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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / Israel
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    82 recipes in

    Israel

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    5 Reviews |  By Mirj

    A very Middle Eastern spice mix, I use it in almost everything that has even a hint of the Mediterranean. Sprinkle this over a plate of hummous, dip some pita in olive oil and za'atar, have some lemonade with mint and you're in paradise.

    Recipe #16621

    8 Reviews |  By Mirj

    This is a hot salsa that the Yemenite Jews eat with everything. My neighbor always makes tons of it to distribute to all her married children each week (I sometimes wish I were one of them).

    Recipe #15196

    4 Reviews |  By Mirj

    Basboosa are thin semolina squares covered in a honey and lemon syrup. Very Middle Eastern, this goes great with some sweet Turkish coffee or some mint tea.

    Recipe #74312

    1 Reviews |  By Mirj

    Spongy lechuch, made of yeast dough, is served with hot soups and with dips. The preparation is simple, and is done in a frying pan rather than an oven. The result is something between a pita and a pancake, which can be dipped in tehina, simply spread with honey, eaten as is or torn up into a hot bone soup. I've always managed to scrounge some off my Yemenite friends, but have grown so addicted to the stuff thought it would be a better idea if I just made it myself. This recipe comes from Ha'aretz.

    Recipe #100707

    1 Reviews |  By Mirj

    From Norene Gilletz's Pleasures of Your Processor, for Polly

    Recipe #16411

    2 Reviews |  By Mirj

    As Polly requested, this one is based on the Moosewood cookbook.

    Recipe #16400

    2 Reviews |  By byZula

    This unique Yemenite bread, which is baked all night in a tightly covered dish, is prepared for Sabbath breakfast or brunch. It defies all the usual rules for bread baking--it bakes at a very low temperature rather than at high heat, and it is baked covered, so it steams, rather than uncovered. And it is absolutely delicious. When I prepared this for a cooking class on Jewish breads in California, the students were wild about it. Before baking, you can put a few eggs (in their shells) in the baking dish; they come out brown and are a good accompaniment for the bread. In some families, this bread is served with sugar for sprinkling; in others, it is accompanied by Yemenite Tomato Salsa and Hot Pepper-Garlic Chutney.

    Recipe #106506

    1 Reviews |  By byZula

    Mahlouach (pronounced “mah-lou-wach”) sounds suspiciously like mallah, an Arabic precursor to phyllo dough. This puff pastry-like pancake bread is served fried, both in Yemenite restaurants and in homes. Like Yemenite Sabbath breads kubbanah and jahnoun, mahlouach is so popular with Israelis that it is made commercially and sold frozen in supermarkets around the country. Eat as is, dipped in hot sauce or soup, or filled like a crepe with spinach or meat. From ‘The Foods of Israel Today’.

    Recipe #183087

    7 Reviews |  By alAmira

    I learned this while living in Jordan. The family I stayed with introduced me to fried cauliflower, and this was the sauce they used over the top.

    Recipe #84654

    45 Reviews |  By Dee514

    I've had this recipe for about 30 years and I really can't remember where I got it from. Since I never owned a "yogurt maker", I always used this method. The recipe makes a surprisingly good "plain" yogurt. Cook/prep times do not include the 4 hour setting time or the 8 hour chilling time. **Note: After you make your first batch of homemade yogurt, you can use your homemade plain yogurt as the starter for future batches.

    Recipe #32460

    This is a very tasty yemenite hot sauce recipe which comes from Joan Nathan. It is a great condiment with real heat and flavour. It can be used in spreads, salad dressings, soups, marinades. You name it. Enjoy!

    Recipe #57689

    For anyone who desires an authentic taste of the mid east. This recipe was learned by watching a good friend of mine in Jordan when she was grinding her family's monthly supply.

    Recipe #79179

    This baba ganoush recipe is from Williams-Sonoma's Small Plates by Joanne Wier, published 1998

    Recipe #67570

    After searching high and low in my town for a jar of tahini, I couldn't find any! I went searching online and found this easy recipe. This is MUCH cheaper to make yourself, and only takes a couple minutes.

    Recipe #73859

    THE ubiquitous sauce of Morocco! Whether a version such as this one or simply thinned down tomato concentrate/paste it is everywhere. Made at home 2-5 times a week and more like 3-6 times at my home! We adore this sauce which is actually meant for dipping your bread into and then scooping up a piece of meat or veg. from the communal platter. It is also served with homemade french fries,poured into hot sandwiches and mixed into spaghetti/macaroni,rice. c.2005

    Recipe #130945

    Ras el hanout is a North African Spice and it's name translates loosely to "House Blend". It can contain as many as 50 ingredients including rosebuds and Spanish fly. This is a simple mix I'm submitting here. I've been lucky to be given some, but I'll be posting recipes using it, so thought others might like this recipe.It's apparently good for poultry, rabbit, pork, seafood eggs, vegetables, soups, tagines, braises, sautes, roasts, pastas, risotto and cooked pulses, It can also be mixed with flour to dust or coat food!!!

    Recipe #80983

    This is more a technique than "amounts" recipe though the ratio of salt to lemon must be measured. While the bottles and jars of preserved lemons in the souk are wonderful to look at, they are by in large for the tourists and at times are unhealthy. Nearly every Moroccan home which uses preserved lemon makes it's own preserved lemons and these quarters are the most common as they are ready prepared to use and serve. The entire lemon piece can be used in "some" recipes though the most common is to use only the rind. Please friends do not ask about the time I tried to eat a preserved lemon quarter "as is!!" Preserved lemons lend a wonderful tangysalt flavour to especially chicken and gorgeous with fish and soups! Make sure that when using you remove the pulp using only the rind. Enjoy! c.\2003

    Recipe #135134

    From Aglaia Kremezi. The Lebanese believe that zaatar, a mixture of thyme, sumac and sesame seeds, gives strength and clears the mind. For this reason, before leaving home on exam days, all school children eat a slice of bread spread with a mixture of zaatar and olive oil. The traditional recipe for zaatar calls for thyme, but savory -- which has an aroma similar to a combination of oregano and thyme -- works much better.

    Recipe #65710

    8 Reviews |  By Rita~

    The fragrance of this is heavenly. It 's a Middle Eastern mix. It 's very flexible some put paprika and cumin some keep it simple just peppercorns, cinnamon & nutmeg. I came up with this recipe because I was making Jewelies Grilled Pineapple and Banana With Honey #94074. This is used in puddings, pies, cakes and biscuits.

    Recipe #94921

    2 Reviews |  By Mirj

    This is adapted from the December 2003 issue Bon Appetit, and has to be one of the reasons I pay the extra $$$ for an international subscription. I've made this twice already, once to keep for my very own and once to give as gifts, using pretty oil bottles with pouring spouts. This oil is wonderful in some pasta or grilled fish. You can also use it to make extra-special brushetta. Oh, and don't even think of using dried herbs instead of the fresh!

    Recipe #85544

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