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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / Healthy for the Holidays II
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    274 recipes in

    Healthy for the Holidays II

    A compilation of healthy recipes from all the players in the Healthy for the Holidays Challenge running from November 25 to December 31.
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    Only three main ingredients! Recipes really can't get much simpler! And there are times when such recipes come in handy! I haven't made this one yet. I found it in the October 2005 issue of the Australian magazine 'Delicious' and I have adapted it for posting for the 2005 Zaar World Tour, as both an Australian (and in view of its combining of lemon juice and cumin) and as a Middle Eastern recipe. My recommendation would be to make this recipe when sweet baby carrots are available. Depending on the size and juiciness of your carrots, you may need to use slightly more or slightly less lemon juice: use your culinary discretion! If the carrots are really juicy, mop up some of the juiciness with paper towels so that you can still add a generous amount of lemon juice. Again, use your culinary discretion! Preparation and cooking times will vary, depending on the choices you make with ingredients and the way you choose to cook the carrots. My estimated preparation and cooking times are based on the option of using baby carrots and boiling them in salt water: the fastest of the alternatives. Personally, if time permits, I'd recommend baking the carrots, brushed with a little olive oil, in the oven.

    Recipe #139963

    A simple, quick to make, low-fat and delicious anytime mushroom lovers' snack that I have adapted from a recipe I found in the November 2005 issue of the Australian magazine 'Table: easy family food for every day of the week'. I am posting it for the 2005 Zaar World Tour.

    Recipe #140898

    I’ve posted this recipe as an accompaniment to my Recipe #120175 which uses Preserved Lemons. I usually buy preserved lemons at a delicatessen, but following a query during the 2005 Zaar World Tour, I decided to post this recipe for preparing them. It is from a Murdoch books’ publication: ‘Mediterranean kitchen’, and I am posting it as a recipe for any regional recipe which calls for the use of preserved lemons. In particular, preserved lemons are a specialty of Morocco. “They are traditionally served with dishes such a grilled (broiled) meats or used to flavour couscous, tagines, stuffings and casseroles They can lend an intense citrus tang to a surprising variety of savoury dishes, such as prawn (shrimp) skewers, risotto, pasta and vinaigrettes. Only the rind is used in cooking. Discard the flesh and bitter pith, rinse and finely slice or chop the rind before adding it to the dish. Preserved lemons can be stored for up to six months in a cool, dark place.” This is a recipe where to specify the preparation time is somewhat difficult. I have simply listed the initial preparation time! After this preparation, the preserved lemons won't actually be ready for use for about 6 weeks! So if you need them immediately, buy them at a delicatessen. But since they are SO easy to make, you may well want to make some for future use!

    Recipe #140971

    A simple Middle Eastern salad which provides a refreshing complement to Middle Eastern dishes or which can be served as one of a range of dishes in a mezze spread; or be used with falafel and hummus in pita bread.

    Recipe #141375

    Middle Eastern Lemonade is something I've often drunk - and loved - in Middle Eastern restaurants, but this is the first recipe for it I've come across. The lemonade I've been served in Middle Eastern restaurants - and this recipe - are NOT at all sweet, which is actually exactly how I like it (!) so I've left the recipe as I found it in Christine Osborne's 'Middle Eastern Food and Drink', but where the recipe lists among the ingredients "sugar syrup to taste", I'm adding the alternative "or sugar to taste"! I'm posting this for the 2005 Zaar World Tour. For orange blossom water, look in Indian, Greek or Lebanese grocery stores. I haven't made this recipe yet, but I'd be inclined to make it with a mix of limes and lemons. I'm posting it for the 2005 Zaar World Tour.

    Recipe #141382

    A wonderfully refreshing drink popular throughout the Middle East. This particular version of it is from Iran, and is from the Bay Books' publication: 'The Best of Lebanese and Middle Eastern Cooking'. It is impossible to provide "accurate" freezing times for this recipe, as it's really up to you - and also of course to the efficiency of your fridge - just how many times you repeat step 4. When I've made this, I've repeated this step three times, so that's what I've calculated into the "cooking time". For this recipe "cooking time" = freezing time. This is, therefore, obviously a prepare-ahead drink/dessert, and one which is ideally made when you are in the kitchen preparing other dishes. I'm posting it for the 2005 Zaar World Tour. Orange-blossom water can be purchased from Middle Eastern grocery stores. I'd recommend making this Sharbat with fresh oranges and lemons, and with natural spring water or filtered water. And to use more or less sugar, to satisfy your taste preferences.

    Recipe #141384

    These herby potato cakes can be served as an appetiser with sour cream or tzazikki, as an accompaniment to grilled or roasted fish or meat, or with a salad as a flavoursome lunch, or as a snack. If serving as an appetiser, you'll probably want to make the cakes smaller. Adapted from 'Pan or Wok' recipes by International Masters Publishers.

    Recipe #123442

    An everyday lamb dish with a subtle blend of flavours, that you can enjoy at any time of the year, without needing to either heat the oven or set up the BBQ. Adapted from English chef Louise Blair’s ‘Low GI Cookbook’. Like garlic, lemon in recipes is one of those ingredients that most people seem to either love or hate. If you’re not fond of lemon juice, omit the lemon rind and juice; fry the lamb steaks in 1/4 tablespoon olive oil and consider substituting a little of the vegetable stock for wine, perhaps a merlot or a dry white.

    Recipe #124181

    I have posted this delicious-sounding way to cook chicken – which you can have on the table in forty minutes - in response to a Forum Request for a recipe for Chinese-style Orange Chicken. I have adapted it from Lisa Pettit’s recipe in Prevention Healthy Cooking's 'Eat Up, Slim Down: Tried-and-true recipes and tips from real weight-loss winners' by Jane Kirby and David Joachim. Commenting on this recipe, Lisa says “When I’m craving Chinese-style sweet-and-sour chicken but don’t want the calories or fat, I turn to this recipe”. If you want to increase the orange flavour, substitute some of the soy sauce for orange juice: perhaps half soy sauce and half orange juice. This is a combination that I know works well in my Veal With Orange Sauce recipe #117835.

    Recipe #124299

    A delicious and unusual spaghetti dish, completely vegetarian, adapted from a recipe in Vicki Wild's 'Wild Sides: an A-Z of essential, exceptional vegetable side dishes'. Well this one is certainly exceptional - there was nothing even remotely like it already posted - but to me this is clearly a main course dish rather than a side dish. Depending on taste preferences, you may like to substitute some of the stock for wine. When I now make this, I use Recipe #135453 for the stock.

    Recipe #124598

    Chickpeas and apricots: now those are healthy ingredients in a muffin! This recipe was emailed to me from the Simply Great Meals Recipe Club. I haven't yet made it but it caught my attention because I was impressed by the healthy ingredients, particularly the inclusion of chickpeas and from a search on Zaar I couldn't find any muffin recipes containing chickpeas.

    Recipe #124642

    This is my adaptation of a Canyon Ranch Health Resort recipe from 'low-fat cooking guru' Jeanne Jones. It first caught my attention because of its low fat content; but with its fine blend of herbs, not surprisingly, it's also delicious. When I've served it, no one has in the least suspected that this is a low-fat recipe! I found it in Prevention Healthy Cooking's 'Eat up Slim down: tried-and-true recipes from real weight-loss winners' by Jane Kirby and David Joachim.

    Recipe #124839

    A delicious, creamy low calorie alternative to the more traditional white potato mash recipes which apparently is popular at many health spas. And you don't have to peel the sweet potatoes! Now that's a plus when time is scarce! Adapted from a recipe from the Spa at Doral, which I found in Prevention Healthy Cooking's 'Eat up; Slim down: tried-and-true recipes from real weight-loss winners' by Jane Kirby and David Joachim.

    Recipe #124938

    Risotto Cakes made in a mini-muffin pan. A great way to use leftover risotto to make lunchbox snacks. This is one of those basic recipe ideas that you can easily adapt to use up whatever odds and ends of ingredients you have on hand. And it's a recipe that can easily be doubled. I've not frozen these, but I've always found rice dishes freeze well, so I'm sure you'll find you can also freeze them.

    Recipe #133300

    Beef steaks stuffed with pesto, spinach, onion and garlic slow-cooked in a crockpot, served with a sauce made from the juices and a simple potato dish. Adapted from a recipe in Betty Crocker's "Slow Cooker Cookbook".

    Recipe #133460

    A delicious Thai salad which strikes the classic balance characteristic of Thai food between sour, salty, sweet and hot flavours. It contains lime (sour), fish sauce (salty), palm sugar (sweet) and chilli (hot). I have not made this, but if I were to do so, I would adjust the amounts to ensure it has only a smidgeon of heat! Or if I were feeling really cowardly (which is more likely), I’d simply leave out the chilli. Adjust the amounts to suit your tastes! This is another recipe I have found in the first edition - September 2005 - of the new Australian magazine 'Notebook: ideas for living'. We have a lot of Asian migrants in Australia, and as a result a lot of fabulous Asian restaurants (representing the cuisines of many different countries) and many of the recipes in our cooking magazines frequently reflect these influences. I know lots of people whose favourite cuisine is Thai, so I thought that this was a recipe worth sharing. Because I am on unfamiliar ground with a recipe like this, I've made NO changes to it. I am posting it here for the Zaar World Tour 2005.

    Recipe #135168

    Looking for Australian recipes for the Zaar World Tour 2005? Look no further! This is innovative Australian cuisine at its best: a most unusual and absolutely delicious-sounding recipe which I have adapted just slightly from a book I HAD TO BUY when I saw it today: 'Green: modern vegetarian recipes' by Australian cook Flip Shelton. As Flip says of this recipe you really can “brighten the darkest winter days with this warm, colourful salad”.

    Recipe #135365

    This is the stock used in a recipe I have just posted for Cashew and Leek Soup. It has been adapted from a book which I found today and just HAD TO BUY - 'Green: modern vegetarian recipes' by Australian cook Flip Shelton. I haven't tried any of the recipes yet, but all the recipes in the book sound wonderfully healthy; and this recipe is really quite different from the other vegetable stock recipes already posted. If you are wanting to make your own vegetable stock, you may want to combine the ideas here with another recipe. It's just that it could take a while to gather together the ingredients! As Flip says "It's so easy to make your own stock - plus it's a great way to use up things like vegetable peel (other than potato), carrot tops and bottoms, onion skins and the skinny inner stalks of celery. Start by saving well-washed vegetable peel in a plastic bag in the freezer. Keep adding to the bag until you have enough" to make this recipe. She doesn't mention making this in a crockpot, but this is where I'll be making it once I've got into the habit of saving the required ingredients!

    Recipe #135453

    I found this intriguing recipe in Australian chef Iain Hewitson's book 'Tales and Recipes from a Travelling Cook'. Having tracked down the best Irish stew in Ireland - that served at The Common's Restaurant in Dublin - he arranged for the chef to cook it for him, only to discover that the chef was a Frenchman! Huey reports that the chef was "a terrific cook" and that his Irish stew was "thankfully, absolutely delicious". I've not yet tried this recipe. I've posted it for the Zaar World Tour 2005.

    Recipe #135497

    A flavoursome and visually stunning recipe which will serve you equally well as an appetiser, as a light lunch or as part of a nearly vegetarian meal from Australian chef Iain Hewitson. This is a recipe which allows the key ingredients to be the stars: make sure you use the best quality ingredients you can find.

    Recipe #135885

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