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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / MOROCCO
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    34 recipes in

    MOROCCO

    I recently visited Morocco and the food there was fabulous. So tasty, so eye appealing and the smells are out of this world. I had to start my collection right here. I hope you enjoy and thanks to all on Zaar, especially Hajar, who have shared these recipes.
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    This is one of my favorite lentil soups outside of one I had in Rome many years ago now. There are thousands of "Moroccan" Lentil Soup recipes out there; especially on the internet where everyone is a "Moroccan Cook" simply by using the spices used in Morocco. That is not what Moroccan cooking is about. Yes, it is the spicing but how much? How many? Which types? Just as anyone can add garlic and basil to a dish and call it Italian food, is it? I think, in fact, I know not. That it may have ingredients well known to and used in many regions of Italy does not make it authentic. I will settle for nothing less than real life authenticity when it comes to Moroccan food; or the food of any country/region. It is in the knowledge, technique, time and simplicity where one finds authenticity; not necessarily in Gourmet Magazine or from Aunt Rita who went to Morocco, or anywhere, once 45 years ago on a five day tour blitz. This one is simple and hearty.

    Recipe #140633

    This easy grilled chicken is combined with a colorful tomatoes, peppers and olives, and drizzled with a spicy cumin, paprika and ground red pepper dressing. Best served on a bed of fluffy couscous to soak up all the fabulous flavors.

    Recipe #45355

    Grilled with a nice charred flavor and exotic spice, these go great with a salad and a side of couscous. You can also cook these under the broiler as well as the grill.

    Recipe #71484

    267 Reviews |  By Mirj

    A very healthy and exotic way to prepare chicken. Goes great with couscous and a fresh green salad.

    Recipe #15580

    This dish IS a tagine, though these days most Moroccan home cooks do not use a Tagine any longer due to the cost of gas for cooking. Pressure cooking is the preferred method of making a tagine today. You will find tagine cooking in a Tagine now in the very rural areas where there is no stove present and/or for tourist show. Tagine simply means to stew and this can be done in a dutch oven, large heavy pot, or pressure cooker. We serve this on a communal platter with bread, salad and olives when we are in an olive mood. This is a dish made by my husband quite often when I can't or don't feel like cooking. I have made it as well and it is a great winter warmer! P.S. We serve every meal with Hajar's wicked sauce tomatish which freezes well. c.2005

    Recipe #135163

    THE ubiquitous sauce of Morocco! Whether a version such as this one or simply thinned down tomato concentrate/paste it is everywhere. Made at home 2-5 times a week and more like 3-6 times at my home! We adore this sauce which is actually meant for dipping your bread into and then scooping up a piece of meat or veg. from the communal platter. It is also served with homemade french fries,poured into hot sandwiches and mixed into spaghetti/macaroni,rice. c.2005

    Recipe #130945

    This is a flat bread that we use for meals, sandwiches and breakfast. It is our daily bread here in Morocco and is rarely made at home unless rurally as it is so inexpensive and available on every street corner; small or large. This bread is good for soaking up the sauces,broths and for pushing the food onto and sort of dragging from the communal platter to eat. This bread is our knife and fork! This recipe makes 2 loaves and is easily cut in half for one loaf c.2005

    Recipe #137111

    This is a wonderful Moroccan salad for summer and especially in winter when you crave that salad crunch and the salad vegetables are all puny and pale! Keeps well and is also great for picnics. We prefer it served cold here, especially with hot winter warmers. Use salt should you think it needs it and to your liking. I use a very small pinch as I do not want to draw all of the water out of the carrots but I do want a bit of the juice. c.2005

    Recipe #134482

    THIS is the recipe that shocked me!! In any normal flipping through a magazine or cookbook, I would have passed the recipe by without a second thought. BUT, I LOVED IT!!! Serve this with the Spicy Tomato Sauce that is also in this cookbook. Just a wonderful appetizer. A bit lengthy....yet worth the oooohhs and aaahhhhs!!! **NOTE: Rolls can be assembled (but not coated or cut) 1 day ahead and chilled, covered. They can also be assembled and cut (but not coated or baked) 2 weeks ahead and frozen, wrapped well in plastic wrap. Cut frozen rolls, then bake (do not thaw) in a preheated 350ºF oven for about 20 min.

    Recipe #182157

    A tagine is a Moroccan clay pot used for long slow cooking or braising of succulent stews most often served with couscous. This is an Americanized version of a typical dish that one can easily prepare at home. I love the sweet and spicy contrast found in many dishes from this region and often add a bit of harissa.

    Recipe #141373

    This recipe originally won first prize ($1 Million) in a national cook-off of some sort (I think Pillsbury) several years ago. I can see why - it is a wonderful combination of flavours. The recipe is quite easy to make and is very economical. I have also substituted the chicken thighs for boneless, skinless breasts and it works just fine. The thighs are definitely better though as they are more moist. Do try this - you'll love it.

    Recipe #50575

    My sister brought this recipe home from her middle school Spanish class for the Day of the Dead - fudge with the traditional Mexican twist of added cinnamon. I did not include cooling in the cooking time.

    Recipe #139937

    7 Reviews |  By KelBel

    This is the perfect way to end a meal on a cold wintry day, and the leftovers are great the following day! Serve warm with vanilla ice cream.

    Recipe #166491

    3 Reviews |  By Mirj

    My daughter Tehila has a wonderful friend, Adva, who is of Moroccan descent. Her mother makes these treats for the family on holidays, and shares them with our family. The last time we made these together, and had lots of fun doing it. Prep time includes time for the dough to rise.

    Recipe #28175

    A Brilliant and easy accompaniment to a Fragrant Tagine, Stew or Curry. It's a cheat's recipe as you can pre-mix all the dry ingredients together & store in a jar ready for use at the drop of a hat. Just add hot water or hot stock and voila, a wonderful fruity, spiced couscous! It can be used cold for picnic & buffet salads - cold cuts of meat, such as diced cooked chicken breast can be added too. Also a great veggie main course - just add chargrilled vegetables and mix through - serve with flatbreads, pitta bread & harissa dressing for an extra kick!

    Recipe #176181

    Tender chunks of beef simmered in a fragrant & fruity broth enriched with honey - a traditional Moroccan tagine at it's best! I cook mine in a traditional tagine & an electric tagine; but I realise that not everyone has one, so I have also tested this out in my crock pot; it works REALLY well and is better when cooking larger quantities. The meat becomes meltingly tender and the fruity & spicy smell transports you immediately to Morocco........on a magic carpet maybe?? Yes, I am waxing lyrical I know - but this tagine is a real winner. It's not particularly seasonal, but I do think that the colder autumn & winter months are a good time to indulge in this North African comfort dish!

    Recipe #191946

    13 Reviews |  By Rita~

    Iv'e been craving this since going to DC to meet others from zaar.We went to a place called the taste of Morocco. I found this recipe on line. Serve chicken, covered with sauce, over Couscous or Rice. Have Green Tea with Mint with or after the meal. This Tagine -- the word, also spelled Tajine, refers both to the cooking pot as well as a stew cooked in it -- is one of dozens of classic tagines prepared in Northern Africa, especially Morocco. The tagine consists of two parts: a round pot (traditionally clay), and a conical cover with a small hole which allows some steam to escape. A large dutch oven or something similar can also be used. Check out "the right place for Tagines": www.tagines.com.http://www.congocookbook.com/c0096.html

    Recipe #77530

    6 Reviews |  By Rita~

    For those Moroccan dishes. Optional Safi Mixture: 1 cinnamon stick 3 cloves 5 to 6 coriander seeds 3 to 4 black peppercorns 1 bay leaf can be added in between layers of lemons.The addition of olive oil to act as a sealant on top of the lemons but is not necessary.

    Recipe #77521

    I am fortunate to work at a place where the manager of the cafeteria is a Moroccan native. Our mutual love of food has resulted in endless exchange of recipes, spices and samplings. (Indeed, some of the items now served in the cafeteria are recipes from this site.) One one occasion, I was lucky enough to be able to share in the lunch he prepared for the staff. I love eggs and his were just amazing. This recipe from World Vegetarian seems like a close approximate - though I know his version included a generous bit of cumin and cilantro. I'm posting the original here and will begin to tinker. Once perfected, I'll post that version as a second recipe. Will experiment to see if this works as well with canned tomatoes.

    Recipe #140936

    Literally this translates into coconut sugar. I have added the word fudge here as these are most commonly called "cakes." Also, for ease I have used evaporated milk in the recipe though mass marketing of evaporated milk here is relatively new. Most home cooks evaporate their own milk, IF they can afford milk. This is a lovely very sweet ending to a rich meal served with strong black coffee and how we most often serve it here. This sort of recipe is made only by those who have money and certainly isn't the average person's fare who is more concerned with finding bread. Morocco is devistatingly poor with 95% of the wealth belonging to just under 5% of the people. Moroccans say it is a true blessing to be able to eat so extravagantly as to have these coconut cakes. This is quick to make and if you love coconut, this is for you! Cut into very small squares though; Moroccans adore things extremely sweet. Enjoy! c.\2005

    Recipe #147306

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