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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / Jewish/Kosher
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    15 recipes in

    Jewish/Kosher


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    Turkish stewed leeks. It is fine if you need to cut up the leeks to fit them in your pan.

    Recipe #184429

    Great for brunch. Comfort food. Easy.

    Recipe #319623

    Popular in Jewish communities throughout the Mediterranean and Middle East, these beautifully marbled rich maroon or brown eggs get their soft texture from the slow cooking process. The addition of onion skins to the liquid are absorbed by the porous shells, which cause the coloration. Huevos Haminados are traditionally served at the Passover Seders of Calcutta, Turkey, Greece, Morocco and Tunisia and others, with slight regional variations. They can also be slowly cooked overnight in a crockpot for Shabbat. The name reflects the eggs' origin in Medieval Spain.

    Recipe #317802

    This recipe is loosely based on a recipe which I found online at alaboostablogspot.com. It is great. I have changed it a bit to make it easier. I make this in a glazed clay pot but a heavy dutch oven will do. A balaboosta is yiddish for an "excellent homemaker..and more"-there is no exact translation. This recipe serves 2-4 people only. Double or triple for more. Flanken is very similar to shortribs ( its cross cut).

    Recipe #432199

    This noodle kugel is what my mom makes every Shabbos. It's amazing and fairly easy to make. Note: It is best to make the night before and put in the refrigerator. The next day slice with a knife, then reheat in the oven.

    Recipe #288559

    This recipe comes from my grandmother's recipe box. She collected recipes from all over the world and this one comes from East Galicia, now a part of Western Ukraine.

    Recipe #289208

    3 Reviews |  By Elmotoo

    This is a great variation on a Eastern European Jewish Dessert or side dish.

    Recipe #135083

    6 Reviews |  By Elmotoo

    A kosher dessert for the Zaar World Tour '05.

    Recipe #134855

    3 Reviews |  By Elmotoo

    This Sephardic recipe looks fabulous so I am submitting it for the Zaar World Tour.

    Recipe #134681

    A Jewish Kosher recipe posted for Around the World Recipe Swap. Recipe from my copy of The Art of Jewish Cooking by Jennie Grossinger.

    Recipe #135716

    5 Reviews |  By Saturn

    Found on net. This sounds divine and it is so very easy.

    Recipe #134959

    My mother in law made this for her family for many years. My husband just loves it when she served it warm. A little cream over it when it is warm sounds good to me. (There is no vanilla or cake mix in this recipe, if you wonder if I forget it.)

    Recipe #121146

    Religious Jewish people are not permitted to cook on the Sabbath. However, dishes prepared in advance may be kept hot in a previously lit oven. In Central Europe, one of the favourite Sabbath dishes was Cholent (primarily a bean dish) because its flavour was not impaired by long, slow cooking; if anything, it was improved. The good houswives would prepare their Cholent on Friday afternoon and place it in the local baker's ovens; the fires were banked, but the ovens retained their intense heat over the Sabbath. It would cook slowly overnight and after schul (synogogue) services were finished, it would be a delicious hot dish for a hungry family. Cholent may be served as a main course or as a side dish, particularly with roast meats. Its consistency when done is quite thick, without liquid, but not quite dry. In a general sort of way, it might be said to resemble old fashioned Boston Baked Beans, although it isn't quite so sweet. This Cholent recipe includes meat, a modern refinement of a dish once composed exclusively of beans, simply because many Jewish families could not afford the meat. This Cholent recipe comes to you from The Art of Jewish Cooking by Jennie Grossinger.

    Recipe #135717

    Corn latkes? Yes, corn latkes. Why should the humble tuber have all the fun? These are tasty variation on a Hanukkah favorite. So good, you shouldn’t wait ‘til then to make some. Depending on your mood you can serve them sweet or savory.

    Recipe #135115

    A tasty chicken latke recipe, flavoured with dill and served with a tzazikki sauce and your favourite salad. This is a great brunch, lunch or mid-week dinner dish. And because the potato and chicken are cooked together, a light salad not only complements the crispness of the latkes, but is an ample accompaniment. Adapted from a recipe on a 'Pan and Wok' recipe card, from International Masters Publishers.

    Recipe #123081


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