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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / Moroccan
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    8 recipes in

    Moroccan


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    I was taught how to make this recipe during a vacation in Morocco, where I was lucky enough to spend some time with the chef of a restaurant, Naima. In Morocco, people eat it straight out of the tagine with lots of bread to soak up the sauce but it also makes the best spaghetti and meatballs I've ever tasted! The key is to use the freshest, juciest tomatoes you can find. If you aren't lucky enough to have a tagine, you should be able to make this dish in a deep frying pan, as long as it has a cover. I think a non-stick pan would be best. One other thing, be careful of adding onions to this dish as they are very watery and will make the sauce runny. If you do add onions, you will probably have to let it simmer uncovered for a few minutes to reduce the sauce.

    Recipe #87354

    This recipe originally won first prize ($1 Million) in a national cook-off of some sort (I think Pillsbury) several years ago. I can see why - it is a wonderful combination of flavours. The recipe is quite easy to make and is very economical. I have also substituted the chicken thighs for boneless, skinless breasts and it works just fine. The thighs are definitely better though as they are more moist. Do try this - you'll love it.

    Recipe #50575

    Tender chunks of beef simmered in a fragrant & fruity broth enriched with honey - a traditional Moroccan tagine at it's best! I cook mine in a traditional tagine & an electric tagine; but I realise that not everyone has one, so I have also tested this out in my crock pot; it works REALLY well and is better when cooking larger quantities. The meat becomes meltingly tender and the fruity & spicy smell transports you immediately to Morocco........on a magic carpet maybe?? Yes, I am waxing lyrical I know - but this tagine is a real winner. It's not particularly seasonal, but I do think that the colder autumn & winter months are a good time to indulge in this North African comfort dish!

    Recipe #191946

    These are very inexpensive and generally sold as street food to be eaten on the street as an egg and potato sandwich stuffed into flatbread with a thin sauce tomatish or purchased and brought home. I have spoken to a couple of my favorite vendors and have come up with this authentic recipe. I adore the egg and potato sandwiches and also love these cakes simply dipped into sauce tomatish and eaten as is. This is poor man's food and sells for 5-10DH ($.70) a sandwich depending on how many eggs and potatoes you want in your sandwich. One of my favorites comes from a man with a table, frying pan, 5 litre jug of oil, a single gas burner, flats of eggs, stacks of bread and rows of potato cakes with bottles of sauce tomatish which his wife makes for him at home each morning to sell. Many of these vendors appear only late at night when all other places to eat have closed. Don't be tempted to use eggs to bind these or they will cease to be Moroccan potato cakes. Easy and yummy comfort food! These are also often eaten at room temperature and/or a bit cold though not from the fridge cold. c.2005

    Recipe #147288

    This is one of my family's favourite recipes; I am constantly asked all the time to make it. I was taught it by a Moroccan friend who also lives in France - it is an old family recipe passed down for many years. It is great all year around - served with flat breads or pitta breads & assorted salads in spring & summer or served with hot fluffy & fruity couscous, assorted chutneys or pickles in the depths of winter. I make mine in a fantastic "Electric Tagine" made by Tefal; it of course works in a more traditional clay tagine - BUT the real secret is.......it works like a dream in a Slow cooker/Crock Pot. Try it out! If you cannot get Ras-el-Hanout, which is an exotic Moroccan spice mixture, including rose petals - don't worry, use the other spices I have listed instead; or I have a Ras-el-Hanout recipe posted on Recipezaar: Recipe #205185 N.B. I notice in a review that it has been suggested that Chemical Heat is needed!! The great thing about sharing recipes is that they can be adapted to personal taste. BUT, this is not supposed to be a "Hot" recipe, but a "Fragrant & Fruity" recipe!! A Tagine by definition is SLOW cooked over a LOW heat & is very fruity with subtle undertones of heat! However, life would be boring if you couldn't add a bit of "heat", but it's just not traditional. What is traditional, is to allow your guests to add their own heat, so have a bowl of "Harissa" on the table. Preserved lemons are also a wonderful and traditional addition - I have a recipe posted on Recipezaar: Recipe #209590 PLEASE NOTE: This recipe lists canned chickpeas in the ingredients, NOT dried! If you use dried chickpeas, you MUST soak them and cook them first!

    Recipe #137530

    Recipe #24336

    8 Reviews |  By Mirj

    Submitted in response to a recipe request by Friedel.

    Recipe #40736

    THE ubiquitous sauce of Morocco! Whether a version such as this one or simply thinned down tomato concentrate/paste it is everywhere. Made at home 2-5 times a week and more like 3-6 times at my home! We adore this sauce which is actually meant for dipping your bread into and then scooping up a piece of meat or veg. from the communal platter. It is also served with homemade french fries,poured into hot sandwiches and mixed into spaghetti/macaroni,rice. c.2005

    Recipe #130945


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