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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / D's French Tart's Recipes
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    14 recipes in

    D's French Tart's Recipes

    {Photo by Chef French Tart of Chef French Tart's Bastille Burger - Bearnaise, Blue Cheese and Red Onion Burgers} I think that FT is an excellent cook and admire her a lot!

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    Originally made with just bacon. Now, it usually contains onions and Gruyere cheese. A small wedge with a simple fruit salad and/or green salad makes a lovely lunch or light dinner.

    Recipe #122988

    A bit of a twist on the usual sweet Danish pastries, these are my savoury Danish pastries using Danish Bacon and Danish Blue cheese - a very tasty combination! Use ready made puff pastry for speed and ease. Serve these for brunch or a light lunch with salads and pickles. These are also great to take on a picnic.

    Recipe #235060

    An easy and very tasty oven baked Swedish pancake with bacon - perfect for a busy weekend brunch or breakfast. Try to use high quality smoked bacon for a better flavour and taste.

    Recipe #235170

    A traditional style baguette de Campagne - rustic French bread, which is easy to make and has lots of body - it is NOT like the usual light, supermarket produced baguettes of today. This bread can be started off in a bread machine if you wish. Marianne is the national symbol of France; she personifies Liberty, Reason & the Triumph of the Republic. She appears on stamps, government forms, town halls, law courts and the former French franc coins & banknotes; she even appears on high quality Label Rouge Baguettes and Pain!! Therefore, I have called this homemade French Bread/Baguette recipe after her.....it seems only right and proper!

    Recipe #235909

    A home-made burger with three of my favourite French elements included in the ingredients, Bearnaise sauce, French blue cheese and sliced red onions! I made these for a quick lunch on Bastille Day - 14th July, hence the name! I used our excellent local Charolaise beef, a salt marsh beef which is superb, with a good fat to muscle ratio, and a slight tang of herbs and salt. If you want to cut down on the carbs, just have this burger "Naked" without the bun! Likewise for low fat - omit the Bearnaise sauce and chop some fresh tarragon up and mix it with the minced/ground beef. I am not a great lover of commercial burgers, but I do like home-made burgers - and these are now a firm favourite with all my family & friends! This recipe is for 2 people - just increase the ingredients for more people.

    Recipe #240455

    This is my adaptation of the much loved and famous recipe created by Constance Spry for the Queen's Coronation lunch in 1953. I make this regularly for picnics and buffets; it is also amazing as a sandwich filler. In 1953, curry powder would have been used - but I find that curry paste works better. Use any type of poached or cooked chicken - I usually cook a couple of chicken breasts just for this recipe, however, a whole cooked chicken works very well; don't forget to remove the skin and check for bones first. This recipe is based on the Coronation Chicken recipe in: The Constance Spry Cookery Book by Constance Spry & Rosemary Hulme (1956).

    Recipe #245746

    The news is out - scientists at my old university, (Leeds University in West Yorkshire) have discovered the PERFECT way to make a "Bacon Butty", that quintessential British sandwich, and they have devised a mathematical formula for it!! The bacon butty is one of my FAVOURITE sandwiches of all times.......especially when doused in HP Sauce or Worcestershire Sauce! Here is my method - it's hardly a recipe, more of an idea and an assembly job! I have posted their mathematical formula at the end of the recipe - my formula is: Eat your bacon butty whilst it’s still hot and crispy!! Please increase the quantities as needed. I like to use smoked bacon, but any good quality dry cure bacon will be fine.

    Recipe #247495

    This classic French potato gratin dish literally translates as "Potatoes in the Style of the Baker's wife". The story is, that in the past, a French family would prepare these potatoes and then take them to the local boulangerie, the baker, to be cooked in the even heat of his oven, hence the name. Any sort of good quality stock will do, chicken, lamb, beef or vegetable. For a richer taste, a ratio of 50% hot stock and hot milk/cream can be used. If using lamb stock, it is nice to sprinkle the top of the potatoes with fresh Rosemary, and I often add a sprig of thyme to my potatoes when baking them. I have found that melted butter gives a better result than dotting butter, no burned and upturned edges anymore!

    Recipe #248261

    This classic French potato gratin dish is world famous, and rightly so! I am quite happy to have this as a main meal, with just some crusty bread and a large mixed salad on the side. I have heard that this famous dish was created as a way of encouraging the "Dauphin" (the young prince destined to become King Henri II), to eat up his vegetables, hence the name! Maybe - it is certainly just as popular with children, as it is with adults. Try to slice the potatoes as thinly as possible for the best results. A wonderful accompaniment for all sorts of roast meats, stews, casseroles and poultry.

    Recipe #248268

    In the recipe for "Potatoes Anna", I have always been unsure who "Anna" was. I now have the answer.......Browsing through Julia Child's Mastering the Art of French Cooking, Vol. 2; I found this historical note about Pommes Anna: "It was created during the era of Napoleon III and named, as were many culinary triumphs in those days, after one of the grandes cocottes of the period. Whether it was an Anna Deslions, an Anna Judic, or simply Anna Untel, she has also immortalized the special double baking dish itself, la cocotte a pommes Anna, which is still made and which you can still buy at a fancy price". Sounds like a mandatory piece of kitchenware for all dedicated chefs and cooks to me!! This simple recipe is all in the preparation and presentation, and the use of very, very thinly sliced potatoes, that's the key to success. Since the dish is inverted, it is important that the first layer of potatoes be attractively arranged. Select perfect slices, and overlap them carefully. It is best cooked in a copper or cast iron omelette pan. If you don't have an "omelette pan" which is ovenproof, use a deep pie plate. Keep in mind the final shape makes the presentation. A watercress or parsley garnish adds colour. Serve warm and cut into wedges, like a cake or quiche.

    Recipe #248469

    This is such a wonderful and traditional English recipe for Hallowe'en - All Hallow's Eve! It was a dish traditionally served to unmarried guests with a ring hidden inside. Whoever found the ring would be the next one to be married! This delicious mashed potato has nine ingredients in it - hence its name. Serve it as a supper dish by itself, or as an accompaniment to bangers/sausages, for a comforting Autumn supper dish! For those whom may be interested, a brief history on the origins of Hallowe'en: In ancient Britain this date was the pre-Christian eve of the New Year and Celtic Harvest Festival, when the souls of the dead were thought to revisit their homes to eat and drink. People left refreshments on the table and unlocked their doors before retiring for the night, then bells were rung, fires lit to guide the returning souls back to earth and animals were brought in for the winter. After Hallowe'en became a Christian festival, supernatural associations continued to thrive. It was believed that witches were abroad and that it was possible for certain people to perform magic and summon up spirits. Hallowe'en was once a time for making mischief - many parts of England still recognise this date as Mischief Night - when children would knock on doors demanding a treat (Trick or Treat) and people would disguise themselves as witches, ghosts, kelpies and spunkies, in order to obtain food and money from nervous householders. In certain parts of England youths still play pranks on their neighbours by hiding garden ornaments, whitewashing walls and ringing doorbells in the dead of night.

    Recipe #254835

    A delectable starter or luncheon dish that I devised for the Auberge. King prawns, in their shells or with the tails still intact - pan fried in a warm dressing of lemon, lime and lovage with Pineau des Charentes and crème fraiche! Convinced? Here is the recipe! Serve with Mesclun or mixed salad leaves of your choice and lots of crusty bread for mopping up those juices! In the event you cannot get hold of Pineau des Charentes, use Port of Fino Sherry instead.

    Recipe #254971

    1 Reviews |  By Bergy

    Fireworks and bonfire potatoes - what a great combo. You can have any variety of toppings for the potatoes try traditional sour cream & chives etc etc Use you imagination go wild!

    Recipe #12099

    These Flower Pot bread loaves or bread rolls will certainly be a point of conversation and no doubt bring gasps of pleasure and admiration when you serve them! Moreover, they are so easy to make especially if you start your dough off in a bread machine. Bread was originally baked in terracotta or clay pots, so these are not so different from old fashioned bread made many years ago. You must make sure your flower pots are seasoned before you bake in them, but once they are seasoned they are ready to be used over and over again. I have added a list of suggested extras, and I always like to sprinkle mixed seeds on top of these - they almost look like seeds that have been sown in the flower pots! I have listed ingredients for basic white bread here, but you can add wholewheat, granary or rye flour if you would like a variation. I am sorry, but I have to say it, these flower pot loaves or rolls should turn out "Blooming Marvellous"! Had to be said! Have fun. NB: Strong white flour is the British culinary term for bread flour, flour that is used in breadmaking with a high gluten content. All purpose flour is NOT strong bread flour and will NOT give the desired results in this bread recipe. It NEVER crossed my mind that anyone would think that old flower pots are used in this recipe!! LOL! PLEASE use new plant pots and season them before baking the bread in them, as stated in the recipe..........I hope that helps those of you who may have been "lost in translation"!)

    Recipe #256869


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