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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / Pub Grub - Cheers and the Best of British!
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    Pub Grub - Cheers and the Best of British!

    Pub Grub - A selection of recipes that pubs specialise serving in Great Britain. Pies, Ploughman's Lunch, Fish'n'Chips, Steak and Chips, Pasties, Crumbles, Comforting Soups, Bangers and Mash, Toad in the Hole, Sticky Steamed and Baked Puddings and Decadant Desserts - they are all here in my collection of Pub Style recipes. Cheers and it's your round next!!
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    Classic and traditional British Pub Grub! Cooked prawns (shrimps) served in a pint mug with a tangy garlic mayonnaise and a pint of Guinness of course - my idea of heaven! British pub grub is justly famous and this simple dish is also great when served at home. Serve these prawns for family gatherings, or St Patrick's Day, St George's Day, St David's Day, St Andrew's Day, Australia Day, football, superbowl, darts matches or ANY time you fancy simple, robust food with a pint of ale! I have suggested Guinness but you can serve these prawns with any real ale or your favourite brew. I have spiced the mayonnaise up a tad - if you are not a lover of spicy food, serve these prawns with classic mayonnaise.

    Recipe #359858

    This was a quick throw it together Sunday Lunch pudding idea - raid the freezer for all the nearly used bags of frozen summer fruits, such as cherries, raspberries, blackcurrants, redcurrants, bilberries (blueberries), blackberries and strawberries. Fling them all into an ovenproof gratin dish; whizz up a shortbread crumble topping - and Bob's your uncle and Fanny's your aunt, as we say down our way!!!! We loved it, the combination of fruits was wonderful - and it is a great idea for using up whatever fruits you have lurking in your freezer. I am sure that fresh fruit would also be suitable. We like our fruits to be on the tart side - so pleased add sugar to taste! Serve the crumble with hot custard, cold custard, cream, ice cream, crème fraiche or whatever you fancy!

    Recipe #359834

    Call it what you will, traditional British cheese on toast is a national institution, an iconic snack enjoyed by all, regardless of class or background! What can be simpler and tastier, hunks of homemade or crusty farmhouse style bread topped with mature Cheddar cheese, a smidge of mustard and Worcestershire sauce for those who desire an extra kick! This is NOT really a recipe; it is a basic method for making a super tasty and nutritious fast food dish. There is even a Cheese on Toast Day celebrated in the UK - mark your calendars now, the last Thursday in April has been set aside for this comforting supper treat. I lived on cheese on toast whilst I was a student, as I am sure most students do nowadays! You can use other British cheeses, but I find the best cheese without a doubt, is a good mature farmhouse cheddar. Make sure your bread is thickly sliced and you have your plates ready and waiting to receive the molten cheesy snack - pull up a chair by the fireside in the winter and enjoy your 5-minute culinary efforts! (This is an all year around snack I hasten to add.) An interesting historical note; toasted cheese was served as the final course to male diners during Edwardian times, in Gentleman's Clubs........the cheese was melted and served in a pot with the toast set around the edges - a sort of Gentleman's Club fondue!

    Recipe #349789

    These classic Scottish bread rolls are so easy to make - with only one kneading required. They are soft with a distinctive floured finish and are excellent for all manner of fillings, but especially bacon or cheese and salad. These baps are quite wide without much height, and they must only be baked for a maximum of 10 minutes in order to maintain their soft texture. Preparation time includes the proving and kneading time. They are best eaten on the day that they are made - they are delicious toasted the next day however.

    Recipe #302697

    I am finally posting my recipe for Spotted Dick! This delicious steamed sponge pudding with currants is a British schoolboy favourite from the days when school dinners were not only tasty and nourishing, but may have been the only hot meal of the day for some children. Originally, Spotted Dick would have been made with beef suet and breadcrumbs - this recipe has been updated for modern tastes, and uses vegetarian suet or butter with flour. Serve this with English custard for a comforting and nostalgic flavour explosion! Steaming is so easy, and whilst it bubbles and simmers away, you are free to do other things around the kitchen, such as prepare the custard!

    Recipe #300482

    Yes really! This is a pan-fried version of bread and butter pudding, made in the method of a French toast sandwich! A wonderful recipe, which is just the ticket for a lazy weekend breakfast or brunch, OR as a mid-week quick and easy dessert. Although it is not necessary to stamp out the rounds of bread, it DOES look so much nicer - you can use the excess bread to make breadcrumbs for baking, I never seem to have enough! I have also made this recipe with sliced brioche, now that is TOTALLY delicious, especially when served as a dessert with jam, whipped cream or even custard! You can "lighten" this recipe very easily by using low fat cream, low fat spread and fat free milk, then spray the pan with low-fat cooking spray.

    Recipe #300509

    A traditional British steamed savoury pudding - fluffy dumping style suet pastry layered with tender and succulent braised beef steak - pure comfort food. Once you have prepared this, just let it steam quietly away in the background, whilst you get on with other things. Unmould this pudding at the table and serve it immediately with extra gravy, steamed seasonal greens and mounds of fluffy mashed potatoes. There is an urban myth in the UK, that men ask woman who can cook this delicious savoury pudding to marry them........be warned.......be careful! Preparation time includes the cooking of the beef steak before the pudding is made and steamed. (This recipe comes from my family's recipe collection - it was cooked regularly by my grandmother and my mum; the original recipe is written in pencil on a scrap of paper.........it was like finding real treasure!)

    Recipe #300631

    I have always prefered savoury food to sweet food, and this is a recipe I made up for a savoury version of one of my favourite sweet puddings, Bread and Butter Pudding. This savoury dish is easy to rustle up and makes a tasty supper, breakfast, brunch or lunch dish. Do try to use mature farmhouse Cheddar cheese, a little goes a long way as the flavour is so pronounced. This can be made the night before you need it, for breakfast or brunch, and then baked next morning - a great make ahead meal! NB: Do NOT use standard American style sandwich bread, it is too thin and will not crisp up!

    Recipe #301346

    I will not pretend that this pie is easy or quick to make, however, if you want to impress your friends or family with a sensational "posh" English raised pie then this is the recipe for you! Tender chunks of chicken with pork sausage meat and ham are encased in crisp hot water crust pastry, liberally seasoned with spices and herbs; this pie makes a simply stunning centrepiece for any Glyndebourne style picnic event or for a special celebratory cold buffet, such as weddings, christenings or anniversaries. The pastry used in this pie recipe is hot water crust pastry, which is a direct descendant of "coffer" paste that was used to encase and protect meat whilst it cooked centuries ago – the pies then being called “coffyns”! The pastry is shaped by hand whilst it is still warm, and is excellent for using with intricate pie moulds - the technique is known as "hand raised" and pies made this way are called "raised pies". The pastry is easy to make, but MUST be kept warm whilst you are using it - I keep mine warm over a pan of simmering water. This pastry is excellent for all types of traditional raised pies, such as Game pies, Pork pies and Veal and Ham pies. (Preparation time includes the one day needed for the pie to cool down and then for jellied stock to be added, and then allowing for the jellied stock to set.)

    Recipe #292563

    A real old fashioned British style "Doorstep" sandwich, jazzed up a wee bit by adding chutney with mayonnaise and then toasting it........just delicious! The only criteria for these toasted "sarnies" is that you use THICK slices of good quality white Farmhouse style bread; such as home-made or Artisanal crusty bread! And, a good quality Cheddar cheese - preferably mature with good mayonnaise and tangy chutney! Although I have given the method for grilling (broiling) these sarnies, they'll be fine if they're made in an electric sandwich or grilling machine, such as a George Foreman. There is no need to add the chutney separately then, just add it to the cheese and mayonnaise mixture. This is a recipe for one greedy person - please increase the quantities for more greedy people if necessary!!

    Recipe #294857

    A delicious and traditional English style artisanal mustard made with good English ale and garlic; the type of mustard that is so expensive to buy in the supermarkets. Home-made mustard is easy to make and very satisfying, as you can add special ingredients to suit your taste. This mustard is wonderful served with all manner of pies, pasties and savoury pastries, as well as cold meats, steaks, roasts and sausages. It is a quick maturing mustard, and is ready to eat in two weeks. Makes an ideal gift, especially for men and BBQ fanatics!

    Recipe #291096

    In the UK, we have a famous old rhyme and ditty that goes like this...."Apple pie without cheese, is like a kiss without a squeeze"!! This is my traditional English double crust apple pie WITH a kiss that HAS a squeeze - the CHEESE! Don't worry if you are not a cheese lover, (is there anyone out there who is NOT a cheese lover???) as this pie has the cheese on the SIDE - so you can have your apple pie with cheese or without, it's up to you! This is a tried and tested old family recipe and is based on the pastry and pie recipes in the Be-Ro cookbook. It is wonderful eaten hot with cream, custard or ice cream, as well as with the cheese; and it is an absolute must for lunch boxes and picnics! An interesting historical note - English Apple Pie in one form or another, goes right back to the time of Chaucer in the 12th century. Apple pie should have meltingly crisp and VERY short pastry with layers of spiced apples, preferably Bramley apples, in the middle. If you have a pie funnel, such as a black bird pie funnel - use that for a really traditional touch, as well as directing the steam out of the pie! I have a mixed spice mixture posted on zaar, Recipe #266688. I also have a spiced apple pie sugar posted, Recipe #219453. Replace this for the cup of sugar and the mixed spice listed in this recipe, and omit the lemon rind.

    Recipe #285538

    Lots of you who know me very well on Recipezaar will know of my love and research into Historical recipes, traditions, culture and food; this Toasted Cheese recipe is the first in a series of Regency recipes that I will be posting! I always like to make any recipe that I post at least twice, and this one is a real cracker in my humble opinion! Jane Austen is known to have said.... "We were greatly surprised by Edward Bridge's company...It is impossible to do justice to the hospitatlity of his attentions towards me; he made a point of ordering toasted cheese for supper, entirely on my account." --Jane Austen-- 27 August, 1805. This is a classic regency dish - often served AFTER a heavy meal and before the dessert! It was more often than not called Toasted Cheese, but is also known as Scotch or Welsh Rarebit. The original recipe was written like this: "Toasted Cheese - Grate the cheese and add it to one egg, a teaspoonful of mustard, and a little butter. Send it up on toast, or in paper trays". I have amended the orginal recipe for today's quantities, ingredients and cooking methods!! NB: In 1747, a cookery book gave a recipe for "Scots Rabbit" or Rare Bit as bread toasted on both sides and a slice of cheese, the same size as the bread, also toasted on both sides and laid on the buttered bread. The same book had "Welsh Rabbit" made in the same way but with mustard rubbed on the cheese. "English Rabbit" on the other hand had a glass of red wine poured over the toast before the cheese was added. Take your pick!

    Recipe #284924

    There can be nothing more comforting then a pile of golden, crispy, crunchy roast potatoes! Roasties, as we call them in Great Britain, are traditionally served with Sunday Lunch - but, DON'T wait until Sunday to serve them, they are great with just about everything! I remember going to our local pub in North Yorkshire, and if the visiting darts team was playing, half way through the evening the landlady would come around with trays upon trays of crunchy, piping hot roasties - sprinkled with salt--unbelievably sublime! The secret to making perfect roast potatoes is simple; par-boil them first and give them a really good shake in the pan before placing them into SIZZLING HOT fat and turning them over. Serve them piping hot and crisp from the oven with lashings of gravy and sea salt, and they are a meal in themselves. Ingredient quantities are not by weight, but by potatoes per head - and a VERY generous amount as well! Please adjust the quantities to your suit own requirements.

    Recipe #264234

    Possibly the most famous of all English dishes, traditionally served for the "big" family meal of the week, Sunday Lunch. First a little about the Yorkshire Pudding. Different areas of England cook, serve and eat this in totally different ways. No single way is 'right' nor 'wrong'. It depends upon your family tradition and where you live. Originally the Yorkshire Pudding was eaten on its own as a first course with thick gravy. This was to fill your stomach with the cheap Yorkshire Pudding so that you would not eat so much of the more expensive meat in the next course. Now Yorkshire Puddings tend to be lighter and crispier and they are served and eaten with the meat course, with lashings of beef gravy with them! How to serve the roast beef: Some families carve the meat in the kitchen and bring it to the table on pre-warmed plates. Others carve the meat at the table so every one can see, that is how my Dad used to do it! Roast Beef is best served with roast potatoes, and a selection of freshly steamed seasonal vegetables, such as carrots, cabbage and broccoli. Have a gravy boat brimming full of gravy for diners to help themselves to. For special occasions consider making the gravy with a glass or two of wine! I have posted this recipe for 8 to 10 people; I always feel it's worth cooking more than you need, as you can have cold roast beef sandwiches for tea and of course make cottage pie the next day! The Yorkshire pudding listed below is already posted on Zaar - Recipe #203349, but I have added it here again, so you can cook them with the beef, following only one recipe for ease. My Mum's Yorkshire pudding recipe is simple, as long as all the ratio of measurements are equal, you can increase or decrease the amount of puddings you make!

    Recipe #263751

    A basic and yet delicious traditional gravy to serve with all your roast dinners! This gravy is also wonderful if served with sausages for "Bangers and Mash", as well as Yorkshire Puddings. It also makes an ideal base for Shepherd's pie or Cottage pie, and all manner of stews and casseroles. There are variations to the basic gravy listed at the end of the recipe, depending on what type of roast meat you are serving. This recipe has been taken from Delia Smith's How to Cook Book one.

    Recipe #263755

    This is the soup I make after I have baked my Recipe #262247. This soup uses split peas, but you can just as easily use yellow or red split lentils instead (same weight and cooking instructions). Many old style recipes require that the split peas are soaked overnight before starting recipes but this is not normally necessary nowadays. However, be sure to read the packet instructions carefully. If the split peas are soaked overnight their cooking time can be reduced to around 40 minutes. This recipe does not require overnight soaking however. If you have made my Recipe #262247, you will not need to add the vegetables listed here - unless you want extra vegetables, as the stock will already contain them. The cooking time will then depend on the split peas or lentils only. This serves 4 hungry people in large, deep soup bowls as a main course soup dish. It is wonderful with crusty bread rolls or baguette. This also makes a fabulous soup to take on a picnic in the Autumn or Winter, just what the doctor ordered!

    Recipe #262734

    Cottage pie, like its opposite lamb number, Shepherd's pie, was the ingenious idea of housewives many years ago, in order to create another warm and comforting meal usually from the Sunday Lunch left-overs! Cooked beef or lamb were diced or shredded and sometimes the vegetables were added to the meat mixture - such as peas or carrots. This recipe uses raw minced beef, but you could use minced cooked beef if you wish, I have added it as an alternative. The leeks were always added to the mashed potato topping when I was growing up - it was another way of utilising the leftovers! A bit like a Bubble and Squeak topping. I am not a lover of peas being added in my Cottage Pie, so I have suggested them as an option - I always prefer carrots as the vegetable to be added. Try to use mature Farmhouse Cheddar cheese for the topping - a little goes a long way, as it is so strong in flavour. The cheese is very luxurious, but takes this simple and comforting pie to a higher taste level, in my humble opinion! Serve bubbling hot straight from the oven with steamed cabbage, carrots or any seasonal vegetables and a jug of gravy.

    Recipe #257812

    I make this so often, that I thought it was about time I posted the recipe! This amusingly named dish is basically traditional British fried leftovers, and probably enjoyed more than the original vegetables were I think! In fact, I have been known to cook the vegetables in order to make the Bubble and Squeak! The name is thought to originate from the noise it makes whilst cooking in the frying pan - bubbling and squeaking, whatver the reason, this simple dish is delicious and a wonderful way to "fry up" your leftover spuds and greens! I like to season mine with lots of freshly ground black pepper. This is a traditional post-Christmas breakfast dish - but don't wait until then to make this. Excellent if served as part of an English breakfast with bacon and eggs, or as a light supper dish.

    Recipe #256493

    This is such a wonderful and traditional English recipe for Hallowe'en - All Hallow's Eve! It was a dish traditionally served to unmarried guests with a ring hidden inside. Whoever found the ring would be the next one to be married! This delicious mashed potato has nine ingredients in it - hence its name. Serve it as a supper dish by itself, or as an accompaniment to bangers/sausages, for a comforting Autumn supper dish! For those whom may be interested, a brief history on the origins of Hallowe'en: In ancient Britain this date was the pre-Christian eve of the New Year and Celtic Harvest Festival, when the souls of the dead were thought to revisit their homes to eat and drink. People left refreshments on the table and unlocked their doors before retiring for the night, then bells were rung, fires lit to guide the returning souls back to earth and animals were brought in for the winter. After Hallowe'en became a Christian festival, supernatural associations continued to thrive. It was believed that witches were abroad and that it was possible for certain people to perform magic and summon up spirits. Hallowe'en was once a time for making mischief - many parts of England still recognise this date as Mischief Night - when children would knock on doors demanding a treat (Trick or Treat) and people would disguise themselves as witches, ghosts, kelpies and spunkies, in order to obtain food and money from nervous householders. In certain parts of England youths still play pranks on their neighbours by hiding garden ornaments, whitewashing walls and ringing doorbells in the dead of night.

    Recipe #254835

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