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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / From Scratch New England Cooking
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    From Scratch New England Cooking

    When the Pilgrim fathers arose from their knees around Plymouth Rock, they were at once confronted with the problem of provisions. The reported codfish were more difficult to catch than anticipated, and the other seafood set poorly on the stomachs of the travelers after such a long time at sea. The local natives taught the new immigrants how to survive and thrive. In the very earliest period, the mainstay of the settlers was corn, beans, fish, and game. From this time, come baked beans, succotash, corn puddings, johnnycakes and fish chowders. For sweetening, they relied upon the sugar maple. Winter supplies were stored in the cellar-root vegetables, pumpkins and winter squash, and apples. There, too, were also stored jellies, preserved fruits and berries, and barrels of sauerkraut and salt pork. There is still a definite English influence in many New England dishes. The influence is most noticeable in the meat and fish potpies and steamed puddings; these dishes, however, also reflect the touch of New England master cooks.
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    A sweet, Nor'Eastern soft pickle reminiscent of bread and butter pickles. Courtesy of The Pickled Pantry by Andrea Chesman via Mother Earth News.

    Recipe #506069

    This flaky, tender Boston cod pie will be especially apropos for those first brisk days of autumn. It is adapted from New England settlers' daily faare when cod was a staple and important for the New World's thriving economy. From an old newspaper clipping.

    Recipe #387846

    1 Reviews |  By Molly53

    An old timey recipe from the US Regional Cookbook, Chicago Culinary Arts Institute, 1947. While this recipe is written in an old-fashioned way, it is perfectly safe if processed using modern methods. If you are unfamiliar with these modern techniques, please go to http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_home.html for the current information.

    Recipe #65272

    1 Reviews |  By Molly53

    The original mincemeat. According to the cookbook, mincemeat pie was always served hot. From the New England chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Institute of Chicago, 1947

    Recipe #188147

    Ruby-red and sweetly delicious. The nutritional information is skewed because the amount of sugar depends on how much fruit liquid is rendered. From the New England chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947. While this recipe is written in an old-fashioned way, it is perfectly safe if processed using modern methods. If you are unfamiliar with these techniques, please go to http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_home.html for the current information.

    Recipe #292345

    This is a recipe from the New England section of the US Regional Cookbook, Chicago Culinary Arts Institute, 1947. This condiment adds a piquant flavor to any poultry or pork dish. While this recipe is written in an old-fashioned way, it is perfectly safe if processed using modern methods. If you are unfamiliar with these techniques, please go to http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_home.html for the current information.

    Recipe #56954

    Beautifully pure and simple, this jelly comes from the New England chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947. Chilling time not included in preparation time.

    Recipe #269963

    A pioneer recipe originating from the great state of Maine. From the New England chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947. While this recipe is written in an old-fashioned way, it is perfectly safe if processed using modern methods. If you are unfamiliar with these modern methods, please go to http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_home.html for the current information.

    Recipe #292406

    A very flavorful applesauce from the New England chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947

    Recipe #294454

    1 Reviews |  By Molly53

    Extra apple-y and silkily delicious. From the New England chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947.

    Recipe #296848

    An old fashioned recipe from the New England chapter of the US Regional Cookbook, Chicago Culinary Arts Institute, 1947. While this recipe is written in an old-fashioned way, it is perfectly safe if processed using modern methods. If you are unfamiliar with these techniques, please go to http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_home.html for the current information.

    Recipe #75164

    1 Reviews |  By Molly53

    Spicily sweet and as lusciously colored as rubies. From the New England chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947. While this recipe is written in an old-fashioned way, it is perfectly safe if processed using modern methods. If you are unfamiliar with these modern methods, please go to http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_home.html for the current information.

    Recipe #292240

    A spicily sweet preserve from the New England chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947. While this recipe is written in an old-fashioned way, it is perfectly safe if processed using modern methods. If you are unfamiliar with these techniques, please go to http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_home.html for the current information.

    Recipe #292283

    Very spicy and beautifully sweet preserves from the New England chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947. This recipe makes about 3 pints and cooking time is approximate. While this recipe is written in an old-fashioned way, it is perfectly safe if processed using modern methods. If you are unfamiliar with these techniques, please go to http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_home.html for the current information.

    Recipe #292285

    1 Reviews |  By Molly53

    A beautiful condiment from the New England chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947. While this recipe is written in an old-fashioned way, it is perfectly safe if processed using modern methods. If you are unfamiliar with these modern methods, please go to http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_home.html for the current information.

    Recipe #294207

    1 Reviews |  By Molly53

    Just lovely on a cold day. From the New England chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947. A nice variation is to add some ginger root to the boiling water.

    Recipe #294222

    A steamed pudding from the New England chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947. Just lovely served with cream, lightly sweetened whipped cream or vanilla ice cream.

    Recipe #294530

    A thrifty, sentimental dish from the New England chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947. Serve warm with cream, lightly sweetened whipped cream or vanilla ice cream. Cooking time approximate.

    Recipe #294582

    Use a good quality baking apple for the best flavor in this pudding. Just lovely served warm with cream, lightly sweetened whipped cream, or vanilla ice cream. From the New England chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947.

    Recipe #294589

    A very traditional recipe imported by our first settlers from England. Just lovely garnished with hard sauce. From the New England chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947.

    Recipe #294728

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