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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / Let's Talk Turkish
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    18 recipes in

    Let's Talk Turkish


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    Sweet Butternut Squash Dip from the Thrace region of Turkey. Found on turkishcookbook.com. I prepared two versions: one with the pomegranate molasses (my addition) and one without.

    Recipe #509263

    From turkishcookbook.com. Gaziantep is in the Southeast Anatolia region of Turkey.

    Recipe #508778

    From turkishcookbook.com. A salad from Istanbul. Note: because fresh cherries are out of season (shame, because Rainier cherries from Washington state would be amazing in this recipe!) I replaced them with sweet dried cherries. You also have the option of substituting other seasonal fruit: peaches, pears, etc. in either fresh or dried form. Turkish feta subbed for the tulum cheese (the latter which I've yet to find here locally).

    Recipe #508779

    From turkishcookbook.com. It is imperative to have the best and freshest ingredients for this dish. The recipe has been prepared twice now: first time with dried egg noodles from the local Mennonite community and second time using the noodle recipe posted below. Also, the noodles were made using a KitchenAid stand up mixer although I had to roll out the dough by hand (don't own a KA pasta attachment-yet). Pine nuts can replace walnuts if you prefer.

    Recipe #421080

    Spruced up from turkishcookbook.com. I hardboil eggs the same manner as the woman who posted this recipe on her site: "I love eggs cooked 'between soft boiled and hard boiled' so I only leave the eggs in the hot water for 4 minutes." I couldn't determine by looking at the photo posted on her site if she used Italian/flat leaf parsley or curly parsley for that reason I'll let you choose. If using sumac, omit the salt. A few Turkish olives garnished over the salad doesn't sound like a bad idea either.

    Recipe #473314

    From my one stop Turkish recipe site: turkingcookbook.com. I replaced half of the white cannellini beans with kidney beans for added color.

    Recipe #386321

    Courtesy of turkishcookbook.com with only a couple adjustments. I don't usually boil spinach (truthfully?: never) but boiled spinach can be beautiful...

    Recipe #414676

    From turkishcooking.com. The website indicates this sauce is used for a condiment on shish kebabs but I served it as a salsa with slices of toasted French bread. Be sure the tomatoes you use are top quality! If you cannot find good quality tomatoes, go ahead and used diced canned. Try different chili peppers such as Thai, habanero, etc. DO NOT omit the sumac as it is integral to the recipe. ;)

    Recipe #236835

    I don't know how closely this resembles the hummus served in Turkey, but it is delicious! Printed in our local newspaper.

    Recipe #184901

    Turkish Red Cabbage Salad with Yogurt Sauce. From turkishcookbook.com

    Recipe #473560

    A Turkish version of Mexican guacamole. From turkishcookbook.com.

    Recipe #444437

    From turkishcookbook.com. I opted to broil the onions instead of baking at four hundred degrees in the original recipe. We enjoyed the onions served over baby arugula/rocket/rockette-an intense combination of flavors!

    Recipe #436628

    From turkishcookbook.com. This delicious soup was very quick and easy to make! As part of my ongoing journey to learn Turkish cuisine...the very most a working knowledge.

    Recipe #428484

    From www.gourmet.gr. I played around a bit with this one. Use regular couscous if you cannot find Israeli couscous. Use a good quality olive oil.

    Recipe #149610

    This "bright" and refreshing salad, from turkikshcookbook.com has all my favorite ingredients. We like to use Recipe #100777 to scoop up the salad, although lavosh would work, too! Named after a mountain in southeast Anatolia. Sumac is available in Middle Eastern shops or online. It will make a huge difference if you use the freshest, best tomatoes and freshest parsley you can find.

    Recipe #184037

    From turkishcookbook.com. Note: a word or two about grape molasses: Grape molasses, or uzum pekmezi (it goes by several names) is concentrated grape juice from the Mediterranean/Middle East. You can read more about it here: slowfoodbeirut.org/index_inv.php?c=inv18

    Recipe #380553

    From turkishcookbook.com. I think if I ever visited Turkey I would quickly become fat and happy. Tulum cheese is the traditional cheese in this intensely flavored salad. It is described as "tangy" in taste. Unfortunately tulum is impossible to find here (I'll have to call around town and see if I can locate it). Meantime, in its place I substituted a good quality chevre and the second test run-freshly grated myzithra. If anyone has a better cheese suggestion for the salad, please *let me know*! Don't say Velveeta. The arugula may suddenly wither and die on the spot. The fresh basil and dried pomegranate seeds are my addition.

    Recipe #421087

    A very simple tomato-based rice side dish recipe from Turkey. From turkishcookbook.com. A flavorful, freshly picked from the garden, preferably organic tomato works best for this recipe. *Update* 17 June 2011: Last week I prepared this substituting quinoa for the rice. Rinse the quinoa first as directed in Step #1 and proceed with recipe as written. The quinoa was completely cooked and liquid evaporated in about 25 minutes.

    Recipe #427221


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