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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / No photos!
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    Very tangy, not too sweet! Heaven must taste like this. Got this from the NPR website, with a story about going to pick the apricots at the orchard every summer. http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=12195825 Note: I pack the apricot halves firmly into the measuring cup so they are bursting full when I measure them. If you don't pack them in as firmly, you might want to use a few more apricots. Also, a note about the serving size: this assumes you are using a tablespoon or so as a serving to spread on a piece of bread. In my experience, this recipe makes just less than a pint of jam.

    Recipe #246688

    This is a lovely use for apples! From "The Book of Jewish Food" by Claudia Roden. She suggests serving this with yogurt to balance the sweetness. The rosewater flavor is strong here, so if you are shy about rosewater consider cutting the amount in half. This would be lovely as a filling in a white cake, layered with vanilla pastry cream in between the cake layers.

    Recipe #255301

    The original recipe uses beef chuck, but I adapted it to use veggie crumbles that resemble meat. I used Morningstar Farms "sausage" soy crumbles, but you could use ground beef or cubed chuck, or any similar type of main ingredient. I use the "fire-roasted" type of diced tomatoes to get the smoky flavor in the stew.

    Recipe #255929

    Rich, smooth and thick, perfect for when the weather starts to turn frosty. Make enough to have leftovers the next day -- it is even better when the flavors have time to meld together. From "Fields of Greens" by Annie Somerville.

    Recipe #259847

    In the fall I start looking for as many ways as possible to use pumpkin. This is adapted from "The Book of Jewish Food" by Claudia Roden. All measurements are relative to the amount of pumpkin you choose to use -- you will need a kitchen scale.

    Recipe #262328

    This is a recipe I have not yet tried. but it is from "The Book of Jewish Food" by Claudia Roden, and every single recipe I have made from that book so far has been a winner! This recipe originates in Iraq, and appeared originally in a 13th century Baghdad cookbook.

    Recipe #262449

    I modified this from recipe#106005, because I wanted a lower-sugar cookie. My target was to try to get one cookie = 15g carbs, which is one dietary carb for those who are counting. Cooking (passive) time = cooling time. Chef#163441 deserves the credit for posting an awesome, yummy and easy cookie recipe!

    Recipe #268838

    I had made recipe#256262 for breakfast, and had about 1 1/2 cups of it left over. It was too delicious to throw away, so I put it in the fridge and decided to make bread from it. I think you could also use a lot of other ingredients instead of bulgur -- the point would be to include some combination of whole grains, dried fruits and nuts, then use bread flour rather than all-purpose, so that you can develop enough of the gluten to get a decent rise. The bulgur pudding I started with had been made with milk, honey, dates, dried apricots and spices, so those flavors contributed to my final bread. I then added dried cranberries, rolled oats, and sunflower seeds. Add whatever spices you like, or if you want, try my recipe#261857.

    Recipe #270920

    From Death & Co., a popular bar in New York. Cooking time = chilling time. Note: I don't know what they mean by "Black Market Tea" other than using black tea to infuse the vermouth. That is what I'm doing to make this punch. Their website doesn't clarify this.

    Recipe #273637

    Better than the kind in the tin, homemade soft and delicious coconut macaroons, dipped in chocolate. YUM! (These will be gobbled up before the second seder, so make sure you get one at the first seder while you have a chance!) From Joan Nathan. Note: Zaar won't let me specify matzah cake meal, it only recognizes matzo meal. Be sure to use the cake meal variety.

    Recipe #276031

    Intoxicating orange and coconut flavors, a light and perfect dessert for after a seder. It is pareve. If you want to, add whipped cream to the top. From Joan Nathan.

    Recipe #276034

    I found this recipe on the web somewhere, saved it, and have since forgotten where I found it. No matter -- it is divine! Serve with my Recipe#232706 if you like, or just dig in with a spoon or your fingers. Cooking time = letting the mixture sit for a while, just for the flavors to blend. Mmmmm.

    Recipe #276035

    I watched Rachael Ray make a version of this on tv one morning while I was battling the elliptical machine at the gym. Not fair. But it looked scrumptious, so I found the recipe as soon as I got home, and made a note to try it (in moderation, of course!) as soon as possible. I modified it a bit to suit my taste. Here I share it with you, minus the elliptical torture. Aren't you getting off easy this time?

    Recipe #276036

    Can you say yum? From the King Arthur Flour website. Buy lots of fresh cranberries while they are in season, and freeze to be able to make this year-round! Passive cooking time here = chilling time.

    Recipe #276263

    Small, cheese-filled pastries, eaten as snacks. This recipe comes from the book "A Baker's Odyssey" by Greg Patent. It was recently featured on NPR.

    Recipe #284476

    This recipe comes from a cookbook published by a local B'nai B'rith Women chapter in 1963. I haven't yet tried this recipe, but I plan to this Passover! If you try it first, please let me know what you think.

    Recipe #291565

    This comes from a cookbook published by a local chapter of B'nai B'rith Women in 1963. They offer two fillings, both milk-based and meat-based. You could also use fruit fillings, such as a fruit compote. Note: Zaar doesn't recognize matzah cake meal, only regular matzah meal. The recipe specifies the cake meal.

    Recipe #291639

    This comes from a 1963 cookbook published by a local chapter of B'nai B'rith Women. This is a divine sweet kugel, worthy of making through the year and not just at Passover.

    Recipe #291640

    This recipe comes from a 1972 cookbook by a Jewish women's organization (ORT) that was published as a fundraiser for a vocational training program. It is like a church or synagogue congregation cookbook, only bigger, because recipes were submitted from an 8-state region. (My suggestions are in parentheses.)

    Recipe #292596

    This recipe comes from a 1972 cookbook by a Jewish women's organization (ORT) that was published as a fundraiser for a vocational training program. It is like a church or synagogue congregational cookbook, only bigger, because recipes were submitted from an 8-state region. (I added my own suggestions in parentheses.)

    Recipe #292843

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