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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / N.A.M.E. Tag Cookbook
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    218 recipes in

    N.A.M.E. Tag Cookbook

    North African Middle Eastern recipes!
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    Local specialties in Doha, Qatar include pomegranate slushies and avocado milkshakes. It’s a great way to get the good fats and other awesome nutrients from avocados, coconut milk, and pistachios into your body, using ingredients from the Middle East.

    Recipe #501898

    This syrup is a traditional feature of Middle Eastern sweets and pastries. It’s essentially a sugar syrup that is used to bathe, soak or sprinkle on various sweets. It’s scented with orange blossom water, rose water or both. These distilled essences are widely available in the Middle East, and they are increasingly available in the West. This recipe is from Qatar, which is bordered by Saudi Arabia. The syrup is very easy to make, and the proportions vary depending on desired thickness. Water and sugar are boiled with a little lemon juice to prevent it from crystallizing. The orange blossom water or rose water is stirred in at the end of cooking. Any sooner can weaken their aroma. When the syrup is used for making pastries, it must be added when the pastries are already baked, fried or cooked. Cold syrup is added to hot pastries. It’s either poured onto the pastry or the pastry is dipped for a moment, then lifted out. Recipe from Arabic Zeal.

    Recipe #501895

    A yummy Middle Eastern recipe. A perfectly stuffed Arabian grape leaf is a thing of beauty, and this version can be found throughout the Gulf. After slowly simmering in a bath of olive oil and lemon juice, they are plump, tart and silky rich. Inside is a glory of rice, laced with fresh mint and parsley, and a smattering of tomatoes and green onion. Ask anyone in Qatar – stuffed grape leaves must be made with loving hands, not purchased. So here ya go! Qatar is bordered by Saudia Arabia and the Persian gulf. From Global Table Adventures.

    Recipe #501890

    Oh my goodness! I haven't tried this, but you can bet I will. Putting here for safekeeping. From rawganicvegan.

    Recipe #501828

    This dish blends the flavors of string beans with tomato sauce, cinnamon and walnuts – to delicious results.Its spiciness comes from freshly ground black pepper accenting the cinnamon instead of from some form of red pepper and the turmeric only adds to the warm blanket of flavor surrounding the beans. Serve hot with a roast meat or kebab dish or enjoy it all by itself for a quick lunch. From the first volume of The Silk Road Gourmet. Armenia is a mountainous country in the South Caucasus region of Eurasia. Located at the crossroads of Western Asia and Eastern Europe, it is bordered by Turkey to the west, Georgia to the north, and Azerbaijan to the east, and Iran and Azerbaijan to the south.

    Recipe #501805

    Bahrain, officially the Kingdom of Bahrain, is a small island country situated near the western shores of the Persian Gulf. It is an archipelago of 33 islands, with Saudi Arabia to the west and Iran to the north. Make this dish a day ahead to allow time for the flavors to mingle. Uukkous Al-Badinjan blows baba ganoush out of the water! From Global Table Adventures.

    Recipe #501804

    An authentic Afghanistan tea recipe from bodhileaves blog.

    Recipe #501634

    Yum! From Semi-Homemade Cooking, Episode: Drive-In

    Recipe #501484

    These are like the sandwiches sold by street vendors in Niger, West Africa. Layer hot, scrambled eggs in a crusty, toasty baguette, wrap ‘em up and tie with a bow. Simple, filling and comforting. In Niger they wrap them in newspaper but any paper will do. The people of Niger often add a leafy vegetable called Malahiya – indigenous throughout the region, but here spinach is used. From Sasha Martin.

    Recipe #501248

    A delectable Persian appetizer made of green olives, walnuts, and pomegranate arils. If pomegranate is not available where you are, or if it is out of season, do not fear, a great substitution is dried cranberries. You can play with the amount of ingredients and adjust them to your liking. Try this medley with wedges of lavash flatbread, or scooped onto crackers or as is. From AZ Cookbook.

    Recipe #501203

    Although the dish tastes great with the addition of dry white wine as the original recipe calls for, you can use marsala cooking wine instead but add a little more lemon juice to compensate for the sweetness of marsala and the mushrooms tastes great, too! Adapted from “Casual Cooking” by Michael Chiarello and found posted in Azerbaijan cooking site. I'm liking Azerbaijan more all the time.

    Recipe #501202

    This combination of dusky dates and tinted marzipan is a North African tradition. Worthy of a special occasion. From Cooking Light(May 2001).

    Recipe #501197

    There's character to spare in this layered flatbread, called msemmen in Arabic. The dough is rubbed with spiced oil, rolled into a spiral, flattened, and then cooked on a griddle, for a flakiness that's surprisingly substantial.This recipe from Farid Zadi. Zadi likes pairing the flatbread with an acidic dish,but the bread actually goes well with an entire meal, so plan on leaving it on the table from start to finish.

    Recipe #501200

    In Bahrain(and all over the Middle East), apricots are plentiful, and they are dried to preserve them. Here is a recipe using the dried apricots that is yummy as a snack! On occasion a little lemon juice can be added(about a tsp.) but you may want to add a touch more honey if adding the lemon.

    Recipe #500681

    Qormas are very popular among Afghan people. Onions are fried and meats, fruits, spices or vegetables are added to them. This is a vegetarian version, actually it's vegan! From squidoo.

    Recipe #500680

    Afghanistan's proximity to Iran and India has attracted many travellers and invaders over the centuries. As a result Afghan culture has absorbed many foreign influences including Greek, Persian and Indian.These influences have given Afghans a unique culinary heritage. Whilst Afghan cuisine does include a few vegetarian dishes, there is no doubt that it is predominantly meat based. Happily it lends itself very well to adaptation, as in this rice and lentil dish, with garnishes of carrots, raisins and almonds. Enjoy!

    Recipe #500678

    A delicious smoothie using walnut milk(easy to make-see Recipe#500254). From Aida Mollencamp

    Recipe #500255

    Telba is a healthy and refreshingly creamy beverage. Be careful how much you drink, though. Telba is a mild laxative. From whats4eats.

    Recipe #500050

    In Iran, a pitcher of sekanjabin is served at family picnics, especially during those long, hot months. The syrup is simple: sugar, mint and water. But it’s the vinegar that makes this into a delicious sweet and sour concoction. The mint syrup can be served two ways. The first is as a dipping sauce for fresh, crisp lettuce leaves. There’s something quite novel watching grown adults lick their fingers while dipping their crispy greens into this very sticky syrup. Heads of lettuce are consumed by the bunches as everyone dips on leaf after another. Some prefer sekanjabin as a drink: diluted in water, served over a glass filled with ice and grated cucumber. You can control the amount of sweetness, adding more or less water as desired. Some prefer more tang and add a bit more vinegar or lemon juice.

    Recipe #500001

    A delightful drink, perfect for hot days. A traditional Persian drink tweaked to make it easier. The lemon juice is not traditional, but is very good. Adapted from Fig and Quince, Modern Persian Cooking.

    Recipe #499996

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