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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / Shoot Me...
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    140 recipes in

    Shoot Me...

    A photo on every recipe! What a beautiful sight that would be.......
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    I adopted this recipe from a member here at Zaar. This was her original description: "My daughter begged to take this recipe to school for her birthday party treat rather than cupcakes when she was six! The teachers asked me to make a separate batch for them the next time. We've been eating it every chance we get for the last twenty years. Given to me by a co-worker years' ago."

    Recipe #95209

    Fesenjan, also known as khoresht-e fesenjan, is typically made for special occasions in Iran. It is traditionally made with duck or pheasant in the north of the country along the Caspian sea. It is a thick, rich, sweet-sour dish that improves in flavor the next day. Pomegranate syrup, sometimes called pomegranate molasses, is available in most Middle Eastern and health food stores (make sure it does not say "sour" ) If using fresh pomegranate juice, use 1 1/2 to 2 cups and reduce the stock or water. Adding a 1/2 tsp ground cardamom or 1/2 tsp cinnamon when sautéing the onions will add a richer flavor. Add more sugar if the sauce is too tart, or lime or lemon juice if it is too sweet. A peeled and cubed eggplant is sometimes added. Sauté the eggplant along with the onions. You may need to add a little more liquid as it simmers.

    Recipe #233487

    This is my favorite garlic soup of all. It is wonderful and each bite is as memorable as the first. This garlic soup differs from the ordinary garlic soup as it is hearty but also elegant. It is the kind of soup a person craves when recovering from a cold or a broken heart. It has cured a number of hangovers over the years although scrawled above the recipe I have written “Do not attempt to make with a really really bad hangover!!!!” – and I heed that warning, so plan ahead (I am pretty sure it means not to make it with a real bad hangover if you have to also make the stock). The combination of garlic, herbs and cloves is magic; the tomato juice adds zip and the unctuous egg yolk enrichment is balanced by the pasta’s pleasant, soothing note. This will cure whatever ails you….For an even heartier entrée; place a poached egg on each croûte before ladling the soup over it. Wonderful! This soup is best when made with my Browned Vegetable Stock recipe (#150683), you could use other stock, but it would be a real shame…. a real shame…. so heighten your experience and make the stock as well… you won’t be sorry. For a fine-but-not-fussy meal you’ll be proud to set before anyone, try this soup with THE Salad (“the” Salad Recipe #150702) … because you can never have too much garlic! LOL! Finish with a fruity dessert like a really good baked apple made with brown sugar and served with gingerbread and a dollop of yogurt….. yummy!

    Recipe #150699

    I adore empanadas. Empanadas are a ubiquitous snack in Argentina. Rosa Angelita Castro de Flores learned to make these from her mother, Sara Julia Castro, who came from the northern province of Catamarca. She shared this recipe with Saveur Magazine. Time does not include chill time. You can save time and use pastry sheets if you need to. Also, I do not particularly like raisins so I omit them.

    Recipe #138705

    I have several recipes for Steak Diane, and this one is from the 21 Club. Cooks Notes: Use the best steak you can afford, from a good butcher.

    Recipe #149856

    Eggs Benedict is one of my favorite breakfast dishes. It was created at the Waldorf Hotel in 1894, for a customer hoping to find a cure for his morning hangover. I thought it was one of those dishes that should only be ordered in a restaurant until I found this recipe. Keep in mind that your eggs should be fresh and no more then 4 days old for perfect results. It is not as hard as it looks and what could be better then starting your day with a lightly toasted English muffin with a perfectly poached egg in a cloud of buttery hollandaise! Sheer heaven!

    Recipe #132773

    A wonderful tasting and attractive hors d’oeuvre that can easily be made ahead of time, to be baked later. I sampled these at a friends art opening and had to have the recipe. Everyone was raving over how good they were and could not believe that she hadn't hired someone to make them.

    Recipe #127155

    Wonderful Bass with a great flavor. This is a keeper and so worth trying!!! From the lovely magazine: Food & Wine. Wine: Try an Alsatian Pinot Gris, such as the 1997 Domaine Ostertag Fronholz.

    Recipe #136243

    These hors d'oeuvre were served at a gallery opening and were consumed before the host could put the tray down. This elegant hors d’oeuvre can be prepared a day ahead and baked just before serving. The stuffing mixture also makes an excellent filling for chicken breasts or fish fillets. Goes great with a nice bottle of Australian Shiraz. This wonderful recipe was found on a beautiful website: www.finedinings.com

    Recipe #127160

    Some say it was during the 16th century that the famous Medici family invented zabaglione. Others credit Giovan Paolo Baglioni, a fierce Italian nobleman turned warlord who, during the late 15th century, fed his troops a "soup" made of eggs, wild honey and wine. Still others credit the pastry cooks of Turin for creating this delicious mixture of creamed egg yolks, sugar and Marsala. Here the word zabaglione is believed to have been named after a local parish priest, San Pasquale Bayon, who was renowned for his culinary abilities. Regardless of its exact origin, zabaglione's roots are planted in Italian food history. Zabaglione evolved as a delicacy that eventually became popular in France, where it is known as sabayon. Zabaglione or sabayon is a delicate sauce of foamed egg yolks, sugar, and wine. (Marsala is traditional in the Italian version, and Champagne or dry white wine is preferred in the French version.) The yolks are whipped vigorously as they cook over simmering water until a dense, thick foam develops. Whipping allows the incorporation of air, which creates a foam. The following recipe for Zabaglione with Fresh Berries has been adapted from The Culinary Institute of America's Baking and Pastry, Mastering the Art and Craft.Note: If desired, whip 6 fl oz of heavy cream to medium peaks and fold into cooled zabaglione.

    Recipe #134806

    This is a great summertime adult shake that uses fresh peaches. Frozen peaches can be substituted as well. Serve in fancy glassware and garnish with peach slices.

    Recipe #179495

    A quick and healthy salad for a perfect lunch or light dinner. At 172 Calories a serving and 6 grams of fat this recipe is perfect for those who are watching what they eat and don't want to compromise flavor. This recipe is Better Homes and Gardens editor's top ten healthy heart recipe.

    Recipe #144664

    Caipirinha is the national drink of Brazil. The drink is made with cachaça (pronounced - kuh-sha-suh). It is technically a brandy and a member of the aguardente family. There is an old adage in Brazil: "quanto pior a cachaça, melhor a caipirinha" –– the worse the cachaça, the better the caipirinha. The name caipirinha is derived from the Portuguese word caipira (hick, hayseed, country bumpkin, rube, etc.) coupled with the -inha suffix (a diminutive denoting little or small) and can be roughly translated as little hick, little hayseed, little country bumpkin, little rube, etc., etc. Poor man’s drink or not, cachaça has become an integral part of Brazilian culture and its significance ranks right up there with soccer/football (futebol), carnival and samba as Brazilian national icons. The Brazilians like it sweet.... VERY sweet. In Brazil, the very best caipirinhas are made with "limões gallegos" –– what in the U.S. is often referred to as a key lime. Can also be made by the pitcher!

    Recipe #243468

    Source: "Cooking at Home"

    Recipe #37524

    The best pierogi dough ever! The dough is very easy to work with and does not break when boiling. The addition of the cake flour makes all the difference, they come out soft and wonderful. Dough may be made 2 hours ahead, wrapped well in plastic wrap and chilled. Bring to room temperature before using. Makes enough for about 48 pierogies or 32 varenikis. Cooking time is fridge time.

    Recipe #133968

    This is an exotic dish with familiar ingredients that will transport you to the islands with your first bite. This family friendly dish is served in a “boat”, topped with a cilantro cream sauce and sprinkled with tomatoes for a visually appealing island feast. Serve with fresh crusty bread and a bottle of wine for a special dinner for two. The Chicken can easily be left out to make this a great vegetarian main dish. The low fat options make this great for those on the South Beach Diet. This recipe was created for RSC #8.

    Recipe #161333

    This rub is less fiery then traditional Jamaican Jerk seasoning... but although it lacks the heat, it does not compromise the flavor, so the whole family can enjoy this one. If you'd like to kick the heat up a notch, just add more cayenne pepper to the rub. Corn bread, rice and beans (or just plain rice), or corn on the cob would all taste great with this highly spiced chicken. Fried plantains are another appropriate accompaniment. The longer you can marinate the chicken legs, the more the flavor will penetrate the meat. I suggested forty minutes, but you can marinate the chicken for up to twenty-four hours. BEVERAGE: The strong flavors in this recipe pair best with a refreshing wine such as a slightly chilled French Beaujolais. Or crack open a cold Red Stripe!

    Recipe #224789

    Pisco is a clear brandy that is popular in both Peru and Chile. The white muscat grapes, from which pisco is distilled, were first grown in Peru by the Spaniards in the 16th century (at that time Peru & Chile were both part of Spain’s American empire.) When they became independent countries, both claimed the liquor as their own. Therefore the national drink of both Peru and Chile, is the rich “Pisco Sour.” However there is a difference in sweetness and the citrus used between the two countries’ piscos. I have posted both recipes so be sure to try the Recipe #243479 as well. Note: Egg whites are sometimes used in chilean pisco sours as well, but for the purist, they will say it is unnecessary adornment.

    Recipe #243483

    Strikingly beautiful rolls with a wonderful crusty toasted hard cheese and herb topping. Wonderful for special meals, guests or just for that extra special touch. Parmigiano-Reggiano, Asiago and Romano cheese can be used for this recipe. If you have to, you can sub dried herbs for the fresh, although the fresh herbs are worth the trip to the market. Make Ahead: The unbaked rolls can be refrigerated overnight, then brought to room temperature the next day and let rise (loosely covered) for 2 hours, then baked. The rolls can also be baked earlier in the day and then reheated just before serving.

    Recipe #151110

    If you like sweet and sour combinations then you will love Midori Sours! The traditional way to prepare a Midori Sours is to shake it on ice and strain it into a rocks glass, but I like them on the rocks and with a good quality vodka. Whichever way you prefer... they are still good!

    Recipe #243093

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