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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / GG Carribbean Ckbk - 1st Submission
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    GG Carribbean Ckbk - 1st Submission

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    Based on a recipe from Heidi Haughy Cusick’s book, Soul and Spice, African Cooking in the Americas. This book is chock-filled with Caribbean, Bahia Brazilian, and Louisiana Creole recipes. She says, “The plethora of fruit available year-round for the picking contributes to its popularity as dessert all over the Caribbean. Here is a recipe that combines tropical fruits with a syrupy glaze of rum-flavored guava jelly. It is inspired by one that appeared in an old recipe collection from the island of St. Vincent. For a special occasion, serve the compote over Banana Coconut Bread and top it with a little whipped cream.” I haven’t tried this yet.

    Recipe #373843

    Based on a recipe from Heidi Haughy Cusick’s book, Soul and Spice, African Cooking in the Americas. This book is chock-filled with Caribbean, Bahia Brazilian, and Louisiana Creole recipes. She says, “This Caribbean mainstay is found on all the islands in a variety of forms. Sometimes it is cooked with pork; other times it is prepared with water, onions, and salt. The peas can also be cooked with coconut milk, and garlic, tomatoes, and green onions can be added. Curry power is another option. And the hot habanero (Scotch Bonnet) chile is optional. Pigeon peas are native to Africa and resemble black-eyed peas. They are pale yellow and have a small “eye”. In the West Indies, pigeon peas also go by goongoo, Congo, and gungo peas. The peas’ earthy flavor is wonderful; when these legumes are combined with rice the resulting texture is a mouthful to behold. In Cuba red beans and rice are called congri. A dish of black beans and rice on the island is called Moros y Christianos, for Moors and Christians. Cook time doesn’t include soaking the peas overnight. When I tried this, I added 2 tablespoons of liquid smoke along with smoked bacon in place of ham hocks (couldn't find) and our guests and we loved it! Nice backdrop to any dish that suggests a rice accompaniment.

    Recipe #374021

    Based on a recipe from Heidi Haughy Cusick’s book, Soul and Spice, African Cooking in the Americas. This book is chock-filled with Caribbean, Bahia Brazilian, and Louisiana Creole recipes. She says, “Known as tablette in the Caribbean and cocada in Bahia, this confection combines the Spanish and Portuguese penchant for sweets with the African resourcefulness for using available ingredients: sugar from the cane fields and the abundant adopted coconut. Easy to make, these candies have been satisfying sweet tooths in the Caribbean for two centuries.” Historical note: Sugarcane came to the Caribbean with Columbus on his second voyage in 1494, when he established the first European settlement in the West Indies on Hispaniola; unrefined brown sugar was most commonly used in households; it came in foots, hard cylinders that were grated for use. I haven’t tried this yet.

    Recipe #373982

    From the April 1991 issue of the sexy Chile Pepper magazine. The intro to the recipe says, “In many parts of the Caribbean, beans are called ‘peas.’ This recipe is a Bahamian variation on a dish which has numerous names throughout the Caribbean and Central and South America. Two ingredients are common to all of the variations: beans of some variety and rice. Other ingredients vary and coconut milk is commonly added. In spicy regions, chiles are added at the cook’s discretion.”

    Recipe #490449

    From Sarah Ainley’s book, The World’s Best Recipes, Caribbean section. “This dish was brought by East Indians to the West Indies.” Prep time doesn't include the 1 hour the lamb cubes marinate.

    Recipe #503716

    From Sarah Ainley’s book, The World’s Best Recipes, Caribbean section. “A smooth and luscious soup, so easy that you will make it with delight, over and over.” You may also use frozen spinach; if you’d like to substitute milk for the cream, use half stock and half milk.

    Recipe #503710

    From Sarah Ainley’s book, The World’s Best Recipes, Caribbean section. “This dish would be perfect for supper, served on a bed of noodles or with boiled plantains.” Prep time doesn’t include 30 minutes marinating time.

    Recipe #503711

    From Sarah Ainley’s book, The World’s Best Recipes, Caribbean section. TIP: you may need to use two limes, depending on their size and juiciness. Or, for a less sharp flavor, use lemons instead. Cook time doesn’t include several hours/overnight marinating time.

    Recipe #504287

    NOTE: Cooking time is refrigeration time. Serving size is a guess. This recipe was one of several passionfruit recipes in an expat magazine. I haven't tried them yet, but these little gelatin squares sound really good! Passionfruit is yellow here, and is sweeter than the purple variety found in the US. This may require that you add a bit more sugar, although a can of sweetened condensed mik sounds pretty sugary to me. Adjust sugar to your taste before adding the egg whites.

    Recipe #488872

    Just dreamed up this tropical concoction while cleaning my fridge. As in most of the Caribbean and the equatorial tropics, an overabundance of mangoes and mandarina limes was the greatest factor. Mandarina's are a funky-looking lime that grows in Costa Rica. They taste like a very, very sour mandarin orange. I'm sure you could use regular green limes or key limes. UPDATE: just tried this with a little bit of dark rum and boy, does it taste good!!!

    Recipe #480495

    This recipe comes from the box my Tommy "drink of the month" glasses came in. Sooooooo good!

    Recipe #486337

    I live on a hilltop in Costa Rica and have an over-abundance of mangoes and bananas growing wild all over our property - so when I found this wonderful recipe for Cuban Ahi with Banana-Mango Chutney by Chef Manami, I couldn't resist. It turned out wonderfully and I am posting the chutney by itself so I can group it in a separate cookbook. I've made some tweaks based on personal preference - but the original recipe is awesome. You can use just ripe bananas if you don't have green - but I like the texture when using both. Thank you, Manami!!!

    Recipe #479158

    Mangos, papayas and coconuts abound here in Costa Rica both on the Pacific side and on the Caribbean side - you can find them growing all over your yard and on the side of the road. Paradise! Nothing is better for quenching a tropical thirst than a "batido". This healthy smoothie contains most of my favorite fruits! No matter whether you're dreaming of Costa Rica, Puerto Rico, or the Virgin Islands - this wonderful concoction will have you humming "Kokomo" for days...

    Recipe #488352

    Note: COOKING TIME IS MACHINE TIME, does not include time in freezer. Having six mango trees within arms reach on our property, I'm a fanatic for mango recipes. The coconut rum give it that Caribbean feel! We've tried so many mango ice cream recipes, including some really good ones. But one thing I've found is that the mouthfeel of all the heavy cream was a bit gross. Here is a recipe that combines and tweaks some of my favorites, and uses a bit of sweetened condensed milk instead of cream for that "just right" amount of creamy mouthfeel. This is a rich and creamy ice cream, and I think you'll find it VERY pleasing! If you're alcohol-free, you can omit the rum but after a few days the ice cream may be hard.

    Recipe #500578

    Living in the tropics has taught me that even the good ole' faithful recipes get tweaked now and then! Like the traditional Pineapple Upside Down Cake, this one is yummy in a totally different way! Starfruit can be found throughout the Caribbean and Central America. Be sure your starfruits are very ripe, to the point where you might have to trim back some of the softer brown spots.

    Recipe #488871

    "Arrrg, mateys! Tis treasure ye seek, then Caribbean treasure ye will find in me proud beauty of a pudd'n!" This is a pirate's take on bread pudding, created for the Raiders of the Lost Pantry cooking contest. I think this would taste equally good if candied orange peel were to be substituted for the candied ginger (or maybe both!). I purposely made it a small yield recipe so that I could play with it without wasting a large pan of bread pudding, but it probably doubles or triples well, as do most bread puddings. Be sure to save the syrup from the candied ginger, as it makes a most amazing addition to many things, including pancakes, cocktails, and ice cream. YUM! You can save time by using store bought candied ginger. Cook/Prep time doesn't include drying time for the candied ginger.

    Recipe #501174

    A flavorsome concoction that will take you back to the USVI's every single time! From islandflave.com. PREP TIME DOES NOT INCLUDE 4 HOURS REFRIGERATION TIME.

    Recipe #504598

    A yummy tropical drink from Trinidad/Tobago. Passionfruit in the Caribbean and Central America are yellow and are sweeter than the purple ones found in the U.S. The purple ones also yield more juice. You might need to add more sugar if using the purple ones.

    Recipe #504601

    Deep fried cornmeal sticks - a popular treat in Puerto Rico. From islandflave.com. Serving size wasn't stated, so yield is a guess. PREP TIME INCLUDES REFRIGERATION AND COOL-OFF TIME

    Recipe #504609

    A lovely, Caribbean-inspired marinade. From Epicurious TV.

    Recipe #232644

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