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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / North Africa & Middle East Tag
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    21 recipes in

    North Africa & Middle East Tag

    These recipes are for N.A.M.E. Tag - a Recipe game in the North Africa and Middle Eastern Forum. The beautiful photo on the cover of this cookbook was taken by Fairy Nuff!
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    Summer is the perfect time for this healthy dessert salad! Choose ripe and heavy fruit for the best results. Salad needs to marinate for at least two hours for best results, so plan accordingly.

    Recipe #172591

    This wonderful shrimp recipe is by Nadia Roden from Party By the Pyramids. It is healthy and super fast. If you have all of the ingredients ready ahead of time, you can prepare the dish quickly, as guests arrive.

    Recipe #140689

    A puree of parsley and scallions mixed with lemon juice and oil both flavors the couscous and acts as a sauce for the fish. The taste of flat-leaf parsley really comes through if you use the flat-leaf variety. Any mild-tasting fish fillets will go well with the relatively delicate sauce. Try lake perch, whiting, croaker, drum, or bass, or of course, any of the flounder family, such as lemon or gray sole. Variation: Flounder with Basil and Parsley Couscous - Make the herb puree with 1/4 cup fresh basil and 1/2 cup flat-leaf parsley leaves. Wine: Match the tartness of the lemon juice with an acidic white wine. Try a good-quality Soave or Orvieto from Italy. From African Quick From Scratch Fish & Shellfish, Food & Wine.

    Recipe #140865

    Dress up that ordinary grilled chicken to create an exotic Mediterranean meal that will excite your family and friends. These 4 marinades will transform your menu into an international culinary delight. Whether you use whole butterflied poussins, game hens, broiler halves, chicken parts or boneless chicken cubes on skewers, you will find the following marinades intensely flavorful. Marinate the meat overnight in the refrigerator and bring to room temperature before cooking. If you like, thread blanched vegetables such as sweet pepper and onion chunks, onto skewers and cook alongside the chicken (or thread them on the same skewers). Serve the chicken with fresh lemon wedges and a traditional side dish or salad with bread or pitas and watch it disappear. Cooking times vary.I have been told the Egyptian marinade is especially good on whole butterflied squab (pigeon). I adjusted the amount of lemon juice in the Lebanese marinade if you love lemon, go for the 1/2 a cup.... if lemon is just "okay" stick with the 1/4 cup.

    Recipe #127262

    Here's a unique and refreshing pasta salad from Food and Wine with flavors reminiscent of Morocco and Southern Italy, where oranges and black olives are often paired. Wine: A white or rosé wine from Provence or the Languedoc-Roussillon region of France makes sense with this; either will pair well with the mint and the salty olive tastes of the dish.

    Recipe #140684

    These crisp potato pancakes come from the Brombergs' grandmother, Martha Finkelstein, who insisted that there is no flavor substitute for schmaltz (rendered chicken fat). Schmaltz is available at kosher delicatessens. MAKE AHEAD: The latkes can be fried early in the day and re-crisped on a baking sheet in a 350° oven. NOTES To make schmaltz, use the large clumps of fat from the neck, body cavity, and from under the skin. In a small, heavy saucepan, cook the fat over low heat until completely melted. Cool, then strain the clear fat into a glass jar and refrigerate for up to 1 week or freeze. Vanilla Applesauce makes 2 1/2 cups and can be refrigerated for up to 1 week.

    Recipe #134042

    This delicious dip is actually a healthy and quick appetiser that can be made a day or two ahead of time. The recipe is based on one from Alex Raij, chef of a tiny tapas bar, Tía Pol, in New York City. WINE: We enjoyed these tapas accompanied by a dry Riesling and I was quite surprised at the great match. The walnuts and the chili pepper's flavors were actually heightened and enjoyable. Try a 2005 Riesling Firestone Vineyard Select or a fruity, off-dry Riesling like 1999 Kiona White Riesling.

    Recipe #150234

    This wonderful African dish was adapted from Matthew Kenney's Mediterranean Cooking (Chronicle Books). WINE: 1996 Ravenswood Vintners Blend Zinfandel. This lightly spicy American wine will be a nice addition to the rich and slightly spicy chicken.

    Recipe #140688

    The Egyptian spice blend known as dukka includes toasted ground cumin, coriander and sesame seeds; Sortun gives it a twist by adding toasted coconut. The carrot dish here is traditionally eaten by first dipping bread in oil and then in the dukka before spooning the puree on top. It’s typical of North Africa’s qimia--a version of tapas or meze. Harissa is a fiery Tunisian spice paste. It is available in jars and tubes at many specialty food shops. If you cant find it, i have read that you can sub chili garlic paste or other hot sauce, but I bet the harissa is much better. MAKE AHEAD: The recipe can be prepared up to 2 days ahead. Refrigerate the carrots and store the spice mixture at room temperature.

    Recipe #133830

    Fritters are very popular in the Middle East. They are eaten hot or at room temperature as a vegetable side dish or a meze. It couldn’t be simpler to make, but you can dress it up with optional garnishes of black olives, tomatoes, or hard-boiled egg. The perfect use for small, sweet new zucchini. Serve alone or with a creamy garlic-lemon yogurt sauce for a perfect complement to any spicy or grilled foods that call for a cooling accompaniment.

    Recipe #127269

    These succulent crab cakes and the accompanying cilantro dressing are adapted from Matthew Kenney's Mediterranean Cooking (Chronicle Books). The Cilantro-Orange Dressing makes about One Cup. The dressing can be refrigerated for up to 4 hours. Let return to room temperature before serving.

    Recipe #140685

    This delicious vegetable recipe is a great side dish for entertaining because you can serve it warm, at room temperature or even slightly chilled. And it goes with almost any main course, from beef to chicken to fish. MAKE AHEAD: The carrots can be prepared early in the day and kept at room temperature or refrigerated. From Anissa Helou and the Couscous Chronicles, Food and Wine, March 2005.

    Recipe #140561

    A great variation of an old traditonal favorite. Suggestions: Cook the onions until they are fairly crisp and add a bit of lox to the skillet as you are frying the eggs and some dill toward the end for a perfectly fabulous dish. Decrease the salt if you add lox.

    Recipe #133937

    The small amount of beef in these artichoke meatballs helps hold them together. If artichokes are unavailable, substitute plain mashed potatoes. Canned or Jarred artichokes will save a lot time. This recipe is by Nancy Harmon Jenkins from the Devine Secrets of the Mahjoub Sisterhood, North Africa. Note: Tabil is made with onions and garlic dried in the strong Tunisian sun. For a close approximation, toast 3 tablespoons of caraway seeds, 1/2 cup of coriander seeds and 3 seeded dried red chiles in a large skillet over low heat until fragrant, about 2 minutes. Let cool, then grind the mixture to a powder. Store the tabil in a jar in a cool, dry place for up to 2 weeks. MAKE AHEAD: The meatballs can be fried up to 6 hours ahead and kept at room temperature. Reheat in a 350° oven for 10 minutes. The sauce can be refrigerated for up to 2 days

    Recipe #141199

    North African in spirit, this dish is easy enough for weeknight cooking but impressive enough to serve to guests. Note the sauté-and-roast technique used to prepare the chicken, which results in crisp skin and juicy meat. Contrast the strong, sweet, spicy and salty notes in the relish with a fruity, medium-weight Zinfandel. Look for the 1997 Eberle Paso Robles Sauret Vineyard or the 1998 Ridge Sonoma Station.

    Recipe #133824

    If you think cinnamon seems odd with beans, you've underestimated what Turkish cooks can do with spices. Try this healthy and delicious side dish, a Food and Wine staff favorite! MAKE AHEAD: The beans can be refrigerated overnight. Bring to room temperature before serving. Recipe by Engin Akin from Engin's Empire (Food and Wine, April 2001)

    Recipe #140562

    Easy and Delicious! Spicy tomato jam is a popular Moroccan condiment that is wonderful with grilled shrimp. I like my jam with some texture, so I skip the puree part. Serve with couscous. Lemon-herb couscous or apricot couscous are great choices. This dish pairs perfectly with a full, aromatic white, such as a Viognier or Gewurztraminer. Also goes well with, Lageder Pinot Bianco, 2002 - a Northern Italian white wine. Jam simmers for an hour and the shrimp marinate for 30 minutes, so plan accordingly.

    Recipe #172592

    This great tasting fish recipe was created by Nadia Roden and was found in Party By the Pyramids. The dish can be made with fish fillets with skin such as mackerel or cod. MAKE AHEAD: The fish can be cooked up to 4 hours ahead and served at room temperature.

    Recipe #140690

    Connoisseurs who taste this seductive dessert of meringue and chocolate ganache will be reminded of a French dacquoise. Yet in Morocco this unforgettable flourless, butterless cake bears the intriguing name of Le Russe, "the Russian." Look for superfine sugar in the baking section of supermarkets, or simply make it by grinding granulated sugar in a food processor. From The Scent of Orange Blossoms: Sephardic Cuisine from Morocco (Canada, UK), by Kitty Morse and Danielle Mamane.

    Recipe #126972

    This healthy Middle Eastern recipe is from Deborah Knight (Mosaic in Scottsdale, AZ), F&W pick for one of America's Best New Chefs in 2002.

    Recipe #140909

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