batch for them the next time. We've been eating it every chance we get for the last twenty years. Given to me by a co-worker years' ago."

    Recipe #95209

    Swiss raclette, the dish of gently melted cheese (also named raclette) that is served with boiled potatoes, air-dried beef, and cornichons, inspired this more accessible version that uses easy-to-find, quick-to-melt Brie. Get some thick crusty French Bread as well! NOTE: Cocktail onions, most frequently found in your martini glass, can stand on their own as a pickle. Their slight crunch and pleasant tartness make them surprisingly tasty with Brie. Food & Wine. WINE: The wines of the Loire Valley in France are frequently overlooked by serious imbibers, but its elegant cabernet-franc-based reds are often more suitable at the table than more robust cabernet sauvignons. Go for a fruity Chinon or Saumur-Champigny.

    Recipe #133813

    This homey custard tart, redolent of cinnamon and brown sugar, tastes best when it's still warm from the oven and served with a raspberry-flavored beer, such as a Boon Framboise. Have the filling ready and the dough pressed in the pan, but assemble and bake the tart shortly before serving.

    Recipe #133807

    These offbeat tuna burgers were loosely inspired by a Thai fried white fish patty called tod man pla and discovered by Food & Wine. The Thai cucumber salad stands in for pickles. Use sushi-quality tuna so you can serve the burgers medium rare. The Ginger-Lemon Mayonnaise makes one cup and can be refrigerated for up to 3 days. MAKE AHEAD: According to the author, the recipe can be prepared through Step 3 and refrigerated for up to 3 hours. Beer Recommendation: An aromatic golden lager will complement the rich tuna here. Look for one with hoppy or lemony flavors, such as Asahi Super Premium from Japan or Singha Lager from Thailand. Wine: soft, off-dry riesling.

    Recipe #133737

    Instead of calling for ordinary rice pilaf, Chef James Boyce of Mary Elaine's in Scottsdale, Arizona, pairs juicy pork chops and dried fruit with crunchy quinoa, a nutritional powerhouse that delivers both protein and carbs, as well as fiber, potassium and riboflavin.

    Recipe #133657

    Wonderful tasting healthy stir fry that is out of this world good and good for you!

    Recipe #136218

    Caipirinha is the national drink of Brazil. The drink is made with cachaça (pronounced - kuh-sha-suh). It is technically a brandy and a member of the aguardente family. There is an old adage in Brazil: "quanto pior a cachaça, melhor a caipirinha" –– the worse the cachaça, the better the caipirinha. The name caipirinha is derived from the Portuguese word caipira (hick, hayseed, country bumpkin, rube, etc.) coupled with the -inha suffix (a diminutive denoting little or small) and can be roughly translated as little hick, little hayseed, little country bumpkin, little rube, etc., etc. Poor man’s drink or not, cachaça has become an integral part of Brazilian culture and its significance ranks right up there with soccer/football (futebol), carnival and samba as Brazilian national icons. The Brazilians like it sweet.... VERY sweet. In Brazil, the very best caipirinhas are made with "limões gallegos" –– what in the U.S. is often referred to as a key lime. Can also be made by the pitcher!

    Recipe #243468

    Josh DeChellis of Manhattan's Japanese-inspired Sumile flavors these incredibly simple but hugely satisfying beef burgers with miso, soy sauce, wasabi powder, sesame oil and other Asian staples. Make Ahead: The ginger-pickled onions, wasabi mayonnaise and miso sauce can be refrigerated separately in airtight containers overnight. Wine: rich, velvety merlot.

    Recipe #136246

    Strain the morel soaking liquid in this recipe and save it for adding depth of flavor to soups or stews. You can also use frozen pierogie dough found in the freezer section of your grocery store. Recipe by Food & Wine's Marcia Kiesel. MAKE AHEAD The pierogies can be prepared through Step 5 and frozen for up to 1 month. Boil frozen pierogies for the same amount of time indicated for the fresh ones.The rich, smoky filling in these pierogies makes them perfect foils for a full-flavored Merlot with velvety tannins like the 1994 Columbia Crest Estate Series from Washington State or the 1995 Meerlust from South Africa.

    Recipe #135406

    You could use store-bought seedless raspberry preserves to fill these cookies, but Hermé's method of pureeing the raspberries in a blender to extract all the pectin from the seeds is clever and easy, and it makes a better filling than any you can buy. MAKE AHEAD: The cookies can be refrigerated in an airtight container for up to 1 week or frozen for up to 2 months. NOTES: The Linzer dough can be cut into decorative shapes, but the cookies aren't particularly sweet without the raspberry jam, so dust them with confectioners' sugar once they've cooled.

    Recipe #134823

    Australian cookbook author Charmaine Solomon created a spicy recipe that has a range of nuanced flavors. This recipe is quick and delicious! Food and Wine, Nov. 2004. Serve with a light, spicy pinot grigio.

    Recipe #134816

    Beets and potatoes roast alongside each other in the same pan. Wait until they're cooked to toss them together, though, or you'll end up with bright-pink potatoes. A fillet of salmon roasts at the same oven temperature, and a drizzle of creamy horseradish sauce tops them all. In the Pacific Northwest, where they really know their seafood, pinot noir is the wine of choice with salmon. It should be yours, too. Try a fruity example from Oregon or California.

    Recipe #134813

    Some say it was during the 16th century that the famous Medici family invented zabaglione. Others credit Giovan Paolo Baglioni, a fierce Italian nobleman turned warlord who, during the late 15th century, fed his troops a "soup" made of eggs, wild honey and wine. Still others credit the pastry cooks of Turin for creating this delicious mixture of creamed egg yolks, sugar and Marsala. Here the word zabaglione is believed to have been named after a local parish priest, San Pasquale Bayon, who was renowned for his culinary abilities. Regardless of its exact origin, zabaglione's roots are planted in Italian food history. Zabaglione evolved as a delicacy that eventually became popular in France, where it is known as sabayon. Zabaglione or sabayon is a delicate sauce of foamed egg yolks, sugar, and wine. (Marsala is traditional in the Italian version, and Champagne or dry white wine is preferred in the French version.) The yolks are whipped vigorously as they cook over simmering water until a dense, thick foam develops. Whipping allows the incorporation of air, which creates a foam. The following recipe for Zabaglione with Fresh Berries has been adapted from The Culinary Institute of America's Baking and Pastry, Mastering the Art and Craft.Note: If desired, whip 6 fl oz of heavy cream to medium peaks and fold into cooled zabaglione.

    Recipe #134806

    These crisp potato pancakes come from the Brombergs' grandmother, Martha Finkelstein, who insisted that there is no flavor substitute for schmaltz (rendered chicken fat). Schmaltz is available at kosher delicatessens. MAKE AHEAD: The latkes can be fried early in the day and re-crisped on a baking sheet in a 350° oven. NOTES To make schmaltz, use the large clumps of fat from the neck, body cavity, and from under the skin. In a small, heavy saucepan, cook the fat over low heat until completely melted. Cool, then strain the clear fat into a glass jar and refrigerate for up to 1 week or freeze. Vanilla Applesauce makes 2 1/2 cups and can be refrigerated for up to 1 week.

    Recipe #134042

    A deliciously classy martini that highlights Campari and Limoncello! It tastes like summer in a glass! Serve this to your guests after a nice filling Italian meal! Please use premium vodka, anything less would be a disappointment. Based on the recipe from the Martini Bar in Miami.

    Recipe #245066

    The best pierogi dough ever! The dough is very easy to work with and does not break when boiling. The addition of the cake flour makes all the difference, they come out soft and wonderful. Dough may be made 2 hours ahead, wrapped well in plastic wrap and chilled. Bring to room temperature before using. Makes enough for about 48 pierogies or 32 varenikis. Cooking time is fridge time.

    Recipe #133968

    Versatile mini Irish soda breads that are good served with cheese, spread with butter and jam at teatime, or paired with a main-course salad. How about cooking up a batch for Saint Patrick's Day? I found this recipe on a baking website called DianasDesserts.com for Zaar World Tour 2005.

    Recipe #133948

    In the Middle Ages, Flemish cities were at the crossroads of the Northern spice routes, and brewers and cooks both took advantage of exotic spices. According to Food & Wine, you'll see that influence in this curried soup and in the Blanche de Bruges that is its ideal wheat beer accompaniment. MAKE AHEAD: The curried soup can be prepared through Step 1 and refrigerated overnight.

    Recipe #133809

    Sauerkraut simmered with vegetables, apple, and juniper berries is a perfect match for bacon and chicken thighs. The robust combination of flavors makes this a great hearty winter dish. Created by the staff of Food & Wine. For a white wine that will contrast nicely with the sauerkraut, look for a soft, full-flavored, and unoaked white. Gewürztraminer or pinot gris from Alsace in France are ideal choices.

    Recipe #133810

    North African in spirit, this dish is easy enough for weeknight cooking but impressive enough to serve to guests. Note the sauté-and-roast technique used to prepare the chicken, which results in crisp skin and juicy meat. Contrast the strong, sweet, spicy and salty notes in the relish with a fruity, medium-weight Zinfandel. Look for the 1997 Eberle Paso Robles Sauret Vineyard or the 1998 Ridge Sonoma Station.

    Recipe #133824

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