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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / From Scratch Wisconsin Dutch
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    From Scratch Wisconsin Dutch

    Like most of the other national groups in America, the "Dutch" in Wisconsin came to this country to escape religious and political pressures. From the most part, they came from Northeastern Germany...Pomerania and Prussia. The newcomers found a country rich in deep loam and wild beauty. Inland waters were teeming with fish and the land would raise anything, but most importantly; it was a dairy country quite similar to the land of their birth and for which they would become famous here.
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    Avoid all the additives of commercially made drink by making your own with this easy recipe from the Wisconsin Dutch chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947. Lemon, orange, or pineapple juice, ginger ale, carbonated water or other beverages combine very well with this foundation recipe. For very large quantity, use 20 pounds cranberries, 5 gallons of water and 7 pounds of sugar.

    Recipe #332748

    A little bit fussy but great fun to make. From the Wisconsin Dutch chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947. Chilling time not included in preparation time.

    Recipe #331551

    1 Reviews |  By Molly53

    So easy to make and so delicious. From the Wisconsin Dutch chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947.

    Recipe #330033

    A dish really showing it's German origins from the Wisconsin Dutch chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947. Cooking time approximate, depending on how done you like your eggs.

    Recipe #331034

    An easy, savory morsel from the Wisconsin Dutch chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947.

    Recipe #331036

    1 Reviews |  By Molly53

    This is one of those homely, comforting kind of things that's so simple to make. From the Wisconsin Dutch chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947.

    Recipe #331066

    VERY easy and high in calcium. From the Wisconsin Dutch chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947.

    Recipe #331462

    Schnecken ("snail" in German) is slightly different depending upon the area of the country you're in, but all of them are absolutely wonderful with your morning coffee. This recipe is courtesy of the Prussian, Pomeranian and Westphalian immigrants who settled in the great Midwest of North America. From the Wisconsin Dutch chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947. Overnight chilling time not included in preparation time.

    Recipe #331642

    Serve piping hot! From the Wisconsin Dutch chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947

    Recipe #331469

    Quite inexpensive if your fisherman has been lucky! ;-) From the Wisconsin Dutch chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago

    Recipe #331651

    A really quick hors d'oeuvre to make from the Wisconsin Dutch chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947

    Recipe #329808

    As barefoot kids, many of us have enjoyed the experience of wading lake shallows or small creeks while turning over rocks to catch the "mudbugs" lurking beneath. The upper Midwest is a long way from the sea, but our streams and reservoirs are literally crawling with "little lake lobsters" - the common freshwater crawfish, crayfish, crawdad, mudbug or yabbies, as they're called in Australia. Call them what you will, only a few folks realize these miniature crustaceans are not only edible, but an outright delicacy and great fun to peel and eat. Cooling time not included in preparation time. From the Wisconsin Dutch chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947.

    Recipe #329986

    Squabs are young pigeons, much like what you'll you see in any city. Young pheasant, doves, or Cornish game hens are easily substituted for squab, if desired. This recipe is quite inexpensive if your hunter has been successful! From the Wisconsin Dutch chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947. Cooking time is approximate, depending on the thickness of the meat.

    Recipe #330845

    Quite inexpensive to make if your fisherman has been fortunate! From the Wisconsin Dutch chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947.

    Recipe #330171

    Simple and simply delicious. From the Wisconsin Dutch chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947.

    Recipe #329983

    Years ago when people visited large cities south or east of Chicago during the poultry season, the eye would catch the sign, 'Watertown Stuffed Geese." When traveling by train, on the menu card of the diner would be found, "Watertown Goose.” The geese that were raised and prepared for market in Watertown, Wisconsin found their way to tables of wealthy people in the east, New York, Boston, Philadelphia, and other eastern points which usually purchased the bulk of them. Orders were placed weeks and even months in advance and some wealthy families had standing orders from year to year to be certain of getting them. Quite inexpensive for you if your hunter has been successful! From the Wisconsin Dutch chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947. Times are approximate.

    Recipe #330841

    1 Reviews |  By Molly53

    A comfort food for those who already like spinach, and a great way to start loving this vegetable. If desired, substitute Swiss chard (silverbeet) for the spinach. If fresh spinach is unavailable, please feel free to sub frozen (thawed and drained). From the Wisconsin Dutch chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947.

    Recipe #331476

    An old-fashioned recipe from the Wisconsin Dutch section of the US Regional Cookbook, Chicago Culinary Arts Institute, 1947.

    Recipe #63694

    1 Reviews |  By Molly53

    "Rhubarb is much better in pies Sweet and sour, with strawberry complies It's good as gooseberry And tasty as cherry Please, have a slice -- do not be shy!" Try this favorite with a scoop of good vanilla ice cream! From the Wisconsin Dutch chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947.

    Recipe #332304

    So easy and quite elegant! Strawberries, grapefruit, oranges and some melons are also excellent choices, but benefit from pouring the kirsch over and chilling. From the Wisconsin Dutch chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947.

    Recipe #332305

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