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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / INDONESIA COOKBOOK
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    62 recipes in

    INDONESIA COOKBOOK

    For my first visit in Asia
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    5 Reviews |  By awalde

    Impress your friends with these beautiful spiced hard boiled eggs! Feel free to change or substitute ingredients depending on what is available, and on desired intensity of color. With food coloring this should work as well, but I did not try it!

    Recipe #462574

    15 Reviews |  By Zurie

    Wanted to keep this recipe a secret! But what the heck -- I enjoy Zaar so much, why be miserly?? Years ago I cut the recipe from a newspaper food column, and it hides, yellowed, in an old recipe scrapbook. I make it every now and then and I guarantee that it's a quick, easy, gourmet meal! The original recipe specified rice vinegar, but I use balsamic. EDITED ON JAN 8, 2010: Although I posted the recipe as I use it, it seems the 1 cup water specified caused problems for some cooks, so I've lessened the amount. If you use only 1/2 cup as below, do keep a close eye on the reducing sauce in case it thickens too much. And please -- DO taste the sauce before removing from the heat. Some people like it with more hot pepper, and some may want to tweak the other ingredients. Chicken breast is a little too dry for this recipe, so I stand by the point that thighs, even with skin, are the better option.

    Recipe #206167

    Gathered from an Indonesian website-kokkieblanda, this is a nice blend of vegetables and flavors.

    Recipe #187213

    These crispy shallots make a great topping for steaks, salads, and soups and are used throughout Indonesia! Use the leftover frying oil for vinaigrettes and for sauteing anything savory. Adapted from Saveur magazine.

    Recipe #188440

    This is one of the best-known Indonesian dishes and one of the easiest to make. The garnishes give contrasting flavors and textures to the dish. Try it!

    Recipe #44512

    This ketchup is great! Serve it with just about anything, pancakes, omelettes, potatoes, tempeh, and it will always compliment! Adapted from Mollie Katzen's Sunlight Cafe cookbook. Did you know mangoes are members of the sumac family and are related to cashews? In the tropical zones where they grow, mango groves are a real sight: the trees, with their thick umbrella of shiny leaves, form a true oasis-and the fruit grows like giant upside down lollipops on long stems, hanging down.

    Recipe #404352

    This is sooo good... pork and onions simmered with coconut milk, soy sauce, cumin, coriander and ginger, sweetened with a little molasses and spiked with chili sauce... The pork can marinate for up to about a day and a half; then simmer away and dish up on a bed of rice.

    Recipe #114233

    A great salad from Africa with Malaysian influence! You may add or change vegetables. You may also use the peanut sauce provided or use your own!

    Recipe #173967

    A colorful dish that pleases the eye and the palate. Make it as spicy as you dare! Great served with Recipe #47554. This recipe is from Moosewood Restaurant's Low-Fat Favorites, a great cookbook.

    Recipe #47552

    I bought a jar of Kokita brand Nasi Goreng seasoning at the Uwajimaya store in Seattle and it made the best fried rice I had ever eaten. After scraping the last bits from the side of the jar, I didn't want to make the hour drive just for more (although it was tempting), so I improvised based on the ingredients. If you can find it, I highly suggest buying the pre-made product as it makes preparation very simple. After eating Indonesian fried rice I haven't been able to go back to making the more popular Chinese version. What makes this different than Chinese rice is the prominence of chili rather than soy sauce. Shallots, smaller and milder than the onion, are a pleasant addition. I like to add a lot of chili and use fish sauce as the source of saltiness. Many recipes call for shrimp paste, I haven't tried it and think it's just fine without since the fish sauce adds a seafood taste. There are other posted recipes for this dish, but this one is simpler and the eggs can be cooked right in with the rice. This is also great as a vegetarian (even vegan) dish, just omit the shrimp and use fried tofu instead of egg and use soy instead of fish sauce. Warning: this may be spicy for those with more delicate palates.

    Recipe #112291

    I usually serve this fluffy, fragrant rice with Malaysian chicken curry - absolute heaven!

    Recipe #69488

    I clipped this from a magazine a long time ago. It's really good on ice cream or over pound cake. It's fairly easy to make. Just be careful of the hot sugar! NOTE: Cooking time is an estimate (I can't remember!)

    Recipe #386042

    These look good! From the book, Caramel Knowledge

    Recipe #178928

    Recipe #410998

    These cookies are from an old Bon Appetit magazine. I piped them out using a serrated tip, and they looked so pretty! I've put them on quite a few Christmas trays.

    Recipe #87993

    A wonderful rub for beef. Especially for quality steaks. I have given this as Christmas gifts. Either in 1/4 or 1/3 cup jars each.

    Recipe #249696

    This recipe is native to Eastern Java, because in this recipe, we use Petis Udang. Petis Udang is translated as Shrimp Paste. Don't get confused with Dried Shrimp Paste, that is translated as Terasi Udang in Indonesian. This Petis Udang is a common ingredient for Eastern Java style cook.

    Recipe #184218

    I have cooked this dish for more then 25 years and the only thing I have changed about it is that I don't eat it on the day I cook it. I put it in the fridge for up to 2 days or freeze it, (leaving the leaves in), until I need it. This has two reasons, the flavors improve and as the cook I find you can enjoy it more because the smell of the spices, when cooking lessens your appetite.

    Recipe #42436

    This drink is native to Aceh, one province in Sumatera island, Indonesia. It is used to serve with Aceh Style Fried Noodle aka Mie Aceh

    Recipe #183793

    Posted for Zaar World Tour VI.

    Recipe #423226

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