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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / Desserts
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    53 recipes in

    Desserts

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    Pumpkin and other winter squashes are already lightly sweet. Roasted, pureed and cooked down with spices, they make a delicious sweet spread, reminiscent of pumpkin pie, but lighter. Adapted from http://bit.ly/18GjP1b at Food52.

    Recipe #509564

    A simple peanut butter fudge. No thermometers needed, just a timer. The original recipe called for 2 cups of light brown sugar; I didn't have any, so I used part dark brown and part white. Do NOT try to use "natural," "organic," unsweetened or salt-free peanut butter for this, it will fail. If you like sweet-salty things (as I do), use salted peanuts on top; if you don't, unsalted will work fine. Adapted from CHOW - http://bit.ly/19a9OLj

    Recipe #501857

    2 Reviews |  By KelBel

    I Love fried cheesecake when I go to restaurants, okay, I love fried anything! I have always wanted an easy way to make it, and here it is. Recipe courtesy Guy Fieri from Guy's Big Bite on foodnetwork.com

    Recipe #311720

    2 Reviews |  By bri765

    This recipe is slightly altered from one I found on the internet. My son and I love it, but try to restrict yourself from eating it daily!

    Recipe #109921

    A simple and tasty breakfast/brunch treat. This is an adopted recipe from the RecipeZaar account, and I am delighted to be the new owner of such a winning recipe. If you would like the inside of the finished dish to be a little less "egg-y" then cut the number of eggs down to 3, and many many reviewers also found that just 3 Tablespoons of butter worked better for them. Either way they did it, they all agreed that the taste was great. Enjoy!

    Recipe #45609

    A delicious summer twist on Apple Crisp. Any type of berries may be used. We love this served with milk, ice cream or whipped cream!

    Recipe #122412

    This is very easy and delicious. It is made in the microwave. When I make it, it cooks for 5 minutes total, stirring after each minute. This recipe is from All Recipes.

    Recipe #274524

    These pavlova meringues (whipped with vinegar for lightness and cornstarch for stability) are topped with an orange custard. Adapted from a recipe by Maria del Mar Sacassa at Serious Eats. http://bit.ly/myUubD

    Recipe #458836

    A rich bread pudding with the flavors of Thai coffee. Copied from a recipe by Maria del Mar Sacasa at Serious Eats. http://bit.ly/kUhaDu

    Recipe #457737

    This cheesecake is only lightly sweet, and loaded with breakfast-y ingredients like orange juice and oats. It could, of course, be served for dessert, but why not make it for breakfast? Originally in _River Cottage Every Day_ by Hugh Fearnly-Whittingstall, reposted at Serious Eats by Caroline Russock. http://bit.ly/hl2gHq

    Recipe #453518

    About half as sweet and slightly chunky, this is Nutella for grownups. Use the best quality cocoa powder you can find; Valhrona is excellent. Adapted from a recipe by Lucy Baker at Serious Eats. http://bit.ly/gbXilj

    Recipe #443980

    Use recipe #421412 for the candied lemon peel, if you have the time to make it. Adapted from a recipe by David Lebovitz, as reprinted at Serious Eats by Caroline Russock. http://bit.ly/b7TJG1

    Recipe #421413

    Adapted from My Bread by Jim Lahey (of the recipe #194745 fame) as posted by Caroline Russock at Serious Eats. http://bit.ly/cB6lKZ

    Recipe #418722

    If you like your hot fudge a little more decadent, use all semi-sweet instead of the milk chocolate. Natural cocoa powder can be used, but will change the flavor somewhat. A simple recipe like this demands the best quality ingredients you can afford. Recipe by Liz Gutman of Liddabit Sweets in Brooklyn NY, as posted at Serious Eats. http://bit.ly/aL4L6X

    Recipe #415275

    This beignet recipe is a little different, as it uses milk instead of water. Adapted from John Besh's _My New Orleans_, as posted at Serious Eats by Caroline Russock. http://bit.ly/ciB1u8

    Recipe #415210

    Adapted from a recipe in _Make it Fast, Cook it Slow_ by Stephanie O'Dea.

    Recipe #408553

    Surprisingly, this works. Perfect when you need just a little something for one or two. Adapted from a recipe posted at The Kitch'n. http://bit.ly/OsFMa

    Recipe #388669

    This is an elegant dessert that is incredibly easy to make. No eggs, no baking, just chill time.

    Recipe #115192

    Some say it was during the 16th century that the famous Medici family invented zabaglione. Others credit Giovan Paolo Baglioni, a fierce Italian nobleman turned warlord who, during the late 15th century, fed his troops a "soup" made of eggs, wild honey and wine. Still others credit the pastry cooks of Turin for creating this delicious mixture of creamed egg yolks, sugar and Marsala. Here the word zabaglione is believed to have been named after a local parish priest, San Pasquale Bayon, who was renowned for his culinary abilities. Regardless of its exact origin, zabaglione's roots are planted in Italian food history. Zabaglione evolved as a delicacy that eventually became popular in France, where it is known as sabayon. Zabaglione or sabayon is a delicate sauce of foamed egg yolks, sugar, and wine. (Marsala is traditional in the Italian version, and Champagne or dry white wine is preferred in the French version.) The yolks are whipped vigorously as they cook over simmering water until a dense, thick foam develops. Whipping allows the incorporation of air, which creates a foam. The following recipe for Zabaglione with Fresh Berries has been adapted from The Culinary Institute of America's Baking and Pastry, Mastering the Art and Craft.Note: If desired, whip 6 fl oz of heavy cream to medium peaks and fold into cooled zabaglione.

    Recipe #134806

    I adopted this recipe after its original poster, Mean Chef (IHHDRO), departed the site. I can't *wait* to try this. Mean posted it on posted May 18, 2002.

    Recipe #28736

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