Recipe Sifter

X
  • Start Here
    • Course
    • Main Ingredient
    • Cuisine
    • Preparation
    • Occasion
    • Diet
    • Nutrition
1

Select () or exclude () categories to narrow your recipe search.

2

As you select categories, the number of matching recipes will update.

Make some selections to begin narrowing your results.
  • Calories
  • Amount per serving
    1. Total Fat
    2. Saturated Fat
    3. Polyunsat. Fat
    4. Monounsat. Fat
    5. Trans Fat
  • Cholesterol
  • Sodium
  • Potassium
  • Total Carbohydrates
    1. Dietary Fiber
    2. Sugars
  • Protein
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin B6
  • Vitamin B12
  • Vitamin C
  • Calcium
  • Iron
  • Vitamin E
  • Magnesium
  • Alcohol
  • Caffeine
  • Find exactly what you're looking for with the web's most powerful recipe filtering tool.

    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / From Scratch Midwest Cooking
    Lost? Site Map
    food image

    168 recipes in

    From Scratch Midwest Cooking

    West to the Easterner; East to the Westerner; truly middle east geographically, the Mississippi Vally, usually thought of as that part of the country drained by the upper half of the river is symbolized by the adventurous, pioneering spirit pervading its occupants. Energy and perseverance on the part of the homemaker, plus plenty of dairy products and eggs from local farms, have earned the country food of the Midwest an enviable reputation.
    « Previous 1 2 3 4 . . . 7 8 9 Next »
    Displaying up to 20 pages of results. To see all results, or register.

    An old-fashioned candy from the Mississippi Valley chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947. From David S in Nashville: Candies are usually stirred constantly until they come to a boil. The sugar needs to be completely dissolved before it comes to a boil. After the candy comes to a boil you need to let it boil without stirring. It's also important that the candy cool down undisturbed to the proper temperature before beating it.

    Recipe #343598

    3 Reviews |  By Molly53

    A delicious, unusual fruit spread at its best when the fruit is very ripe. From the Mississippi Valley chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947. Cooking time is approximate.

    Recipe #227839

    Gather these berries after the first frost for best flavor. Cooking time is approximate. From the Mississippi Valley chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947. While this recipe is written in an old-fashioned way, it is perfectly safe if processed using modern methods. If you are unfamiliar with these techniques, please go to http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_home.html for the current information. Temperature test: The jam is ready when the temperature registers 105C (221F) on a sugar thermometer. Simply immerse the thermometer in the jam shortly before the specified cooking time is completed, keeping it away from the base and the sides of the pan. Leave in position until the temperature has been reached. Boil a little longer if necessary. Saucer test: Drop a spoonful of the jam on to a chilled saucer and leave to cool slightly. Push your finger through the jam: if the surface wrinkles, the jam is ready. Return to the heat and boil a little longer if necessary. Flake test: Using a large wooden spoon, lift a little of the jam out of the pan. Let it cool slightly then tip the spoon so that the jam drops back into the pan. If it has been boiled for long enough, drops of the syrup will run together along the edge of the spoon and form flakes which will break off sharply. Boil a little longer if necessary.

    Recipe #227986

    Try these delicious, buttery morsels with your afternoon tea or with some delicious ice cream. From the Mississippi Valley chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947. Chilling time not included in preparation time.

    Recipe #326891

    2 Reviews |  By Molly53

    Cooking and preparation time approximate. From the Mississippi Valley chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947.

    Recipe #327808

    An old fashioned, delicious fruit spread from the Mississippi Valley chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947.

    Recipe #328246

    A sweet way to use nature's bounty! From the Mississippi Valley chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947.

    Recipe #328277

    A sweet little accompaniment to any meal. Nice as is, but may be colored with food coloring for extra visual punch. From Home Preserving Made Easy. Cooking time approximate. While this recipe is written in an old-fashioned way, it is perfectly safe if processed using modern methods. If you are unfamiliar with these techniques, please go to http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_home.html for the current information.

    Recipe #90598

    A fermented pickle from the Mississippi Valley chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947.

    Recipe #227977

    A sweetly delicious preserve from the Mississippi Valley chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947. While this recipe is written in an old-fashioned way, it is perfectly safe if processed using modern methods. If you are unfamiliar with these techniques, please go to http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_home.html for the current information.

    Recipe #227978

    4 Reviews |  By Molly53

    An easy, delicious green bean pickle. From the Mississippi Valley Chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947. While this recipe is written in an old-fashioned way, it is perfectly safe if processed using modern methods. If you are unfamiliar with these techniques, please go to http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_home.html for the current information.

    Recipe #227987

    Filled with flavor, from the Mississippi Valley Chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947. While this recipe is written in an old-fashioned way, it is perfectly safe if processed using modern methods. If you are unfamiliar with these techniques, please go to http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_home.html for the current information.

    Recipe #228023

    A great way to use up the end-of-summer bounty of garden produce. Nowadays, a quick pulse of the food processor makes rapid work of the vegetables. From the Mississippi Valley chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947. While this recipe is written in an old-fashioned way, it is perfectly safe if processed using modern methods. If you are unfamiliar with these techniques, please go to http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_home.html for the current information.

    Recipe #228025

    These jade green gems beautifully garnish roast lamb. The color and flavor could easily be changed using red food coloring and cinnamon extract to garnish other dishes. From the Mississippi Valley chapter of Midwestern Recipes, The United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Institute of Chicago, 1947.

    Recipe #144341

    1 Reviews |  By Molly53

    A traditional side for lamb, but would also be very good as a glaze for chocolate cake or to fill chocolate thumbprint cookies. From the Mississippi Valley chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947.

    Recipe #328249

    1 Reviews |  By Molly53

    "Rhubarb is much better in pies Sweet and sour, with strawberry complies It's good as gooseberry And tasty as cherry Please, have a slice -- do not be shy!" Try this favorite with a scoop of good vanilla ice cream! From the Wisconsin Dutch chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947.

    Recipe #332304

    A highly flavored, delicious baked apple. From the Mississippi Valley chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947.

    Recipe #227989

    An honey wine recipe utilizing walnut leaves. From the Mississippi Valley chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947. Three month standing time not included in preparation time.

    Recipe #228222

    1 Reviews |  By Molly53

    A delicious beverage from the Mississippi Valley chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947.

    Recipe #228223

    A sweet little pleaser from the Mississippi Valley chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947. Use blackberry juice as an alternative, if you wish.

    Recipe #228224

    « Previous 1 2 3 4 . . . 7 8 9 Next »
    Displaying up to 20 pages of results. To see all results, or register.
    Advertisement

    Free Weekly Newsletter

    Get the latest recipes and tips delivered right to your inbox.

    Your e-mail is safe. Privacy Policy
    Advertisement

    Over 475,000 Recipes

    Food.com Network of Sites