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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / Shoot Me...
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    140 recipes in

    Shoot Me...

    A photo on every recipe! What a beautiful sight that would be.......
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    A wonderful turkey for a special occasion! The favors of this turkey will impress all that are lucky enough to dine at your table. This recipe is from Grace Parisi and is a Food and Wine Staff Favorite. WINE: A rich Alsace Riesling will match the spices in this Alsatian-flavored turkey. Pick one with depth and complexity such as the 2002 Domaine Weinbach Cuvée Sainte Catherine. Or try a tart and fruity red like the 2001 Sokol Blosser Willamette Valley Pinot Noir from Oregon.

    Recipe #144829

    Ahhhh amaretto! Found this breakfast recipe on the Disaronno website. Sounds positively delicious and so romantic... after all.. amaretto is the liquor of love.

    Recipe #162268

    This is a fun and tasty snack you can make when camping or around an outdoor fire from Andreas Viestad of New Scandinavian Cooking. The dough is rolled up on a stick and baked over an open fire. Make sure not to bake the bread directly in or over the fire, as that will char the bread without baking it. Great recipe for kids!

    Recipe #169959

    In keeping with his motto that "everything is better with bacon," Chef Robert Stehling of Charleston's Hominy Grill makes a bacon-herb paste that he stuffs under the turkey skin to produce an incredibly moist and smoky bird. MAKE AHEAD: The turkey can be prepared through Step 2 and refrigerated overnight. Bring the bird to room temperature before roasting. Wine: Both fruity, low-tannin reds and round, not-too-oaky whites will complement the smoky bacon here. Pick a spicy Pinot Noir, such as the 1999 Byron Sierra Madre Vineyard, or a creamy Chardonnay, such as the 2000 Acacia.

    Recipe #144830

    Crocodile tastes similar to chicken but with a mild fish flavor. The tail is definitely the best part. This is how Chef Anthony Hendre prepares it in Port Douglas in Far North Queensland, Australia. This recipe will work with gator as well.

    Recipe #142917

    I saw these made on television last night and the recipe really intrigued me. They were originally made by wives for their husbands to take to work out in the fields or mines. They are a whole meal-in-one pastry making them both sweet and savory. Maybe they are the original TV dinner LOL. The crust would be more authentic and tastier using lard, but taste better using the lard/butter combo. The wives would also make some of the pastry into letters and apply to the top of the clanger their husband's initials so they were easy to identify. They can be made with chicken as well.

    Recipe #176824

    This is a extraordinary romantic breakfast, brunch or dessert recipe using Limoncello. To make your own liqueur, I have posted this recipe: Limoncello (Lemoncello, Limoncella) Recipe #167289. Buon appetito!

    Recipe #191138

    A deliciously classy martini that highlights Campari and Limoncello! It tastes like summer in a glass! Serve this to your guests after a nice filling Italian meal! Please use premium vodka, anything less would be a disappointment. Based on the recipe from the Martini Bar in Miami.

    Recipe #245066

    These cookies are a Halloween twist on the famous New York City classic: the black-and-white cookie. Covered with a soft, sweet icing, these cookies resemble miniature cakes in texture and taste. Perfect for your ghouls and goblins!

    Recipe #192483

    This is a delicious sweet cordial using cognac (or brandy) and virtually any kind of berry can be used. This was posted in response to a forum request. Cognac VS should work well with this recipe.

    Recipe #157599

    Wonderful bread! Although tradition dictates that this bread should be served with Boston Bake Beans it is also great with a bowl of soup, a salad or with a main dish. You will need 3 10-ounce coffee cans to bake this bread, although it can also be baked in 8X4 loaf pans (but then you will not have the beautiful rounds that make this bread special). The loaves can be frozen for up to 1 month. This recipe is from Massachusetts' infamous baker René Becker of the Hi-Rise Bread Company. I have only made it with fragrant organic flours, but I am sure non organic flours would work as well.

    Recipe #151109

    Here's a unique and refreshing pasta salad from Food and Wine with flavors reminiscent of Morocco and Southern Italy, where oranges and black olives are often paired. Wine: A white or rosé wine from Provence or the Languedoc-Roussillon region of France makes sense with this; either will pair well with the mint and the salty olive tastes of the dish.

    Recipe #140684

    Sauerkraut simmered with vegetables, apple, and juniper berries is a perfect match for bacon and chicken thighs. The robust combination of flavors makes this a great hearty winter dish. Created by the staff of Food & Wine. For a white wine that will contrast nicely with the sauerkraut, look for a soft, full-flavored, and unoaked white. Gewürztraminer or pinot gris from Alsace in France are ideal choices.

    Recipe #133810

    A beautiful punch that is perfect for holiday entertaining! This recipe is by author Tom Colicchio (Think Like a Chef and Bravo's Top Chef) and appeared in Food & Wine's Holiday Special: Entertaining article.

    Recipe #146714

    Swiss raclette, the dish of gently melted cheese (also named raclette) that is served with boiled potatoes, air-dried beef, and cornichons, inspired this more accessible version that uses easy-to-find, quick-to-melt Brie. Get some thick crusty French Bread as well! NOTE: Cocktail onions, most frequently found in your martini glass, can stand on their own as a pickle. Their slight crunch and pleasant tartness make them surprisingly tasty with Brie. Food & Wine. WINE: The wines of the Loire Valley in France are frequently overlooked by serious imbibers, but its elegant cabernet-franc-based reds are often more suitable at the table than more robust cabernet sauvignons. Go for a fruity Chinon or Saumur-Champigny.

    Recipe #133813

    Wonderful Bass with a great flavor. This is a keeper and so worth trying!!! From the lovely magazine: Food & Wine. Wine: Try an Alsatian Pinot Gris, such as the 1997 Domaine Ostertag Fronholz.

    Recipe #136243

    A cute bread bowl shaped like a car that can be filled with your favorite dip. Great for parties! Menu #632

    Recipe #197951

    Caipirinha is the national drink of Brazil. The drink is made with cachaça (pronounced - kuh-sha-suh). It is technically a brandy and a member of the aguardente family. There is an old adage in Brazil: "quanto pior a cachaça, melhor a caipirinha" –– the worse the cachaça, the better the caipirinha. The name caipirinha is derived from the Portuguese word caipira (hick, hayseed, country bumpkin, rube, etc.) coupled with the -inha suffix (a diminutive denoting little or small) and can be roughly translated as little hick, little hayseed, little country bumpkin, little rube, etc., etc. Poor man’s drink or not, cachaça has become an integral part of Brazilian culture and its significance ranks right up there with soccer/football (futebol), carnival and samba as Brazilian national icons. The Brazilians like it sweet.... VERY sweet. In Brazil, the very best caipirinhas are made with "limões gallegos" –– what in the U.S. is often referred to as a key lime. Can also be made by the pitcher!

    Recipe #243468

    Serve these tasty sosaties over rice and chopped fruit such as banana or mango. The marinating time is at least overnight and up to 3 days, plan accordingly. You can also use beef or pork (pork is totally non-traditional) for this recipe. You can use the lemon water as a substitute, however Tamarind is traditionally used in this recipe to add a sour note to balance the sweet flavour. The easiest way to buy tamarind is in cans (Goya) in the Mexican Food section. But it is also sold in packets as a pulp, it looks like pulped dates. You will not be using the pulp, but water made from the pulp. Soak about 100 grams of pulp in water for 10-20 minutes. Squeeze the tamarind pulp with your hand to squeeze out the sour juices. Use the water and keep the pulp in the fridge to reuse. You can reuse the pulp several times until it loses it sourness.

    Recipe #173545

    Almost any cheese can be used to make these crisps. Sharper cheeses are the best for sweeter soups and mild cheese for full body soups. The Parmesan and asiago mix makes for a great appetizer/canape base or salad topping. The uses for the crisps are endless; soup or salad toppings, chips for chip and dip, base for finger food, etc. Use your imagination. They can be stored in an airtight container for up to 2 days. Re-crisp in a hot oven right before serving.

    Recipe #156845

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