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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / English/Irish Food
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    47 recipes in

    English/Irish Food

    I hope to get to the UK one day soon, in the meantime there,s Gordon & Jamie.
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    Comfort food at its best! A traditional recipe handed down to me by my Mum and her Mum before her......it was my favourite after school tea time meal & is still a firm family favourite even now! I serve mine with lashings of onion gravy and piles of fluffy & buttery mashed potatoes. I used to make mini versions of this recipe for my daughter when she was little - they make great appetizers before a Halloween/Bonfire night supper or a children's Party! For the mini version, just use a small cake/pie tins or a small muffin tray and split your sausages into quarters OR use cocktail sausages. The following recipe is for 4 people served with potatoes & gravy - the recipe can easily be doubled for more people or if served by itself.

    Recipe #184023

    I was taught how to cook fish and chips by my mum when I was about 12 years old; we were living in Hong Kong at the time and it was my mum's way of treating us to a little bit of home as a treat! My mum had this recipe written down on the back of an old envelope stuck inside her Be-Ro cookbook from 1952 - I never use any other method now! One trick is to make sure that everything is prepared and assembled ready for frying takeoff!!! If you are cooking for two or more people, have your oven on with a lined tray to keep the fish and chips warm. If you really want to be totally authentic, cut up squares of greaseproof paper and sheets of newspaper - place the fish and chips onto the greaseproof paper and then into a sheet of newspaper. All you need now is a pickled onion, salt and MALT VINEGAR! TIPS for CHIPS: I notice one reviewer had difficulty with the chips. Here are a few tips or tricks for chips: Make sure they are DRIED thoroughly. Make sure the fat is VERY hot - 190 degrees C. Certain potatoes are better for chipping, such as King Edwards, Desiree, Majestic, Maris Piper, and Romano. You can soak the chips for an hour before the first frying - it extracts excess starch, which helps in the "crisping" process! Always drain them thoroughly before serving. I hope these tips will help!

    Recipe #183399

    I cannot resist sharing this recipe with you all, if only to try to preserve its delightful name! Nobody appears to know where the name originated from, although it has been suggested that it was an enterprising farmer’s wife, using up her windfall fruit that came up with the quirky name. The jam is thought to originate from Worcestershire, although Gloucestershire also lays claim to it! Nevertheless, this is a wonderful jam which makes full use of three of my favourite Autumn fruits – Apples, Pears and Plums. The jam is a lovely deep rosy pink colour and is delicious not only on bread, toast and scones – but also when used in steamed jam puddings such as Jam Roly-Poly. Do not omit the lemon and ginger – they are the key to the flavour in this lovely jam. The recipe is easily increased or reduced, as long as the ratio of fruit is the same, it works just as well. N.B. It is sometimes seen as Dumpsie Dearie Jam. Please note that I have quoted UK yield - we use pound and half pound jars, which I believe may equate to pint and half pint jars in the States.

    Recipe #253728

    Freshly boiled eggs are encased in a herb flavoured sausage “jacket” and are then deep-fried until golden and crisp, delicious! Contrary to popular belief, Scotch eggs are not Scottish, and they were actually invented by the famous London department store “Fortnum & Mason” in 1738, where they are still available today. The word "Scotch" is an old English word meaning to chop or mince, and obviously, the eggs are covered with “chopped or minced” pork sausage meat, hence the name Scotch Eggs. They are traditional British picnic food but I also like to serve them as a light lunch or snack, and they make a wonderful addition to the buffet table. These tasty traditional English specialities have had bad press over the years; mainly down to commercial mass production, but if you make them at home with fresh, free-range eggs and the best quality sausage meat, they will taste divine, and they will always be the stars of the picnic hamper or family lunch table! PLEASE use high quality sausage meat or sausages, with at least 70% meat content.Historical Note: Founded in 1707, Fortnum & Mason (F&M) stocks "food fit for a queen". The 300-year-old British department store, famous for its jams, teas, and sauces, provides the Queen with her annual supply of Christmas puddings and holds the "Royal Warrant. NB: You can use quail's eggs with great results too - perfect for an elegant appetiser or starter. (The optional mixed spice is for those who like a spicy meat coating, it is mentioned in some old recipes, but I don't always use it.)

    Recipe #408043

    A simple and easy to whip up apple sponge cake; baked in a tray for easy serving - cut into bars or squares for picnics, school or office lunch boxes & for tea time treats! It is DIVINE served hot with cream,custard or ice cream for a great Autumn/Fall pudding. This type of cake is often called Dorset or Somerset Apple cake, but it is really quite popular in nearly all of the English counties, especially during apple harvest season. I have stipulated Bramley apples, which are English cooking apples - in the absence of these, any tart or sharp "Appley" flavoured or regional "cooking" apples will do.

    Recipe #189493

    The perfect pot of English tea leads to the perfect cup of English tea! I know this is NOT a recipe, but it is amazing how many people do not know how to make a PROPER POT of tea! We always make a pot of tea at home - even if there is only one of us here, we just use a smaller pot! I also prefer loose tea to tea-bags, but we do use good quality tea-bags as well. This is my method for making a perfect pot of tea, and therefore a perfect cuppa. This has been posted due to a request from my daughter, who obviously has FAR more sophisticated tastes as a university student than I did when I was one!! Plus, what can be nicer then baking a cake, inviting a couple of friends over and having a natter with a cuppa? It puts the world to rights! Quantities are listed for a pot of tea for two.....you can increase or decrease the amounts to suit.The following extract is from Mrs Beeton's book of Household Management printed in 1880; here she suggests the method for a "perfect" cup of tea, using loose tea of course and NOT tea bags! "There is very little art in making good tea; if the water is boiling, and there is no sparing of the fragrant leaf, the beverage will almost invariably be good. The old-fashioned plan of allowing a teaspoonful to each person, and one over, is still practised. Warm the teapot with boiling water; let it remain for two or three minutes for the vessel to become thoroughly hot, then pour it away. Put in the tea, pour in from 1/2 to 3/4 pint of boiling water, close the lid, and let it stand for the tea to draw from 5 to 10 minutes; then fill up the pot with water. The tea will be quite spoiled unless made with water that is actually ‘boiling’, as the leaves will not open, and the flavour not be extracted from them; the beverage will consequently be colourless and tasteless,—in fact, nothing but tepid water. Where there is a very large party to make tea for, it is a good plan to have two teapots instead of putting a large quantity of tea into one pot; the tea, besides, will go farther. When the infusion has been once completed, the addition of fresh tea adds very little to the strength; so, when more is required, have the pot emptied of the old leaves, scalded, and fresh tea made in the usual manner."

    Recipe #263420

    Luscious fresh strawberries nestle amongst light sponge cake sandwiched with strawberry jam, which are then covered with creamy custard and topped with clotted cream. Simple! This trifle may be simple but it is the star on any tea-time or dessert table and if you cannot obtain clotted cream, use whipping cream, heavy cream or double cream instead. Madeira is used in place of sherry in this trifle, which gives a mellow flavour to the trifle. This is a recipe that my mum sent to me, from a cutting in a British magazine promoting Devon and Cornwall in the West Country - home of the Cream Tea! If you wish to serve this to children or non-drinkers, substitute the Madeira with fruit juice of your choice. In the summer scatter some pink rose petals over the top for the ultimate and romantic finish! (Prep time includes the chilling and soaking time.)

    Recipe #412075

    A tasty and different way to use some of the Sunday Roast leftovers on Monday! Although I have specified lamb in this recipe, beef would also work very well, it's just that I had roast lamb leftovers when I made these. These rissoles are lightly spiced and tangy - perfect for supper when served with salad, pickles, chutneys and maybe a naan bread or pitta bread to make a sandwich. They are easily made and can be prepared ahead of time and left in the fridge, as they hold their shape better when they have been chilled and are firm. These will also freeze very well; open freeze them before frying on a tray or plate until firm and then pack them into freezer bags or a plastic container. They only need about 6 hours to defrost and then are cooked as instructed below.Use curry powder to taste, I use 2 teaspoons as I like mine quite spicy!

    Recipe #410039

    This very simple dessert is very tasty especially if you have a sweet tooth.

    Recipe #415399

    Juicy British bangers (sausages) with baked beans, fresh eggs, fried bread fingers and tomatoes. Yup! It's bold and brash, but a great brunch idea for those days when half a grapefruit and some cereal just doesn't tick the boxes! I cook this on a griddle - it is easier to fit all the food on at the same time, and if you spray the griddle with oil, it is healthier too. Yes, you can add bacon or potatoes or even mushrooms, but we like this simple combination of bangers, beans, egg and tomatoes with fingers of crispy fried bread. Quantities listed are suggestions for two greedy people; please do adjust the amounts to suit your personal requirements. This sets you up for the day, especially if served with freshly squeezed orange juice and a pot of tea. We are normally too full to have toast, but toast and marmalade would be a great accompaniment if you have room!

    Recipe #415695

    A simple and beautiful syrup that is easy to make and gives amazing results. My front garden is covered in little sweet violets every spring and although I crystallise them or cut them for the spring dinner table, I recently found this old recipe for making violet syrup, which is fabulous. So, I have been busy making Sweet Violet Syrup this year! The syrup is great when added to icings and butter cream for cakes; and is wonderful when used in beverages too. Only a small amount is needed to add to sparkling wine or lemonade for a delectable and elegant drink. I have also added the syrup for flavouring to homemade macaroons, French Macarons. Why not make a homemade violet ice cream, or add this to junkets and blancmanges, the list is endless! NB: Six handfuls are about 3 ounces. A bottle of this makes a great gift for a foodie friend, add a label with serving ideas; one teaspoon is usually enough for most recipes.

    Recipe #416575

    Velvety green flecked soup with creamy yoghurt, crispy bacon and a smattering of paprika makes a comforting light lunch or supper.

    Recipe #239320

    Thickly buttered, these fruity, cinnamon spiced teacakes are brilliant for breakfast or afternoon tea and make a great snack anytime. I used to have them in mid morning break at school!

    Recipe #229021

    A tasty pie that is simple to make and is sure to be popular with the whole family. Serve with baked beans or peas for a mid-week meal. A James Martin recipe.

    Recipe #226259

    Filled with ricotta, these sage and Parma ham-wrapped chicken breasts are just too tasty! Serve with steamed greens and light mashed potatoes or a zesty couscous. Time does not include chilling.

    Recipe #325179

    I'm an Essex girl by birth and an Eastender by heritage, so pie mash and licquor was a childhood treat. You can imagine my horror upon moving to Kent to find that no one outside of London has even heard of the dish, let alone tasted it. So I languished for years without. Sure, I could just get a meat pie and somemash, but normal meat pies are not the same, and the licqour is just impossible. Fortunately, through much experimenting my Mum and I now have a suitable substitute that tastes as good (or bad!) as the real thing!

    Recipe #410474

    Salmon fillets marinated in Irish whiskey and honey have a glazed look as well as a superb taste and texture. Irish whiskey has a slightly peppery taste. A delicious combination! From Food and Drink. Prep time includes marinating time.

    Recipe #169936

    From "Jamie at Home" episode JH0111 "Pickles and Preserves." Use Recipe #321653 for the "chili pepper jam" to do it really right.

    Recipe #321658

    19 Reviews |  By AHales

    I've been told by a number of Scottish friends that the Udny Arms (in Aberdeenshire, Scotland) has THE best sticky toffee pudding. Thankfully they've made it available on the web! I've had a number of sticky toffee puddings since living in Scotland, but this one is by far the best. It is also very easy to make! (Recipe info from: Recipe collected by Bernie Jurasek from the Udny Arms Hotel in Scotland and shared with Pat Busst circa 1986. Typed by Jack Busst, Calgary, Alberta. 94/02/27 Jack Busst c/o THE MESSHALL, 1:134/73)

    Recipe #113993

    2 Reviews |  By Bergy

    This is often call Tea Brack because of the soaking of the raisins and currents in tea. The original Brack had only Barm ( a mixture of hops, malt), milk and flour and was made for New Years festivities where pieces of baked loaf would be thrown at the back of the house door to ward off poverty in the coming year. It is between a loaf and a bread in texture. The preparation time does not include the soaking overnight of the raisins & currents

    Recipe #20918

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