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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / Puget Sound Recipes
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    152 recipes in

    Puget Sound Recipes

    Recipes from Washington State, the Seattle area, and/or the Puget Sound area. Enjoy!
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    I often make delicious recipe #31207 and recipe #100417 individually, but it just makes sense to combine it all together in one great side dish! Also good as a steak, poultry, or fish topper. I just love it when the leeks are in season here in the Pacific Northwest... :)

    Recipe #246891

    The restaurant Wild Ginger is one of the reasons I moved to Seattle. I have never had a thing there that isn't outstanding. This dish is very flavorful!

    Recipe #236899

    The mojito is a cooling effervescent coctail inspired by Havanas's blithe lifestyle in the 1920's. While Hemingway's Cuba is long gone, it's spirit lives on in the sparkling blend of sugar, mint and lime. Adapted from the Seattle Post Intelligencer. Caribbean, Mexican, Southern, and Western.

    Recipe #233765

    I love the lemon olives I can buy at Central Market in Shoreline, just north of Seattle. This recipe from Fine Cooking, #55 has more flavors involved but looks quite similar. Use oil- or brine-packed olives. (The lemons are for zest only, so after zesting, juice the lemons and save the juice for another use.)

    Recipe #228812

    1 Reviews |  By BarbryT

    This recipe is from the St. Croix Source newspaper, February 2003. I plan to try it as new summer squash come to the Seattle Farmers Markets.

    Recipe #228751

    2 Reviews |  By Kater

    This recipe comes from the Seattle P-I. I'm posting here so that I don't lose it! It sounds delicious!

    Recipe #227974

    Looking through my old and very large recipe file, (from the old days when I wrote everything down!), I found this. I'm not completely sure if it came from The Seattle Times. I think I took it to potlucks back in the 80's.

    Recipe #223316

    6 Reviews |  By lazyme

    This simple and tasty stir-fry is from the Wild Ginger Restaurant in Seattle. We like to serve this over cooked soba noodles with some stir-fried vegetables on the side.

    Recipe #222801

    1 Reviews |  By ktdid

    Crispy on the outside, tender and moist inside, and the preparation and appearance are conversation starters! Can be prepped ahead, so these are great for entertaining (but they are one of my family's favorites for any dinner). Recipe is an amalgam of Crash Hot Potatoes from Jill Dupleix and Smashed Potatoes published around Easter in the Seattle Times.

    Recipe #222698

    7 Reviews |  By lazyme

    From the Seattle Times newspaper, a simple and tasty side dish. This can be prepared ahead of time and rewarmed before serving. Do not add the bacon or lime juice until just before serving.ZWT South region (Cajun) and Mid-West region (corn).

    Recipe #215425

    This recipe comes from the restaurant named The Kaleenka, out of the Bite of Seattle Cook Book.

    Recipe #210431

    One of the most treasured recipes around from the restaurant reviewer of the Seattle Times who published it only three times. He now owns a sauce company to produce the sauce. Watch the red chili pepper; he means one of those little things that comes in a tin, not the ones braided together. Better to use 1/2 tsp dried chili flakes. I’ve changed the recipe a bit, and take the oregano times 1.5, the basil X 2, use 2 cups of sliced mushrooms and use wine to create a sauce of ample quantity; the better so sop up with wedges of focaccia. I also double the parmesan and prefer the dried to fresh cheese. I use 1/2 to 1 can of olives and use fresh basil; if using dried make sure you use extra wine for reconstitution. I am a bit more generous with clams and juice, as I divide the 51 oz containers commonly found in bulk stores into 4 parts, and freeze. This means the clams and juice equal 12.75 oz.

    Recipe #209088

    4 Reviews |  By BarbryT

    Living in Seattle, and having eaten these at Etta's, I can attest that Etta's Crab Cakes are superb. They are included in "I Love Crab Cakes: 50 Recipes for an American Classic" by Tom Douglas with Shelley Lance and have been "rereleased" (so to speak) on numerous other websites. One hour of the estimated preparation time is chilling time. Timing is based on buying (admittedly pricey)Dungeness crab meat. If buying cooked crabs and planning to extract crab meat yourself, add at least an hour.

    Recipe #207817

    13 Reviews |  By lazyme

    This is a recipe I came up with trying to duplicate my favorite omelet from an old local Seattle restaurant called the Steak and Eggs. I usually use leftover potatoes from Recipe #177125 and often times make this in the microwave with my microwave omelet maker.

    Recipe #202526

    This recipe comes from "Simply Seafood", a magazine published in Seattle in the late 70's-early 90's. Sadly, no longer in existence, it was one of the best sources of fish & seafood recipes, as well as the state of the fish industry. I've been unable to find a similar authentic recipe in any of my cookbooks, magazines, etc. I have spoken to Maltese friends who confirm the authenticity of the recipe. Maltese cuisine is influenced by Africa and, in this case, Italy. Clearly, fish and seafood play a key role in the regular meals of this island. The beauty of this recipe is that while it is described as baking, the dish starts with a relatively small amount of liquid and the tomatoes give up liquid as they soften and melt at the relatively low cooking temperature. Thus, this is more a braise than a bake and the fish retains or absorbs liquid as it cooks, thus staying moist. This is a very different style of tuna compared to the quick, high heat, "seared on the outside, rare on the inside" style. This recipe is quite forgiving: I have used frozen tuna steaks without defrosting them and cooked this in a slow cooker at low heat for 6 hours or at high heat for 4 hours: just add enough additional water so that the tuna stays moist. Also, if you're blessed with thick tuna steaks, whether baking or using a slow cooker, just add water as needed and keep the tuna moist until it cooks through ... Serve with a green salad and crusty bread. Wine along with the meal (or if you choose, added to the braising liquid) is a wonderful touch -- for the broth, you can use either white or red. For drinking, a Sicilian wine would match the Mediterranean island origin of the dish, but anything from southern Italy would be appropriate ... In additon to being a dinner, any leftovers can be served at room temperature or heated up for lunch ... Note that since the salt and pepper are "to taste", the nutritional analysis for sodium will be incorrect -- if you are on a no/low/restricted salt diet, beware!!

    Recipe #196221

    1 Reviews |  By PaulaG

    This recipe comes from Simply Classic, The Junior League of Seattle cookbook. I made some slight adjustments to the directions. This is an impressive dish served with rice pilaf or polenta and a green salad. Please note that the prep does allow for marinating the meat 24 hours.

    Recipe #194188

    6 Reviews |  By lazyme

    This is a refreshing drink from Winner's Restaurant in Seattle. The recipe ingredients should read Sweet and Sour MIXER, but zaar insists on sauce, lol.

    Recipe #190735

    2 Reviews |  By Mikekey

    From the local newspaper a few years ago. Good with the Turkey dinner, or baked ham dinner.

    Recipe #190716

    In 1962, the World's Fair was held in Seattle. A pasta was produced to be sold in grocery stores by the name "Space Noodles" after the new Seattle Space Needle. I took the recipe off the bag of pasta and tweaked it a bit to make a tasty lasagna. To this day it is still my brother's favorite lasagna.

    Recipe #190416

    This recipe is by Tamara Murphy of Seattle's Brasa Restaurant, via John Shields. Ms. Murphy says to be authentic, you should prepare the pesto in the Moroccan way, by pounding the ingredients in a mortar with a pestle. Food processor instructions are included for the modern cooks. Red snapper is also great in this recipe.

    Recipe #188872

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