Recipe Sifter

X
  • Start Here
    • Course
    • Main Ingredient
    • Cuisine
    • Preparation
    • Occasion
    • Diet
    • Nutrition
1

Select () or exclude () categories to narrow your recipe search.

2

As you select categories, the number of matching recipes will update.

Make some selections to begin narrowing your results.
  • Calories
  • Amount per serving
    1. Total Fat
    2. Saturated Fat
    3. Polyunsat. Fat
    4. Monounsat. Fat
    5. Trans Fat
  • Cholesterol
  • Sodium
  • Potassium
  • Total Carbohydrates
    1. Dietary Fiber
    2. Sugars
  • Protein
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin B6
  • Vitamin B12
  • Vitamin C
  • Calcium
  • Iron
  • Vitamin E
  • Magnesium
  • Alcohol
  • Caffeine
  • Find exactly what you're looking for with the web's most powerful recipe filtering tool.

    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / From-Scratch Creole Cooking
    Lost? Site Map
    food image

    117 recipes in

    From-Scratch Creole Cooking

    Louisiana Creole cuisine is a style of cooking originating in Louisiana (centered on the Greater New Orleans area) that blends French, Spanish, French Caribbean, African, Italian and American influences.
    « Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 Next »
    Displaying up to 20 pages of results. To see all results, or register.

    The nutria (also called ragondin) is a fur bearing herbivore native to South America that was first introduced into the wilds of Louisiana in the late 1930s, when animals were intentionally and/or accidentally released from fur farms. Nutria meat is a very lean red meat quite similar to rabbit meat and tastes like dark turkey meat. If you do not hunt, frozen nutria meat is available year round, and can be shipped nationwide.

    Recipe #416470

    The nutria (also called ragondin) is a fur bearing herbivore native to South America that was first introduced into the wilds of Louisiana in the late 1930s, when animals were intentionally and/or accidentally released from fur farms. Nutria meat is a very lean red meat quite similar to rabbit meat and tastes like dark turkey meat. If you do not hunt, frozen nutria meat is available year round, and can be shipped nationwide.

    Recipe #416472

    The nutria (also called ragondin) is a fur bearing herbivore native to South America that was first introduced into the wilds of Louisiana in the late 1930s, when animals were intentionally and/or accidentally released from fur farms. Nutria meat is a very lean red meat quite similar to rabbit meat and tastes like dark turkey meat. If you do not hunt, frozen nutria meat is available year round, and can be shipped nationwide. Recipe by: Mattie Harris

    Recipe #416473

    The nutria (also called ragondin) is a fur bearing herbivore native to South America that was first introduced into the wilds of Louisiana in the late 1930s, when animals were intentionally and/or accidentally released from fur farms. Nutria meat is a very lean red meat quite similar to rabbit meat and tastes like dark turkey meat. If you do not hunt, frozen nutria meat is available year round, and can be shipped nationwide. To stuff the casings, you will need a meat grinder with a sausage horn attachment. If you don't have such a device, use the mixture to make fried patties by shaping 1/4 cup of filling into a 1/2 inch thick patty and frying in hot oil until golden brown on both sides. Recipe by: Chef Enola Prudhomme

    Recipe #416474

    The nutria (also called ragondin) is a fur bearing herbivore native to South America that was first introduced into the wilds of Louisiana in the late 1930s, when animals were intentionally and/or accidentally released from fur farms. Nutria meat is a very lean red meat quite similar to rabbit meat and tastes like dark turkey meat. If you do not hunt, frozen nutria meat is available year round, and can be shipped nationwide. Recipe by Brian Berry from Hotel Acadiana's Bayou Bistro.

    Recipe #416476

    1 Reviews |  By Molly53

    The nutria (also called ragondin) is a fur bearing herbivore native to South America that was first introduced into the wilds of Louisiana in the late 1930s, when animals were intentionally and/or accidentally released from fur farms. Nutria meat is a very lean red meat quite similar to rabbit meat and tastes like dark turkey meat. If you do not hunt, frozen nutria meat is available year round, and can be shipped nationwide. Serve over hot cooked rice, pasta or cream potatoes. From nutria.com.

    Recipe #418543

    The nutria (also called ragondin) is a fur bearing herbivore native to South America that was first introduced into the wilds of Louisiana in the late 1930s, when animals were intentionally and/or accidentally released from fur farms. Nutria meat is a very lean red meat quite similar to rabbit meat and tastes like dark turkey meat. If you do not hunt, frozen nutria meat is available year round, and can be shipped nationwide. This recipe freezes well. Courtesy of the state of Louisiana.

    Recipe #421475

    Marzipan, cover cakes with it, make biscuits with it (roll it up in cookie dough), make animals with it, eat it with a spoon. Save any left over in the fridge in a glass bowl covered with cling film.

    Recipe #14149

    1 Reviews |  By Molly53

    Yummy and sweet, these are a traditional candy of the deep South. People in the know prounounce this "praw-LEEN". For best results, use a candy thermometer. Cooking time approximate. From the Creole chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947.

    Recipe #238299

    This treat has roots in the Middle East. If desired, use all raisins instead of mixed fruits or peanuts for the walnuts. From the Creole chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947.

    Recipe #238356

    A romantic, turn of the century recipe from the Creole chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947. While this recipe is written in an old-fashioned way, it is perfectly safe if processed using modern methods. If you are unfamiliar with these techniques, please go to http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_home.html for the current information.

    Recipe #241834

    A romantic preserve from the deep South. From the Creole chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947. Cooking time approximate. While this recipe is written in an old-fashioned way, it is perfectly safe if processed using modern methods. If you are unfamiliar with these techniques, please go to http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_home.html for the current information.

    Recipe #241866

    1 Reviews |  By Molly53

    A hearty bean dish from the Creole chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947.

    Recipe #242498

    1 Reviews |  By Molly53

    Louisiana is famous for it's seafood. Full-flavored and delicious, this dish is from the Creole chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947.

    Recipe #246130

    1 Reviews |  By Molly53

    Beautiful berries in heavenly clouds, this would be equally as good with other berries. From the Creole chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947.

    Recipe #238953

    Sweet summer preserved in a jar. Clingstone peaches work really well with this recipe. Aging improves flavor. From the Creole chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947

    Recipe #238957

    This is just lovely served over vanilla ice cream or pound cake. This gets better the longer it sits and steeping time is not included in preparation time. It's also useful as a preserve. From the Creole chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947.

    Recipe #239084

    Delicious served with cream cheese and crackers. From the Creole chapter of the United States Regional Cookbook, Culinary Arts Institute of Chicago, 1947.

    Recipe #241835

    3 Reviews |  By Molly53

    A lovely variation of Cafe Mocha from the River Road Recipes cookbook of the Junior League of Baton Rouge, Louisiana

    Recipe #80486

    A real New Orleans eye opener from the famous Brennan's.

    Recipe #179218

    « Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 Next »
    Displaying up to 20 pages of results. To see all results, or register.
    Advertisement

    Looking For More?

    pic of Indian Lamb Curry

    Indian Lamb Curry

    By Sue Lau

    41 Reviews

    pic of Gluten Free - Thin Pizza Crust

    Gluten Free - Thin Pizza Crust

    By ukichix

    14 Reviews

    More cookbooks from Molly53:

    Free Weekly Newsletter

    Get the latest recipes and tips delivered right to your inbox.

    Your e-mail is safe. Privacy Policy
    Advertisement

    Over 475,000 Recipes

    Food.com Network of Sites