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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / My homeland! UK - GB for ZWT6
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    15 recipes in

    My homeland! UK - GB for ZWT6

    All of my authentic British recipes for ZWT6 and the GB/UK leg of the journey.

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    I was taught how to cook fish and chips by my mum when I was about 12 years old; we were living in Hong Kong at the time and it was my mum's way of treating us to a little bit of home as a treat! My mum had this recipe written down on the back of an old envelope stuck inside her Be-Ro cookbook from 1952 - I never use any other method now! One trick is to make sure that everything is prepared and assembled ready for frying takeoff!!! If you are cooking for two or more people, have your oven on with a lined tray to keep the fish and chips warm. If you really want to be totally authentic, cut up squares of greaseproof paper and sheets of newspaper - place the fish and chips onto the greaseproof paper and then into a sheet of newspaper. All you need now is a pickled onion, salt and MALT VINEGAR! TIPS for CHIPS: I notice one reviewer had difficulty with the chips. Here are a few tips or tricks for chips: Make sure they are DRIED thoroughly. Make sure the fat is VERY hot - 190 degrees C. Certain potatoes are better for chipping, such as King Edwards, Desiree, Majestic, Maris Piper, and Romano. You can soak the chips for an hour before the first frying - it extracts excess starch, which helps in the "crisping" process! Always drain them thoroughly before serving. I hope these tips will help!

    Recipe #183399

    When I was last back in England, I bought a bag of semi-dried mixed summer berries; strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, bilberries (wild blueberries) and cherries, all semi-dried and bursting with colour and flavour. I could not wait to cook with them, having sampled a few of them first of course! I came up with this recipe, a simple classic scone recipe, the mainstay of all English tea tables and they simply flew off the table, with requests for the recipe. The stars of the show are the semi-dried berries, and a good home-made jam and cream of course. Use any semi-dried berries you can source locally, but do try to replicate the summer berries I have listed, for that optimum flavour sensation!

    Recipe #428883

    Freshly boiled eggs are encased in a herb flavoured sausage “jacket” and are then deep-fried until golden and crisp, delicious! Contrary to popular belief, Scotch eggs are not Scottish, and they were actually invented by the famous London department store “Fortnum & Mason” in 1738, where they are still available today. The word "Scotch" is an old English word meaning to chop or mince, and obviously, the eggs are covered with “chopped or minced” pork sausage meat, hence the name Scotch Eggs. They are traditional British picnic food but I also like to serve them as a light lunch or snack, and they make a wonderful addition to the buffet table. These tasty traditional English specialities have had bad press over the years; mainly down to commercial mass production, but if you make them at home with fresh, free-range eggs and the best quality sausage meat, they will taste divine, and they will always be the stars of the picnic hamper or family lunch table! PLEASE use high quality sausage meat or sausages, with at least 70% meat content.Historical Note: Founded in 1707, Fortnum & Mason (F&M) stocks "food fit for a queen". The 300-year-old British department store, famous for its jams, teas, and sauces, provides the Queen with her annual supply of Christmas puddings and holds the "Royal Warrant. NB: You can use quail's eggs with great results too - perfect for an elegant appetiser or starter. (The optional mixed spice is for those who like a spicy meat coating, it is mentioned in some old recipes, but I don't always use it.)

    Recipe #408043

    Served warm and oozing with butter, these fabulous fruity griddlecakes make a great treat for breakfast or afternoon tea. I remember my grandmother making these when I was little; she lived in a very old stone cottage in Northumberland, and made these on a huge cast iron black griddle, or girdle as they were also called! We used to eat them hot from the griddle, with butter – in front of a roaring wood fire during the winter months. Singin' hinnies are a type of fried fruit scone or griddle cake, so called as they 'sing' and sizzle whilst cooking. 'Hinny' is a Northern term for endearment used especially to children - my grandmother used to call me "hinny". Similar to singin' hinnies are Northumbrian griddle cakes, also known as Gosforth gridies. If you are making them for a children’s party or at Christmas, put coins that have been briefly boiled, then wrapped in greaseproof paper, in the middle of some of the singin’ hinnies.

    Recipe #388389

    The perfect pot of English tea leads to the perfect cup of English tea! I know this is NOT a recipe, but it is amazing how many people do not know how to make a PROPER POT of tea! We always make a pot of tea at home - even if there is only one of us here, we just use a smaller pot! I also prefer loose tea to tea-bags, but we do use good quality tea-bags as well. This is my method for making a perfect pot of tea, and therefore a perfect cuppa. This has been posted due to a request from my daughter, who obviously has FAR more sophisticated tastes as a university student than I did when I was one!! Plus, what can be nicer then baking a cake, inviting a couple of friends over and having a natter with a cuppa? It puts the world to rights! Quantities are listed for a pot of tea for two.....you can increase or decrease the amounts to suit.The following extract is from Mrs Beeton's book of Household Management printed in 1880; here she suggests the method for a "perfect" cup of tea, using loose tea of course and NOT tea bags! "There is very little art in making good tea; if the water is boiling, and there is no sparing of the fragrant leaf, the beverage will almost invariably be good. The old-fashioned plan of allowing a teaspoonful to each person, and one over, is still practised. Warm the teapot with boiling water; let it remain for two or three minutes for the vessel to become thoroughly hot, then pour it away. Put in the tea, pour in from 1/2 to 3/4 pint of boiling water, close the lid, and let it stand for the tea to draw from 5 to 10 minutes; then fill up the pot with water. The tea will be quite spoiled unless made with water that is actually ‘boiling’, as the leaves will not open, and the flavour not be extracted from them; the beverage will consequently be colourless and tasteless,—in fact, nothing but tepid water. Where there is a very large party to make tea for, it is a good plan to have two teapots instead of putting a large quantity of tea into one pot; the tea, besides, will go farther. When the infusion has been once completed, the addition of fresh tea adds very little to the strength; so, when more is required, have the pot emptied of the old leaves, scalded, and fresh tea made in the usual manner."

    Recipe #263420

    During Victorian times, children used to take watercress sandwiches to school in place of meat ones. I love them, especially when cut into small trianges and served with a cuppa (cup of tea!). Use the freshest bread - I like to use wholemeal, and a fresh salted farmhouse butter. I have included a soup idea at the end of the recipe, to be made with the excess stalks! So a soup and sandwich recipe then!

    Recipe #412074

    Luscious fresh strawberries nestle amongst light sponge cake sandwiched with strawberry jam, which are then covered with creamy custard and topped with clotted cream. Simple! This trifle may be simple but it is the star on any tea-time or dessert table and if you cannot obtain clotted cream, use whipping cream, heavy cream or double cream instead. Madeira is used in place of sherry in this trifle, which gives a mellow flavour to the trifle. This is a recipe that my mum sent to me, from a cutting in a British magazine promoting Devon and Cornwall in the West Country - home of the Cream Tea! If you wish to serve this to children or non-drinkers, substitute the Madeira with fruit juice of your choice. In the summer scatter some pink rose petals over the top for the ultimate and romantic finish! (Prep time includes the chilling and soaking time.)

    Recipe #412075

    Yorkshire Tea is a black tea blend produced by Taylors of Harrogate, one of the few remaining family tea and coffee merchants in the UK. The company was founded in 1886 by Yorkshire tea merchant Charles Taylor. Needless to say I drink Yorkshire tea at home in France, I bring boxes and boxes of it back from the UK when I travel there! The Yorkshire Tea Loaf was produced by Taylors as a way of using their Yorkshire tea to expand their range. It involves using the choicest fruits which are infused overnight with the tea. This is my take on their famous tea loaf; moist tea infused fruits really make this loaf something special and it is sublime when served with a traditional English cuppa. Serve this tea loaf in thick slices just as it is - although you could also serve it with butter or with a slab of Wensleydale cheese for that authentic Yorkshire experience. (This is an adapted version of the recipe that is posted on the Yorkshire tea website.)

    Recipe #414946

    Juicy British bangers (sausages) with baked beans, fresh eggs, fried bread fingers and tomatoes. Yup! It's bold and brash, but a great brunch idea for those days when half a grapefruit and some cereal just doesn't tick the boxes! I cook this on a griddle - it is easier to fit all the food on at the same time, and if you spray the griddle with oil, it is healthier too. Yes, you can add bacon or potatoes or even mushrooms, but we like this simple combination of bangers, beans, egg and tomatoes with fingers of crispy fried bread. Quantities listed are suggestions for two greedy people; please do adjust the amounts to suit your personal requirements. This sets you up for the day, especially if served with freshly squeezed orange juice and a pot of tea. We are normally too full to have toast, but toast and marmalade would be a great accompaniment if you have room!

    Recipe #415695

    This is probably one of the lightest and most mouth-watering puddings ever invented. This delightful old fashioned British "Pud" consists of layers of baked custard, raspberry jam and is finished with clouds of light, fluffy meringue - truly a Queen in the pudding world. It is a quintessential Nursery dessert, something that Nanny would rustle up for her young charges in the nursery. My mum would often make this for Sunday high tea, and we all loved it. I often use brioche crumbs for a richer custard base, but any white bread crumbs will be fine. There are numerous recipes for this classic dessert; this recipe is by James Martin, one of my favourite British chefs.

    Recipe #421542

    I cannot believe there is no "recipe" for marmite on toast here! Okay, maybe calling it a recipe is stretching it a bit far, but it is a British breakfast classic, and if you LOVE marmite, you will love marmite on hot buttered toast! Use a nice nutty, granary bread and a cheeky little butter for the prefect Marmite in Toast extravaganza! Make a perfect pot of tea, Recipe #263420, for the perfect accompaniment and away you go, you’ll be saying "Cor blimey Guv'ner" in no time!

    Recipe #422206

    The delicious golden-crusted traditional Hollygog pudding originates from Oxfordshire in England and is a pudding delight. Oxfordshire is a varied county, with a rural character that contrasts with the sophistication of its principal town, and this is a typical simple, robust Oxfordshire farm pudding. On National Pudding Day, the Breakfast crew of BBC Radio Oxfordshire, set the Old Farmhouse Bakery in Steventon a challenge, to make an old Hollygog Pudding based on an Oxford recipe. Kate Bitmead and the team at the bakery rose to the challenge and before the end of the show had produced the delicious golden-crusted traditional Hollygog pudding. Kate’s tip is to drizzle generous spoonfuls of the custard-like sauce that comes out of the pudding during cooking on top and enjoy! Here is the delicious result, with courtesy of BBC radio Oxford and The Old farmhouse bakery team. I posted this recipe after seeing it on a foodie blog recently; I have had this recipe saved for some time now with a view to making it, as well as sharing it! Enjoy!

    Recipe #422774

    My grandma's recipe, an easy and tasty way mid-week meal made with corned beef, potatoes and onions - simple and packed with flavour. Panackelty is a corruption of the word Pan Haggerty; Panackelty is a baked dish consisting of meat, usually corned beef, bacon or lamb chops, and root vegetables (mainly potatoes and onions) which is left to bake throughout the day in a pot on low heat. Originating in the Sunderland area of North East England, the dish was a favourite of working-class families and was traditionally eaten on Monday as the leftover meat and vegetables from the previous day’s meal could be used. A local version of the popular dish of Shepherd's Pie or Cottage Pie. I have a vegetarian recipe for this recipe, Recipe #423399. Historical Note: The families of miners and shipyard workers would often prepare this meal as it could be slow cooked by a housewife during the day while she continued with other household tasks. A hungry worker coming home would also be especially satisfied with the high in fat and carbohydrate content of the dish. There are endless interpretations of the dish, with different families using different ingredients. Other popular panackelty concoctions will include bacon, sausages, black pudding, beef stock, and occasionally pork or lamb chops and additional vegetables such as carrots. The vegetarian version is called Pan Haggerty, and it is thought that the meat version is a corruption of that word.

    Recipe #423393

    Delicious cheesy scones with crispy bacon, a real treat for breakfast or high tea. These traditional scones are wonderful when served with fried or scrambled eggs for breakfast, alongside grilled tomatoes or mushrooms maybe. This is a recipe from an old W. I. (Woman's Insitute) cookbook and originates from the city of Birmingham, in the Midlands, England. Traditional comforting and British fare on a plate! Note: Brummie is the British slang term for people who come from Birmingham.

    Recipe #421082

    I grew up with this, as well as the meat version which is called Panackelty, (Recipe #423393). It is a cheap and cheerful supper dish, that would satisfy the hungriest of workers and families. Layers of potatoes are fried with onions and cheese for a delectable supper dish, and one of my all time favourites. Historical note: This is a traditional Northumberland supper dish which is said to have taken its name from the French 'Hachis', meaning to chop or slice. Traditionally Pan Haggerty is always served directly from the pan in which it is cooked.

    Recipe #423399


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