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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / Scrumptious Scones.................hot with butter
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    15 recipes in

    Scrumptious Scones.................hot with butter

    I am a scone lover! I love them, savoury or sweet, they will do for me any time of day or night! Here are my scone recipes, all nestled together in a basket with a crisp linen liner and butter waiting on the side, with jam too if you like! Don't forget, scones make a great vehicle for fillings........sort of like a scone sandwich; ham and cream cheese, cucumbers, salad, fresh strawberries or raspberries with cream.......the list is endless. I hope you enjoy my scone recipes as much as I enjoy eating them! Scone Recipe History & Tradition ~ A little history.......... The word scone is said to have come from the name of a place where Scottish kings were crowned. This place was known as 'The Stone Of Destiny'. "Scone is a town in Scotland where the Scottish kings were crowned. Pronounced skoon rather than scawn. The stone of destiny is the stone that sat below the throne that the kings were crowned on." - F. Bridgeford (Scotland) Early scones were baked from oats and were shaped like a triangle. Today they are traditionally flour-based and are baked in the oven unlike the early days when they were griddle-baked. Scones are fairly easy to bake and are a great compliment to the traditional English Tea!

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    When I was last back in England, I bought a bag of semi-dried mixed summer berries; strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, bilberries (wild blueberries) and cherries, all semi-dried and bursting with colour and flavour. I could not wait to cook with them, having sampled a few of them first of course! I came up with this recipe, a simple classic scone recipe, the mainstay of all English tea tables and they simply flew off the table, with requests for the recipe. The stars of the show are the semi-dried berries, and a good home-made jam and cream of course. Use any semi-dried berries you can source locally, but do try to replicate the summer berries I have listed, for that optimum flavour sensation!

    Recipe #428883

    Served warm and oozing with butter, these fabulous fruity griddlecakes make a great treat for breakfast or afternoon tea. I remember my grandmother making these when I was little; she lived in a very old stone cottage in Northumberland, and made these on a huge cast iron black griddle, or girdle as they were also called! We used to eat them hot from the griddle, with butter – in front of a roaring wood fire during the winter months. Singin' hinnies are a type of fried fruit scone or griddle cake, so called as they 'sing' and sizzle whilst cooking. 'Hinny' is a Northern term for endearment used especially to children - my grandmother used to call me "hinny". Similar to singin' hinnies are Northumbrian griddle cakes, also known as Gosforth gridies. If you are making them for a children’s party or at Christmas, put coins that have been briefly boiled, then wrapped in greaseproof paper, in the middle of some of the singin’ hinnies.

    Recipe #388389

    Eat these hot, split & spread with fresh churned butter, fresh cream and homemade jam, preferably strawberry........not forgetting to lick your fingers afterwards - discreetly! These always made an appearance on my Mum and Grandmother's Afternoon Tea Table....it's simply expected my dear! You can also add dried fruit to these to make traditional fruit scones, such as sultanas, currants and raisins; I have added that option in the recipe. The traditional English Cream Tea is very popular in the South West of England, especially in Devon and Cornwall - there you will be offered a pot of tea with fluffy warm scones, butter, cream and strawberry jam. In Devon, you will be served double Devon cream and in Cornwall, you will be offered clotted cream – that’s the main difference.

    Recipe #230515

    When I worked in York, I used to nip down to Betty's of York Tea Rooms in my lunch break and treat myself to one of these delicious buns! Actually, they are a cross between a bun and a scone, and Betty's Fat Rascals differ from some other recipes, as they have whole blanched almonds and glace cherries on top! The origin of the name is unknown, but they are thought to have been made since the mid 19th Century - under the name of Fat Rascals! They originate from Yorkshire and Durham, and are very popular in most bakeries in the North East of England. These tasty fruit and peel buns are wonderful with a cuppa, to take on a picnic or, to tuck into a lunch box for the hungry workers and children! The original recipe uses lard, probably where the word "Fat" comes from - but I am not a lover of lard, so I have specified butter. A poignant historical note: A few years after Betty’s opened its doors in York war broke out, and Betty’s – in particular the basement ‘Betty’s Bar’ – became a favourite haunt of thousands of airmen stationed around York. ‘Betty’s Mirror’, on which many of them engraved their signatures with a diamond pen, remains on display today as a fitting tribute to their bravery, as obviously, some never came back. (NB: I note that a reviewer has said these are NOT Betty's Fat Rascals!! Well of course they aren't, as I don't have the "secret" recipe - but they are a very close match! There are dozens of Fat Rascals recipes throughout Yorkshire, this recipe is as close as you will get outside Betty's Tea Room! Enjoy them as a typical Yorkshire treat, as I still do in France!)

    Recipe #290996

    When I was back home in England recently, I visited a local lavender farm called Wold's Way Lavender in North Yorkshire; we had tea and these delicious lavender scones in their delightful little tea room; this is my attempt to recreate those scones - using some of my home-grown culinary lavender from the garden here in France! I have made them several times now and they have turned out just as I remembered them, especially good if split whilst still warm, buttered and spread with lavender honey or lavender-infused cream! Just a note of interest......lavender was often used during Tudor and Elizabethan times in the preparation of a wide variety of dishes and was a particular favourite of Queen Elizabeth I. The palace gardeners were required to have lavender flowers available at all times which were used to make Conserve of Lavender (a mixture of lavender flowers and sugar) and sweet lavender tisane, a drink made with lavender flowers, boiling water and honey.

    Recipe #235618

    Gorgeous spiced pumpkin scones with honey butter - what a treat for the tea-time table during autumn and winter. I have made these twice now and love the combination of the honey butter with the scones, although they are also delicious with plain unsalted butter. This recipe came from an Australian "Olive" magazine that was sent to me, apparently, Queensland is famous for its blue pumpkins where this recipe originates from - I added the spices as well as the honey butter! A wonderful recipe for the cooler months, but as it uses tinned or frozen pumpkin, these can be made all year around. If you don't want to serve these with the honey butter, just split them whilst warm and spread with normal butter or cream. Mixed spice is a British spice mixture, I have a recipe for this on RZ: Recipe #266688

    Recipe #397407

    Delightful light and lemony glazed scones with just a hint of spice! These are even more delicious when split and spread with lemon curd - and maybe a dollop of cream for good measure! These would be wonderful when served for afternoon tea, or make a batch up for a spring picnic. This recipe was on a set of recipe cards that a kind friend sent to me from the States, and I adapted them slightly to my own taste. If you are unable to source mixed spice, I have a recipe for mixed spice on zaar: Recipe #266688

    Recipe #413051

    A delightful and EASY scone recipe that is perfect for a proper afternoon tea or to take on a picnic. Dried sour cherries are sensational and give a deep essence of cherry flavour to these scones, whilst the buttermilk makes them light and airy. This is a casual eating scone, easy to rustle up, and is perfect when eaten fresh from the oven with butter and maybe some cherry jam and cream too! If taking on a picnic, wrap the scone in a clean tea towel to keep it warm and pack the butter and jam separately. Makes one large scone, which is marked to split into wedges when served.

    Recipe #408471

    Delicious and easy to make soda bread scones, which are perfect when served alongside soups, stews or an Irish or Scottish breakfast. These can be whipped up in a trice and make a nice alternative to bread.........they are also delectable when eaten hot, split and spread with fresh butter.

    Recipe #389019

    Great served fresh from the oven - split open and douse dangerously with butter.....naughty but very, VERY nice!! These also keep very well in an airtight tin or container and can be toasted next day or gently warmed through in a low oven. Ideal for freezing - will keep in freezer bags for up to 2 months. Great picnic fare - split them open and spread with garlic & chive soft cream cheese, (Boursin or Philadelphia type) or make cheese & ham scone sandwiches or even cucumber scone sandwiches!! The oats give them a great texture - I use fairly coarse porridge oats. This recipe is easily doubled for larger crowds or greedy people!!!

    Recipe #184024

    "We need more cheese Gromit!" Very serious cheesy scones which use way more cheese than normal for a scone mix; they will not rise quite as high as plain scones - but as you can see from the photo, they get there! Try and use a good quality mature Cheddar or any local type of strong cheese that is available. They can be made in about 20 minutes, if you have all the ingredients to hand and the oven has been pre-heated. Great for afternoon tea, picnics, buffets & packed lunches. You can also add chopped chives & herbs for a change.

    Recipe #207557

    Well, why share this delectable cheese with the children?! I discovered this recipe whilst at home in England - it was on a leaflet given out by the Lincolnshire Poacher Cheese company - I have made these twice now, and this is my slightly adapted recipe based on the original. A little bit of history about this superb English cheese.......Simon Jones, who started to make Lincolnshire Poacher, is the fourth generation to be running the farm, which has been in the family since 1917. It is situated on the edge of the beautiful Lincolnshire Wolds about ten miles from the east coast. The lush pastures sit on chalky land, which enables him to have a successful dairy herd in an area where dairy farms are very scarce and cheesemaking is virtually unknown. This cheddar-like unpasteurized cheese is the Supreme Champion at the British Cheese Awards, and is buttery, smooth, and nutty in taste. The sharp flavour will linger on your palate. It is aged anywhere from 18-24 months.

    Recipe #231021

    Another one of my Scottish grandmother's recipes! I have several cheese scone recipes posted on Zaar, but this one is one of my favourites. Spring onions are also called green onions or scallions. My mum still makes these regularly and serves them filled with cream cheese (Boursin is great!) and cooked ham, a tea-time scone sandwich! Try to use a mature Scottish cheddar - my favourite comes from the Isle of Mull, but any mature farmhouse cheddar cheese will work. Another idea is to make mini versions of these scones for delightful appetisers, spread them with a filling of your choice - very welcome with a chilled wine or sherry!

    Recipe #359844

    This Californian olive recipe was sent to me by some lovely Bed and Breakfast guests (now good friends), who come from Temecula in California. They have stayed with us a couple of times now and love this part of SW France, and the food and wine! They grow olives and avocados, and regularly send me a selection of "California Growers" recipe leaflets, magazines and cookbooks, as well as a box of avocados every year! Always a treat! I have made these scones/biscuits several times now for appetisers and nibbles, as well as for picnics - they are delicious when eaten warm with fresh butter, mustard and ham. I make these with French olives, but I am sure my friends don't mind!

    Recipe #384798

    Delicious cheesy scones with crispy bacon, a real treat for breakfast or high tea. These traditional scones are wonderful when served with fried or scrambled eggs for breakfast, alongside grilled tomatoes or mushrooms maybe. This is a recipe from an old W. I. (Woman's Insitute) cookbook and originates from the city of Birmingham, in the Midlands, England. Traditional comforting and British fare on a plate! Note: Brummie is the British slang term for people who come from Birmingham.

    Recipe #421082


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