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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / North African and Middle East ZWT VI
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    11 recipes in

    North African and Middle East ZWT VI


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    Brigitte Bardot (for those of you who don't know she was an old French actress who was a vegetarian) loved this tabbouleh salad which is closer to a couscous dish. You can try it if you liked her, or you can try it because it tastes awesome! Minty, lemony and absolutely refreshing. Good for picnics. Refrigeration time is not included in prep time. From today's Sunday NY Times.

    Recipe #194136

    Browned butter is the secret force in Turkish cooking, says Ms. Akin, an expert in Ottoman palace cuisine. This is from a cooking column by Melissa Clark in the 12/5 edition of the New York Times. I reduced the oil and butter (or will as soon as I make this recipe). Use 1 and 4 tablespoons, respectively, if you'd prefer.

    Recipe #274196

    No such thing as too many chickpea salads! This was an especially good version I thought, altered a bit with my own and my BF's taste in mind. Extremely easy and no cooking involved, particularly good for lunch at the office or a weekend picnic since it's best at room temperature. If you'd like to make this for a no-cook summer dinner, it's a main meal for two (with a side of green vegetables) or a side dish for four. A Sara Foster recipe from the 4/2007 version of Cottage Living.

    Recipe #220871

    Try feeding your family some foul mud tonight! The name may be off-putting, but the taste is not. Foul Mudammas is a middle eastern recipe based on a dish available at Alfanoose, a gem of a restaurant in the financial district in Manhattan, where you'll find all the suits from Wall Street lined up for their weekday fix. This dish may or may not be authentic, but the guy who runs this place (and his wife who developed this recipe) are definitely Arabic. Serve as side dish or for lunch in a pita bread. I recommend using the roasted garlic - instructions for how to roast garlic can be found elsewhere on Recipezaar. Using raw garlic will give it more of a bite but won't make it as aromatic. Letting this soak overnight improves the flavor but that's optional.

    Recipe #133315

    Posted for Zaar World Tour 2005. Oranges and bananas are a great combo, and I like the idea of adding some sweet red wine to a fruit salad! From The Jewish Vegetarian Year Cookbook. Have not tried this recipe yet.

    Recipe #134914

    Green beans and tomatoes are a terrific combination which I found out when my BF and I ordered this dish at a middle eastern restaurant a few years ago. It can be found in Italian cuisine as well but I prefer the middle eastern (Lebanese) variety. This is a meatless version which I adapted from a recipe off the internet and like to serve over rice or couscous, making a light meal or more substantial side dish. The idea is to cook until the beans are in between soft and crisp so they have a nice consistency that goes well with the tomatoes. If you have no problem with inauthenticity, sprinkle with parmesan cheese too and you'll get the best of both worlds.

    Recipe #114217

    One of the best vegetable soups I've had in ages! Extremely easy to make and very cheap (leave out the saffron if you don't already have any)! This lemony, peppery soup is traditionally enjoyed at the end of a day of fasting during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan. This is a vegetarian version of the thick and aromatic soup. More like a stew. From the 2/2007 issue of Canadian House & Home.

    Recipe #211997

    An Israeli dish served at Ori Apple, a hummus restaurant on St. Marks Place in Lower Manhattan. An "eat anytime" dish. From an article in the Wednesday food section of the New York Times.

    Recipe #179597

    Salty and lemony and low-cal and very good for you! From the December 2007 issue of Cottage Living. Prettiest with red and white cabbage, but you could use one or the other as I've noticed that "small" heads of cabbage are hard to find. One medium head of either cabbage will work too. You might want to let the flavors mix in the fridge overnight, but the recipe didn't call for it:D Really great for a picnic!

    Recipe #268332

    An Iranian recipe, originally from the Gilaneh restaurant in Tehran. This is eaten almost on a daily basis in northern Iran, often served with eggs and rice. Part of the secret to this dish lies in the lavish amount of butter, but don't worry too much about excess fat, as some of it gets drained off at the end. From today's NY Times courtesy of Elaine Louie, The Temporary Vegetarian. Save the excess liquid as part of a start of a stock base for soup, because it's quite good. I served this with rice. BF and I both liked it:)

    Recipe #389524

    This recipe was developed in 1980 and appeared in an article in The Times by Craig Claiborne. It was reprinted recently. Olives and oranges, the article said, are one of those miracle combinations before which one should should bow in gratitude. :) Kalamata olives would be great for this.

    Recipe #420506


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