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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / Paddington Bear Recipes - I need a Home! Recipes with No reviews
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    43 recipes in

    Paddington Bear Recipes - I need a Home! Recipes with No reviews

    Recipes which need more homes and reviews please! Some are saved in so many people's cookbooks - but they have NEVER had a review! Anyway, take your pick - they are ALL good, honestly! I hopefully will not be adding to this cookbook too many times!
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    This was the first thing I was taught to make at secondary school in Domestic Science! We were all taught to make basic lemon syrup for the fruit salad, a great classic and a standard recipe that I have never forgotten! However, here I have deviated a little and have taken advantage of some excellent local peach syrup instead of the homemade lemon syrup I usually make; and I have garnished the salad with mint and angelica from my herb garden. I have suggested certain fruits to use, but the beauty of a fresh fruit salad is that you can always rustle one up with whatever you have locally and to hand. Serve with fresh pouring cream for a real treat!

    Recipe #383182

    Jersey is the largest of the Channel Islands.The island is usually the hottest place in the British Isles during the summer months, with the temperature averaging a few degrees higher than the mainland. As the island is neither part of the EU or the UK, it is a popular 'duty-free' destination. Jersey has a rich and varied history, with several wars and invasion attempts over many centuries.The island was part of the Duchy of Normandy in the 10th century and became part of the Anglo-Norman realm in 1066. The island's history is reflected in the French road names and typical Jersey surnames, as well as in the many historical French artefacts and monuments that can be found around the island. This is a traditional recipe, and no self-respecting Jersey woman would be without her earthenware bean crock, or casserole, in which to cook one of the most filling and tasty of all the island's recipes. So popular was this bean dish that every farmhouse had its bundles of drying French beans hanging from the rafters waiting to be shelled in the long winter evenings. Town folk used to hang their beans in the garage. For some Islanders this was a traditional supper dish; others had it for Sunday breakfast. Mr. Heinz is supposed to have taken the idea for his famous baked beans from the bean crock of Jersey emigrants in Canada. Prep time includes the overnight soaking for the beans. (This adapted recipe is originally from the Jersey Tourism Website.)

    Recipe #388262

    Delicate pink shrimps nestled in spiced butter that are packed into earthenware pots, and sealed with golden clarified butter - quintessential British fare that is tinged with timeless elegance of an old-fashioned Seaside teatime treat! Although Morecambe Bay in the North West of England is most famous for its potted shrimps, I remember these amazing Yorkshire Shrimp Teas from my childhood; you would see signs outside country cottages and farmhouses along the Yorkshire coastline near Scarborough and Whitby. Potted shrimps are traditionally served with hot toast and lashings of hot (preferably Yorkshire) tea! Serve these potted shrimp as appetisers, or for a real “Yorkshire Shrimp Tea” - with hot buttered toast, fresh lemon wedges and a pot of tea. This recipe is based on a 19th century recipe found in an old country cookbook, which I bought in an antique bookshop in England. (Prep time includes chilling time.)

    Recipe #388364

    This is a really easy ice cream to whip up and one that I make every Christmas to go with the Christmas pudding and with my annual Rumtopf or Brandied Cherries and Apricots. You can make it in an ice cream maker if you have one, but as it is a non-custard base ice cream, it works just as well without an ice cream maker. It lasts for one month in the freezer and is a great addition to the summer dining table too!

    Recipe #401893

    Whether you have just come of the ski slopes or you are wandering around a French Marché de Noël, a Christmas Market, this is JUST the beverage to warm the cockles of your heart, as well as your frozen fingers and toes! Vin chaud is hot-spiced wine served the French way, with a slug of Cognac of course! It's a traditional welcome drink and is very popular where I live in the South West of France; especially at Christmas and New Year – and you’ll find it in all of the Christmas Markets at this time of year. Ladle this mulled wine into some heavy cut-glass punch cups; or for a real French feel, use an assortment of old wine glasses and to avoid them cracking, place a teaspoon in to the glasses beforehand - this takes the heat away from the glass. One word about the wine, please DO use a good wine, and not what is known as a "cooking wine" - I find that Beaujolais works well or a fruity Chinon.

    Recipe #401846

    A fabulous wilted salad boasting the rich, festive colours of vibrant crimson reds and lush holly greens, as well as being full of flavour - this is simply a wonderful salad for the Christmas, New Year or Thanksgiving family table. Please do use any blue cheese or ham of your choice; Stilton or Roquefort would be lovely as well as Prosciutto or Bayonne ham.......and, if you are serving any vegetarians, just leave the ham out of the equation! The dressing can be made up a few hours or a day beforehand, just wilt the leaves and assemble the salad right before serving. Serve this salad with crusty rolls or some thinly sliced rye bread and a glass of chilled Rosé or Chardonnay.

    Recipe #401862

    A delectable holiday fudge, which is the ultimate treat for anyone with a sweet tooth. This buttery, crumbly fudge is enhanced and made more festive by studding it with rich, jewel-like fruit. If you do not have stem ginger handy, you can use crystallised ginger or glace ginger instead. Making fudge the proper way involves using a sugar, jam or candy thermometer - or you can use the "soft ball" method if you do not have a suitable thermometer. Drop a small spoonful of the fudge into cold water, if it forms a malleable soft ball, the setting temperature has been reached. If you plan to make this fudge for gifts or to sell, pack the squares into attractive cellophane bags, glass jars or boxes and add a pretty ribbon as well as a label of ingredients. This recipe is part of my Old Fashioned Sweet Shop collection of recipes, sweets, candies, fudges, sugar plums and chocolates!

    Recipe #402077

    A delightful and EASY scone recipe that is perfect for a proper afternoon tea or to take on a picnic. Dried sour cherries are sensational and give a deep essence of cherry flavour to these scones, whilst the buttermilk makes them light and airy. This is a casual eating scone, easy to rustle up, and is perfect when eaten fresh from the oven with butter and maybe some cherry jam and cream too! If taking on a picnic, wrap the scone in a clean tea towel to keep it warm and pack the butter and jam separately. Makes one large scone, which is marked to split into wedges when served.

    Recipe #408471

    Roasted pumpkin and creamy cheese lasagne (lasagna); a Boxing Day special - although I have made this for Christmas Eve too! This is a wonderful addition to the festive vegetarian table, but is ALSO hugely popular with meat eaters. This is my adapted version of Nigella Lawson's pumpkin lasagne; I have changed a few of the methods and added (as well as omitted) a few ingredients! Boxing day is the day after Christmas day, also called St Stephen’s Day – the 26th December; it is a public holiday in the UK and most Commonwealth countries……….generally a turkey curry day, or a turkey-free day, one of the two! Serve this with a large bowl of salad and some crusty bread for mopping up the delicious sauce.

    Recipe #403973

    A wonderful stuffing recipe for your turkey or indeed lamb, beef or game birds - this is baked in a bread (loaf) tin and looks very impressive when turned out, as well as being easy to slice and serve. It can also be served as an alternative type of "meatloaf" with salad, pickles and chutneys........or even better, in sandwiches. I have also made this as a vegetarian option, leaving out the sausage meat and adding more breadcrumbs to the stuffing loaf.

    Recipe #404303

    An old-fashioned treat, this is a fabulous way to use up left over ham, although I have also put some freshly cooked ham aside especially for this when I have baked a ham for Christmas, Easter or another special occasion. The ham is finely minced and mixed through with old-fashioned spices and butter, and it keeps for several weeks in a cool place. Another name for this recipe is Potted Meat, and it was VERY popular in Victorian times, although recipes for potted meats (preserved under butter) goes back even further than that historically. Wonderful in sandwiches for the teatime table or for picnics, lunch boxes and festive buffets. This is an adapted recipe from Mrs Beeton’s Book of Household Management, where she suggests that this is a nice addition for the “Breakfast or Luncheon table”. Serve with sliced breads of all types, oatcakes, toast, bread rolls, and crackers or with salad, chutneys, mustard and pickles. NB: Use a good cooked ham on the bone for this recipe: the sort carved by hand at the deli and old-fashioned butchers. So called "cooking time" is chill time.

    Recipe #408287

    Freshly boiled eggs are encased in a herb flavoured sausage “jacket” and are then deep-fried until golden and crisp, delicious! Contrary to popular belief, Scotch eggs are not Scottish, and they were actually invented by the famous London department store “Fortnum & Mason” in 1738, where they are still available today. The word "Scotch" is an old English word meaning to chop or mince, and obviously, the eggs are covered with “chopped or minced” pork sausage meat, hence the name Scotch Eggs. They are traditional British picnic food but I also like to serve them as a light lunch or snack, and they make a wonderful addition to the buffet table. These tasty traditional English specialities have had bad press over the years; mainly down to commercial mass production, but if you make them at home with fresh, free-range eggs and the best quality sausage meat, they will taste divine, and they will always be the stars of the picnic hamper or family lunch table! PLEASE use high quality sausage meat or sausages, with at least 70% meat content.Historical Note: Founded in 1707, Fortnum & Mason (F&M) stocks "food fit for a queen". The 300-year-old British department store, famous for its jams, teas, and sauces, provides the Queen with her annual supply of Christmas puddings and holds the "Royal Warrant. NB: You can use quail's eggs with great results too - perfect for an elegant appetiser or starter. (The optional mixed spice is for those who like a spicy meat coating, it is mentioned in some old recipes, but I don't always use it.)

    Recipe #408043

    This recipe was made from leftovers and has been requested again ALREADY by Malcolm, my husband! Cooked chicken is mixed with smoky, hot chorizo sausage and folded through a chipotle chilli tomato sauce..........sounds too hot?! I then added some sweet corn, sour cream and a jar of mild salsa to calm it down a bit, but please DO use hot salsa if you like a little spice in your life! I topped this with a dollop of sour cream and dressed it with chopped jalapeno peppers, parsley and a little chopped coriander (cilantro) for a perfect cold weather lunch. I devised this recipe especially for the Two for One Leftovers event in the Cooking Photo's Forum. Please adjust the chilli powder to your own requirements. I like spicy food but Malcolm does not, so I topped mine with loads of chopped jalapeno peppers and a sprinkling of chipotle chilli powder!! NB: I used Spanish chorizo sausage, which is cured; if you are using fresh chorizo sausage, it needs to be browned beforehand.(I made this original recipe with leftovers from KissKiss's Recipe #368069. However, ANY cooked chicken will do for this!) NOTE on adding water to salsa: My salsa was VERY thick and adding the water made it much better when baked; if your salsa is a very runny one already, do not add the water!

    Recipe #407666

    This is MY much adapted version of Jamie Oliver's Turkey and Sweet Leek Pie! I made this with left over Christmas turkey this year, and it was so delicious and went down a bomb with my family and friends! A new Jamie Oliver recipe that he showed on his Family Christmas show this year and one that is so clever, as this pie makes its own gravy! I have left out adding the chestnuts and sage to the pastry as he suggests, I will try it sometime in the future though, as it sounds a brilliant idea; I have added this option at the end of the recipe however, for those who want to try it that way. Serve this with mashed potatoes and the extra gravy in a gravy boat on the side. Here is what Jamie says about this pie: "This is dead simple, completely versatile and absolutely gorgeous. It’s not a pretty-boy pie; it’s a proper, old-school pie that everyone will be over the moon to see on the table. I’m putting leftover white turkey meat to good use here, but you could also mix brown meat in there too." I agree, all of my family and friends were over the moon to see this on the post Christmas table, I bet it tastes great with chicken and ham too. NB: he original recipe makes enough for 6 to 8 people, mine is perfect for 4 very hungry people!

    Recipe #407306

    Garlicky buttered snails served in little light vol-au-vent cases, what a treat for all snail lovers! Living in France gives me access to some wonderful escargots, as well as superb garlic and butter too. These are just brilliant when served as appetisers for New Year or any other festive gathering. The beauty of these over the classic snails served in a baker or in their shells, is that you can eat the WHOLE thing! EVERY single bit of that naughty but exceedingly nice garlic and herb butter, all in one amazing mouthful! If you are unable to get hold of mini vol-au-vents, I have posted an alternative way to make your own little puff pastry cases, using readymade pastry for ease of preparation! Allow 2 to 3 per person if these are being served with other nibbles and appetisers. (Prep time includes baking the cases if not using readymade vol-au-vent cases.)

    Recipe #405022

    Delightful and EASY little smoked salmon and cucumber appetisers, and healthy too, with NO pastry! These are a breeze to make but they tick all the taste boxes, as well as being elegant. Cucumbers do vary in size, and I have suggested a medium cucumber, which is about 10" to 12" long.........however, any size will do!! Adjust the crème fraiche to how many cups you yield from a cucumber, I managed to make 30 cups and used 10 tablespoons of crème fraîche for that amount, 1 teaspoon per cup. Serve these with cocktails and pre-dinner drinks, or as part of a buffet. The cucumber cups and crème fraîche can be prepared beforehand, but these should only be assembled 1 hour before serving (at the most) and covered in cling film to ensure the smoked salmon does not dry out. Allow 2 to 4 per person, depending on what else is served.

    Recipe #404994

    Make your own brandy butter to smother over delicious, homemade Christmas Figgy or Plum pudding, and in only 5 minutes with this easy recipe,..........no Christmas table would be without this "naughty but nice" accompaniment! This is also wonderful when served with hot mince pies......prise open the pastry lids and dollop some brandy butter inside, preferably when they are warm, so the brandy butter runs through the pies! This makes a great gift - pack the brand butter into an attractive pot and add serving instructions. .

    Recipe #404338

    A delightful old French salad recipe, which uses fresh aromatic herbs with fresh lettuce leaves and a simple dressing. Serve this with poached salmon or cold chicken for an elegant dinner party dish. Adapted from a 16th century French translation of a book originally written in Latin in 1474. NB: Borage is an excellent culinary herb and can be used in a variety of ways. Borage is far better used fresh, as the flavour and colour deteriorate when dried and some essential oils lost. Traditional recipes recommend borage leaves and seeds, together with fennel in salads for increasing the milk supply in nursing mothers. The leaves and flowers are still added for flavour and garnish to wine cups, Pimms and gin-based summer cocktails and the flowers are still candied for confectionary as cake and ice cream decorations.

    Recipe #381683

    This fruit salad is amazing, and all the more for the addition of bergamot leaves and flowers! The fragrant leaves of this versatile herb delicately flavour the syrup whilst the gorgeous shaggy red flowers and scented pelargonium leaves decorate it for the final finishing flourish! If you are a lover of Earl Gray tea, you will instantly recognise the flavour of this herb, as it is used to flavour this famous and popular tea blend. NOTE: Bergamot, often referred to as bee balm, became distinguished as "Oswego Tea" when a Quaker botanist, John Bartram, sampled a tea made from the leaves. A Bergamot lemon is a small yellow sour citrus fruit similar to an orange, mostly cultivated in Calabria in Italy. The rind contains an essential oil used in perfumery (the basis for eau-de-cologne), confectionary and Earl Grey tea. The zest is also used in pâtisserie. NB: Prep time includes cooling time.

    Recipe #381682

    A quick and easy home-made honey recipe from the Auberge in South West France! I use lavender honey so much in my cooking, that I thought it was about time I made my own - given that I have about 30 lavender bushes! As well as giving an amazing and subtle flavour to your recipes, it also makes a wonderful gift for a fellow foodie. I plan on making my own lavender honey all the time now, as even in France, it is quite expensive to buy. You can increase the quantities to make more jars - just remember to keep the flower to honey ratio the same.

    Recipe #379821

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