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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / From-Scratch Pennsylvania Dutch Cooking
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    From-Scratch Pennsylvania Dutch Cooking

    Pennsylvania Dutch cooking is as simple, plain and wholesome as the people themselves-and as hearty. One of the most enlightening traditions of this "napkin under the chin" school of eating is the old one that every company table should include "seven sweets and seven sours" all served forth at once. The sweets might include currant or apple jelly, apple butter or applesauce, preserves such as quince, candied watermelon rind, or wild strawberry; and two or three pies such as schnitz, shoofly, cheese cake, or "funeral pie" made from dried raisins or sour cherries. The seven sours would embrace pickled onions, cauliflower or beets, cole slaw with the famous Dutch sour cream dressing, chow chow, dill pickles, pickled cabbage, green tomato relish, meat jelly, and spiced cucumbers. Sometimes, a secondary set of sours would appear according to season; such as ketchup, Dutch horseradish sauce made from the freshly grated root, mustard, and even fresh nasturtium seeds-these latter to be scattered in place of herbs over the salad (a good idea for our own green salads). The Dutch housewife used every edible part of the meat and it is from this thrifty economy that another of her most famous specialities is derived-scrapple (ponhaws). This was made from pork, sage, spices and grain, either cornmeal, oatmeal or buckwheat, and is not unlike the English custom of storing potted meats. After the scrapple had been prepared, it was stored in a cool place and set aside for future use. When served, it was cut in thin slices and fried in butter or bacon fat until crisp.
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    From Pennsylvania Dutch chapter of the US Regional Cookbook, Chicago Culinary Arts Institute, 1947. While this recipe is written in an old-fashioned way, it is perfectly safe if processed using modern methods. If you are unfamiliar with these techniques, please go to http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_home.html for the current information.

    Recipe #58860

    1 Reviews |  By Molly53

    A Pennsylvania Dutch recipe from the US Regional Cookbook, Chicago Culinary Arts Institute, 1947.

    Recipe #141187

    A perfect way to take advantage of those end-of-season tomatoes. A Pennsylvania Dutch recipe from the US Regional Cookbook, Chicago Culinary Arts Institute, 1947. Cooking time includes sealing time. While this recipe is written in an old-fashioned way, it is perfectly safe if processed using modern methods. If you are unfamiliar with these techniques, please go to http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_home.html for the current information.

    Recipe #141189

    A delicious candy from the Pennsylvania Dutch chapter of the US Regional Cookbook, Chicago Culinary Arts Institute, 1947. Cooking time is estimated.

    Recipe #141193

    This spicy-sweet celebration of autumnal harvest comes from the Pennsylvania Dutch chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947. While this recipe is written in an old-fashioned way, it is perfectly safe if processed using modern methods. If you are unfamiliar with these modern methods, please go to http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_home.html for the current information.

    Recipe #256737

    Sweet as a summer's kiss, this delicious cake comes from the Pennsylvania Dutch chapter of the United States Regional cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947.

    Recipe #257309

    If you happen to have a hickory tree, this recipe is for you. From the Pennsylvania Dutch chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947.

    Recipe #258221

    From the Pennsylvania Dutch chapter of The United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947. Pickling time not included in preparation time. This fermentation method of pickling was more common then and is similar to the way sauerkraut is made.

    Recipe #188819

    1 Reviews |  By Molly53

    The perfect way to use up that end-of-season bounty from the garden. From the Pennsylvania Dutch chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947. While this recipe is written in an old-fashioned way, it is perfectly safe if processed using modern methods. If you are unfamiliar with these modern techniques, please go to http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_home.html for the current information.

    Recipe #256767

    1 Reviews |  By Molly53

    This heirloom recipe used a method no longer in common practice, so I have included more modern directions. From the Pennsylvania Dutch chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947.

    Recipe #256991

    1 Reviews |  By Molly53

    Have any of those hidden cucumbers revealed themselves now that the garden is nearly done? Cooking time approximate. From the Pennsylvania Dutch chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947. While this recipe is written in an old-fashioned way, it is perfectly safe if processed using modern methods. If you are unfamiliar with these techniques, please go to http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_home.html for the current information.

    Recipe #257152

    A terrific tangy side to any type of meat. From the Pennsylvania Dutch chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947.

    Recipe #261799

    1 Reviews |  By Molly53

    A great way to bump up dietary fiber and part of your five-a-day plan. Comfort food from the Pennsylvania Dutch chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947.

    Recipe #262135

    A thrifty way to use up green tomatoes left on the vines after the first frost. From the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947. While this recipe is written in an old-fashioned way, it is perfectly safe if processed using modern methods. If you are unfamiliar with these modern methods, please go to http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_home.html for the current information.

    Recipe #257135

    5 Reviews |  By Molly53

    Learned to love this when we lived in Pennsylvania. It's a special treat for my son. From the US Regional Cookbook, Chicago Culinary Arts Institute, 1947

    Recipe #56962

    1 Reviews |  By Molly53

    A spicy memory of sweet summer from Pennsylvania Dutch country. Any good preserving pear may be used, but the Seckel is preferred. From the US Regional Cookbook, Chicago Culinary Arts Institute, 1947. Cooking time is approximate. While this recipe is written in an old-fashioned way, it is perfectly safe if processed using modern methods. If you are unfamiliar with these techniques, please go to http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_home.html for the current information.

    Recipe #71270

    A wonderful way to take advantage of those end-of-season garden vegetables. From the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947. Flour is no longer recommended in canning recipes. If you wish to boiling water process this recipe, omit it. While this recipe is written in an old-fashioned way, it is perfectly safe if processed using modern methods. If you are unfamiliar with these techniques, please go to http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_home.html

    Recipe #256993

    Sub other berries, if you wish. From the Pennsylvania Dutch chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947.

    Recipe #257137

    A drink almost as old as civilization. The name derives from the ancient words for honey. This recipe was used as early as 1818. Fermentation and standing time not included in preparation time. From the Pennsylvania Dutch chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947.

    Recipe #257140

    A lot like apple pie without the crust, this old Pennsylvania Dutch recipe is perfect for gluten-free diets. From the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947.

    Recipe #258228

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