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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / Japanese
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    I normally make this using whole refrigerated bamboo shoot that I can purchase in Japanese market nearby in California. If whole bamboo shoot is used, cut lengthwise into about 1/4 in slices first. Then cut into 1/4 inch slices. Finally cut the 1/4 inch slices into half. The slices do not need to be perfect - they will taste great when finished. You can also use canned bamboo as well (although taste will be not as good as the fresh version). Menma is granddaddy of one of ramen toppings. In old days if you ordered ramen in Tokyo this was always one of the toppings along with shoyu or soy sauce flavored soup. You can purchase this in a bottle commercially but the cost is quite high for a small bottle. I like to sometimes serve this as a snack for beer, white wine or sake. If served as snack, it is very good with sprinkling of roasted sesame seeds on top.

    Recipe #410541

    From "Ofukuro no Aji" cookbook.

    Recipe #359711

    In the past most chicken karaage (Japanese style fried chicken) recipes were marinated chicken pieces which were deep fried and simply served. Now in Japan, fried chicken karaage recipes often come with different sauces or relishes. One of my favorite is onion sauce, but this one is equally good. If difficult to get leg sections, boneless thighs work very well too. Make several small cuts (not skin side) to flatten the thighs so they lay flatter.

    Recipe #205621

    In Japan, tempura over rice is simply called tendon. It's a shortened word for tempura donburi. You can certainly use any veggies, herbs, fish, seafood for the topping. Normally, large shrimp along with several varieties of vegetables are made into tempura. I like using shiso leaves. Shiso is sometimes called perilla in English and is often used in sushi restaurants - looks like big leaves somewhat similar to large basil leaves but with more texture. I love the taste of shiso and although some people compare shiso leaves to mint, I don't find them similar. Some of the vegetables you can use for tempura include (but not limited to) Japanese eggplant, sweet green Japanese pepper called shishito, kabocha pumpkin, onion, carrots, zucchini, shiso leaves, mushrooms, shitake mushrooms, sweet potato, potato, green beans, and leafy veggie, etc. I am revising this recipe to change the batter ingredients to US measurement for easier preparation. .

    Recipe #305012

    This is the second recipe for the Japanese style barbecue. The first one posted was pork. In Japan, barbecue is popular. It is however different from the American style barbecue. Beef, pork, chicken are usually thinly sliced for quick grilling and are grilled indoors. The diners sit around the table with the grill in the middle and pieces are quickly grilled and eaten at the table a few pieces at a time. This type of barbecue is called yakiniku which translates to grilled meat. People outside of Japan are sometimes familiar with yakitori, a skewered chicken pieces, usually marinated and grilled. But, yakiniku is equally popular in Japan. Yaki means grilled and niku means meat. Yaki means grilled and tori means poultry. You can use he whole apple instead of half and you can certainly sub the apple with pear or nashi (pear apple). Although you can most likely use the juice only in a pinch, you want the pulp from the fruit to adhere to the meat while grilling.

    Recipe #305016

    This style of pasta is very popular in Japan. You can find packaged ume/shiso flavorings for pasta, but nothing beats the homemade version. The first part of this recipe consists of making sweetened ume paste called ume bishio. It is something most Japanese don't even know how to make anymore and it is a shame. It is super versatile and can be used for many recipes. It keeps forever in refrigerator too. For this recipe, you only need to use 3 T of ume bishio and you can keep the rest in the refrigerator for later use. This sauce will only barely coat the spaghetti and is not meant as a thick sauce such as marinara and more like Japanese style pesto sauce.

    Recipe #323048

    I lived for a while in Yokohama when I was in my early teens. Yokohama, Japan is a major harbor in Tokyo area and is known for many Chinese restaurants and various immigrants, especially Chinese. So, it is no wonder shumai became very popular in Yokohama and Yokohama style shumai became famous thoughout Japan. I've had my share of shumai since leaving Yokohama and I am generally not happy with most of the offerings outside of Japan. The problem is the texture. Most shumai filling is too hard - like biting into small hamburger - you can literally bounce filling off the wall hard after steamed. You can use round gyoza wrappers, pot sticker wrappers or square wonton wrappers. I prefer gyoza wrappers because Japanese style wrappers are generally thinner, but if you cannot find it, please use either pot sticker or wonton wrappers. You will need about 35- 40 wrappers. There may be leftover - more below. If you do not have bay or sea scallops, use all shrimp along with ground pork. I like the taste and texture when it has some bay or sea scallops though. What I do with the leftover filling is form into small hamburgers and saute with a bit of oil. For each wrapper , use about 2 tsp filling. Please see various photos of before and after.

    Recipe #332192

    This is a concentrated broth often used in Japan for noodle type dishes, such as in udon, soba, etc. Many recipes can jumpstart from this basic tsuyu, such as oden, salad dressing, other types of sauces by incorporating vinegar, more sugar, ginger, garlic, miso, etc. You can buy type of tsuyu in Japan easily and nowadays most people buy bottled versions which are excellent depending on the brands. I really like Yamasa Kombu Tsuyu. But, the commercially available ones are expensive and may not be readily available outside of Japan. Normally the commercial brands fall into those which can be used straight ie no mixing with additional water or concentrated like this recipe. BTW, the (men) part means noodle in Japan, so mentsuyu means noodle broth and mendare means noodle sauce. But, this type of broth is the basis for many, many Japanese cooking and I hope you can make this and keep it bottled in the refrigerator. Once made, it is easily kept in the fridge for at least one year. This stock should go through several changes of cheesecloth to make sure it is completely clear of all debris before storing in the fridge. The leftover katsuobushi (bonito flakes) and kombu seaweed can be used for other things. I like to chop of kombu and stir fry it with katsuobushi, sesame seeds and a bit of teriyaki type sauce for making furikake which sometimes is used in plain rice in Japan or onigiri rice balls. This is my first one tsuyu recipe and I do have several versions of tsuyu and I plan to post additional ones in the future. The cup size I'm using is the Japanese cup size which is 200 ml = 1 Cup. When I mention soy sauce, I'm referring to the regular soy sauce and not light soy sauce which has more salt content and less color.

    Recipe #342216

    This is shojin ryori or vegetarian temple cooking, a Buddhist vegetarian style of cooking in Japan. There are many versions of blunt knife pounded cucumber salads but this one is very nice. Often cucumber is pounded with a blunt side of a chef's knife or small stick lightly to break down the cucumber flesh in the middle so that cucumbers can be eaten in bigger chunks and flavor able to penetrate better. Japanese, English, or hot house cucumbers work best here, but if using thick skinned American style cucumber, cut in lengthwise in half and remove seeds first before proceeding.

    Recipe #343365

    I've been making this for years. I took a recipe and changed it, it had 30g of carrots, and I like about equal weight of carrot and daikon. I make this using my zester which is nothing like a Microplane zester. It's small, hand held tool (with 6 holes at one end) which you drag down the food to get long thin ribbons. Works really well for these Japanese salads.

    Recipe #95802

    This light, refreshing salad is a great start to any Japanese meal. I enjoy this fresh salad as a starter to a sushi dinner or alone for a light lunch. This is also a basic recipe to prepare.

    Recipe #290066

    Sticky, chewy mochi Taiwanese/Japanese style. All you need is a microwave! Recipe can be multiplied, but I usually just make a small batch.

    Recipe #126014

    These are so yummy! I haven't tried the miso one (yet! But once I get my paws on some miso paste. . .), but the soy sauce ones are fantastic. This is fairly typical bar food in Japan from what I have read online, but it also makes for good lunchbox food or a side dish for a Japanese inspired dinner. You can also make a bunch of these and freeze them for up to a month. This recipe comes from Bento Boxes: Japanese Meals To Go by Naomi Kijima - hence the single serving size. Cooking time does not include time to cook rice. I posted photos to try and make clear the grill, flip, brush, flip, brush, flip, done routine. Hope this helps. :)

    Recipe #238542

    This recipe is from a great Japanese food site, Just Hungry. This is a Japanese style instant pickle, not one meant to be preserved like Western style pickles. These sweet and sour and salty pickles should be eaten within a few days, and kept in the refrigerator. This uses the fueru (or kind that just requires soaking) type of wakame

    Recipe #329663

    DH and I have made this dish for dinner on several occasions and think it is delicious. It is another winner from Keiko O Aiko's "Easy and Healthy Japanese Food for the American Kitchen." What really makes the dish is the sliced onions--don't be afraid to use more!! One thing to watch out for is that the thin chops tend to dry up quickly and the sauce reduces quickly, which can leave you wanting for more sauce. We have also used thick chops with great results. I should mention that I always use reduced sodium soy sauce (I prefer San-J Tamari).

    Recipe #288905

    This recipe comes from Saveur magazine, and it tastes just like the curry we had in Japan. It seems to be a forgiving recipe: I used a sprinkle of dry ginger instead of fresh, left out the bay leaf, used 1/2 cup of apple sauce instead of a grated apple, used chicken bullion instead of stock and used ketchup instead of crushed tomatoes. Serve with freshly steamed rice. It doesn't take a long time to make, and isn't complicated although it has a long list of ingredients. Edit - A few reviewers think that 1/2 cup of applesauce makes it too sweet, so please adjust to your tastes if you decide to substitute it for the apple :-)

    Recipe #215843

    I was recently digging through some recipes that my parent's Japanese maid used while my father (US Navy) was stationed in Yokosuka, Japan during the late '60's and found this really easy salad.

    Recipe #278729

    My kids like this because the cabbage is cooked well in this recipe and doesn't have that raw feel to it. I use package coleslaw in this as it means I can get dinner on the table quickly when I need to. I've tried other recipes, but the batter seems really bland to me. This version uses dashi, sake and soy sauce, which makes it seem more home-flavored to me. Add in whatever other protein sources along with or in lieu of the ham...I've seen shrimp, tuna, imitation crab and crab used with great success. Just make sure that there's enough batter to hold everything together.

    Recipe #227518

    4 Reviews |  By seb

    From Hawai'i's BEST Mochi Recipes. Substitute raspberry pie filling for blueberry for mochi that is just are wonderful.

    Recipe #43303

    Quick and easy dish, and it's delicious! It's important to use mirin as sherry/other wine does not give the authentic taste of shogayaki. Serve it with steamed cabbage/other vegetables and japanese rice for a yummy meal! You can substitute pork with sliced beef too.

    Recipe #77183

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