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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / Japanese
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    3 recipes in

    Japanese


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    We have a Japanese girl, Tomoko, living with us, and tonight she and I cooked a Japanese dinner for us and her friends. She phoned her mum,Toshiko, in Japan for this, as it's her favourite recipe, and I wanted to share it here. It's simple and so good, and Tomoko, who is only 16, did such a good job of cooking this, then translating the recipe to English for me. *The liquid will thicken to a glaze if you are patient. It just takes a bit of time. If you feel your chicken is cooked (and going to overcook) remove it before going on to reduce the liquid. Same thing, if you must use breast meat, remove it (so it doesn't dry out) and continue reducing the liquid . If you do it this way rather than thickening with cornstarch you will get a richer glaze and not need to add stock or broth instead of the water. It just takes patience. AND NOTE: A glaze is sticky and coats the meat, this is NOT a sauce.

    Recipe #68955

    This is a dish that is popular in Japan and usually sold as street food. This version is made with pork, although you could easily substitute chicken or tofu.

    Recipe #82262

    23 Reviews |  By Nose

    I never could cook short-grain East Asian-style rice until I learned this method from Japanese cookbooks. I knew what I was after: the rice should stick together enough that mouthfuls can easily be picked up with chopsticks, but not be at all sticky or gummy. Each grain should be white and smooth, almost pearl-like, and should taste subtly not just of starch but of delicious grain. For a long time, my short-grain rice was not only not perfect, it often turned out gummy or scorched. I had been able to cook any kind of long-grain rice quite well for years; with that I seem to pick up on some cues I can't quite put into words, maybe just the timing, or some change in the smell. This knack didn't translate to short-grain rice, and I continued to struggle until I read some Japanese cookbooks. As soon as I tried this method, I was able to produce nearly perfect short-grain white rice right away. The cues for how to cook the short-grain rice are in the sounds it makes while cooking. A Japanese nursery rhyme explains: Hajime choro choro (At first it bubbles) Naka pa ppa (And then it hisses) Akago naite mo (Even if the baby is crying (from hunger)) Futa toru na (Don't remove the lid)

    Recipe #108409


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