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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / Delectable Veggie Desserts, Cakes and Bakes
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    Delectable Veggie Desserts, Cakes and Bakes

    A selection of delectable desserts, cakes and bakes for the Vegetarian recipe swap in the Vegetarian forum.............I hope you find something to tickle your tastebuds! FT
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    This is probably one of the lightest and most mouth-watering puddings ever invented. This delightful old fashioned British "Pud" consists of layers of baked custard, raspberry jam and is finished with clouds of light, fluffy meringue - truly a Queen in the pudding world. It is a quintessential Nursery dessert, something that Nanny would rustle up for her young charges in the nursery. My mum would often make this for Sunday high tea, and we all loved it. I often use brioche crumbs for a richer custard base, but any white bread crumbs will be fine. There are numerous recipes for this classic dessert; this recipe is by James Martin, one of my favourite British chefs.

    Recipe #421542

    A fabulous and very old British recipe - whole fresh lemons are encased in a light suet pastry case which is then steamed to make the most delicious self-saucing dessert. This is a classic British pudding which is easy to make and a tasty and tangy way to end a rich meal, such a Sunday lunch. What's in a name? Made of a suet pastry which encases the whole lemons, with butter and sugar, after lengthy steaming they all melt together to make the pond, hence the name! Historical note about Sussex Pond Pudding: Suet was particularly popular as an ingredient in the southern half of England, and there are suggestions that the women of Sussex were especially adept at making use of it. Westham, Chailey, Lancing and Horsham all have associations with the pudding, but doubtless a number of other towns and villages in the county will claim it as their own. In days gone by the pudding was more often made by gently simmering the pudding in a clout or cloth, and some believe that this method continued longer in Sussex than elsewhere in the country. Sussex Pond Pudding consists of suet pastry formed in a pudding basin. Inside the pastry case a filling made of equal quantities of brown sugar and butter and 1 or 2 whole lemons scrubbed, and then pricked all over. The pastry lid seals the goodness inside, and the whole pudding is steamed at length. The lengthy steaming is required to work the magic inside the pastry: the juices of the lemon, mix with the melted butter and the brown sugar, creating a rich but sharp sauce that should gush from the pudding when it is cut into at table. ‘Pond’, appears to refer to the brown liquid that surrounds the pudding on its plate. Older sources indicate another possibility, that ‘pond’ was a corruption of the ‘pound’ of sauce that was produced from the pudding. (Recipe from Delicious magazine and historical notes from The Pudding Club.)

    Recipe #421544

    This is SUCH a wonderful old recipe! Fresh butter is mixed with floral scented waters, such as rose water or orange blossom water and is delicious as an alternative to clotted cream, especially when spread on freshly made scones. It is also wonderful with all types of griddle cakes, crumpets and traditional tea cakes and breads. This floral butter dates back to the 18th Century and is featured in Mrs Beeton's Book of Household Management, as well as numerous other historical cookbooks. This recipe adapts well to modern cooking - and would make a stunning feature at any Victorian style Ladies' afternoon tea party or even a little girl's birthday party. Serve this with pancakes for breakfast or brunch, the possibilities are endless!

    Recipe #416574

    A simple and beautiful syrup that is easy to make and gives amazing results. My front garden is covered in little sweet violets every spring and although I crystallise them or cut them for the spring dinner table, I recently found this old recipe for making violet syrup, which is fabulous. So, I have been busy making Sweet Violet Syrup this year! The syrup is great when added to icings and butter cream for cakes; and is wonderful when used in beverages too. Only a small amount is needed to add to sparkling wine or lemonade for a delectable and elegant drink. I have also added the syrup for flavouring to homemade macaroons, French Macarons. Why not make a homemade violet ice cream, or add this to junkets and blancmanges, the list is endless! NB: Six handfuls are about 3 ounces. A bottle of this makes a great gift for a foodie friend, add a label with serving ideas; one teaspoon is usually enough for most recipes.

    Recipe #416575

    What can be nicer then inviting friends and family over for an old fashioned afternoon tea. Homemade bread, sandwiches, cakes, biscuits (cookies) and these delightful rose scented coconut macaroons. These are not the same as the little piped, multi-coloured and flavoured macaroons that you find in France; these are rustic and yet elegant little coconut mounds or pyramids, real old fashioned biscuit type cakes. As well as being delicious, these are also easy to make. If you would like to add a little food colouring to make them a pale pink, that would make them look so pretty! BUT, be warned, do add the colouring carefully, many a pale rose coloured biscuit (cookie) has ended up a bright puce colour! Recipe from Francis Bissell.

    Recipe #416578

    Yorkshire Tea is a black tea blend produced by Taylors of Harrogate, one of the few remaining family tea and coffee merchants in the UK. The company was founded in 1886 by Yorkshire tea merchant Charles Taylor. Needless to say I drink Yorkshire tea at home in France, I bring boxes and boxes of it back from the UK when I travel there! The Yorkshire Tea Loaf was produced by Taylors as a way of using their Yorkshire tea to expand their range. It involves using the choicest fruits which are infused overnight with the tea. This is my take on their famous tea loaf; moist tea infused fruits really make this loaf something special and it is sublime when served with a traditional English cuppa. Serve this tea loaf in thick slices just as it is - although you could also serve it with butter or with a slab of Wensleydale cheese for that authentic Yorkshire experience. (This is an adapted version of the recipe that is posted on the Yorkshire tea website.)

    Recipe #414946

    A wonderful sticky, sugar topped sweet bread that is flavoured with orange blossom water. Fouace is a very old traditional bread, the word originally referred to the oven in which bread has been cooked since ancient times, from the Latin word "focus" or hearth. This orange blossom scented bread is traditionally shaped in to a wreath or an oval and is from the Albi region in the South of France near Toulouse. As the bread bakes slowly, it spreads out as it rises, giving a very distinctive shape. It is served very hot and, depending on the version, may be topped with white beans, rillettes, salted butter or goat's cheese; however, I prefer this recipe served hot, spread with butter and a dollop of apricot conserve. (Recipe from the Gourmet Food site.)

    Recipe #414954

    Luscious fresh strawberries nestle amongst light sponge cake sandwiched with strawberry jam, which are then covered with creamy custard and topped with clotted cream. Simple! This trifle may be simple but it is the star on any tea-time or dessert table and if you cannot obtain clotted cream, use whipping cream, heavy cream or double cream instead. Madeira is used in place of sherry in this trifle, which gives a mellow flavour to the trifle. This is a recipe that my mum sent to me, from a cutting in a British magazine promoting Devon and Cornwall in the West Country - home of the Cream Tea! If you wish to serve this to children or non-drinkers, substitute the Madeira with fruit juice of your choice. In the summer scatter some pink rose petals over the top for the ultimate and romantic finish! (Prep time includes the chilling and soaking time.)

    Recipe #412075

    A French classic and one that I will me making myself from now on, having just paid a small fortune for a tiny, if delicious loaf from my local boulangerie! This is a cross between sticky ginger parkin and a gingerbread cake or a tea loaf. It is not as moist as parkin or gingerbread, but it is extremely good when spread with butter or even better, when toasted.......divine! It is also surprisingly good when served with cheese. Another idea that I discovered in a local café, is to serve it warm with a dollop of crème fraiche and a little bunch of fresh berries on top, a perfect dessert for an elegant dinner party! This improves with keeping and makes a wonderful gift for a foodie friend or hostess – wrap in cellophane and attach a ribbon with serving suggestions. If you cannot source Quatre Épices, I have a recipe on zaar to make it at home! Recipe #283280

    Recipe #412076

    Delightful light and lemony glazed scones with just a hint of spice! These are even more delicious when split and spread with lemon curd - and maybe a dollop of cream for good measure! These would be wonderful when served for afternoon tea, or make a batch up for a spring picnic. This recipe was on a set of recipe cards that a kind friend sent to me from the States, and I adapted them slightly to my own taste. If you are unable to source mixed spice, I have a recipe for mixed spice on zaar: Recipe #266688

    Recipe #413051

    Make your own brandy butter to smother over delicious, homemade Christmas Figgy or Plum pudding, and in only 5 minutes with this easy recipe,..........no Christmas table would be without this "naughty but nice" accompaniment! This is also wonderful when served with hot mince pies......prise open the pastry lids and dollop some brandy butter inside, preferably when they are warm, so the brandy butter runs through the pies! This makes a great gift - pack the brand butter into an attractive pot and add serving instructions. .

    Recipe #404338

    A wonderful brunch recipe for the morning after or when you need an early boost for a busy day ahead; although this is super healthy and refreshing, I have also served this as the dessert dish for a buffet, BUT with champagne as the liquid instead of orange juice! (Just another idea for dressing this fresh fruit salad up with frills!) This is not only healthy, but it is SO festive and colourful - my photo shows the one I made this Boxing Day (26th December), I usually add kiwi fruit too, but we had run out of them.......oooops! My quantities listed here make enough for 6 to 8 people, but this can be increased as well as reduced to suit personal requirements. I normally serve this with crème fraiche or vanilla yoghurt, but it’s also wonderful when served “naked”, the salad that is, not me! The fruits I have suggested are rich in vitamins and antioxidants for a quick mental boost, as well as a rapid detox to aid recovery after a heavy night or after indulging in rich food, but please do adapt this to your own seasonal and local produce if you wish.

    Recipe #404993

    A trip down Memory Lane! This is my mum's recipe for Coconut Ice, little coconut squares which are coloured pink and white, and used to be popular in old-fashioned British sweet (candy) shops. My mum used to make trays and trays of these for our Church fêtes, as well as for Christmas and for gifts. These lovely little coconut morsels are very popular in Scotland where I think my mum's recipe originated – either from my Scottish grandmother or an auntie. These are great fun to make with the children, as they are easy as well as being "no-cook". If you plan to make them for gifts or to sell, pack them into attractive cellophane bags, glass jars or boxes and add a pretty ribbon as well as a label of ingredients and storage details. This recipe is part of my Old Fashioned Sweet Shop collection of recipes, sweets, candies, fudges, sugar plums and chocolates!

    Recipe #401462

    This is a really easy ice cream to whip up and one that I make every Christmas to go with the Christmas pudding and with my annual Rumtopf or Brandied Cherries and Apricots. You can make it in an ice cream maker if you have one, but as it is a non-custard base ice cream, it works just as well without an ice cream maker. It lasts for one month in the freezer and is a great addition to the summer dining table too!

    Recipe #401893

    Gorgeous spiced pumpkin scones with honey butter - what a treat for the tea-time table during autumn and winter. I have made these twice now and love the combination of the honey butter with the scones, although they are also delicious with plain unsalted butter. This recipe came from an Australian "Olive" magazine that was sent to me, apparently, Queensland is famous for its blue pumpkins where this recipe originates from - I added the spices as well as the honey butter! A wonderful recipe for the cooler months, but as it uses tinned or frozen pumpkin, these can be made all year around. If you don't want to serve these with the honey butter, just split them whilst warm and spread with normal butter or cream. Mixed spice is a British spice mixture, I have a recipe for this on RZ: Recipe #266688

    Recipe #397407

    Just the job when it is hot and humid, a simple and elegant dessert to finish off a special summer dinner party outside and under the stars! This is also a wonderful accompaniment for fresh summer berries or gently poached fruits. Try to make sure that you give these little syllabubs plenty of time to chill and set before serving. Serve with a squirt of Chantilly cream and some fresh Lemon Verbena leaves as a garnish. Lemon Verbena is a very lemony herb, think of fizzy lemon sherbet (as in Barratt’s Sherbet Dipper) and you will have an idea of the taste!

    Recipe #379754

    I grow many old fashioned and unusual herbs in my garden in France, and although many people know Lemon Balm, Lemon Verbena is not so well known, which is such a shame! For me the flavour is MUCH more lemony and intense than Lemon Balm - think lemon sherbet, and you have a good idea of what to expect! The plant has graceful pointed leaves that are a gorgeous pale green in colour. Just scrunching a leaf in your hand to release the aromas can help fatigue or a headache. This is an ice cream I came up with to refresh and revive even the most jaded of palates – refreshing and with an amazing lemony zing! You should be able to source Lemon Verbena at any good Farmer's Markets - alternatively, make friends with someone who grows it! (Prep time includes the time to infuse the leaves to extract the flavour.)

    Recipe #379780

    A quick and easy home-made honey recipe from the Auberge in South West France! I use lavender honey so much in my cooking, that I thought it was about time I made my own - given that I have about 30 lavender bushes! As well as giving an amazing and subtle flavour to your recipes, it also makes a wonderful gift for a fellow foodie. I plan on making my own lavender honey all the time now, as even in France, it is quite expensive to buy. You can increase the quantities to make more jars - just remember to keep the flower to honey ratio the same.

    Recipe #379821

    Pull up a hammock, select a good book and make a jug of this cooling lemonade to refresh you as you gently sway and wile away the long, hot hours! A simple zingy lemonade syrup that is added to water to dilute and is compulsory for hot, humid days! Lemon Verbena is one of my favourite herbs and is a welcome addition to my walled herb garden here in France. The syrup is also amazing if poured over ice creams and summer berries for a tangy citrus flavour. Add an attractive label and a sprig of lemon verbena leaves for a thoughtful summer gift.

    Recipe #380309

    This is my favourite type of French fruit tart, even more so than apple tart! Our local Patisserie makes a wonderful Tarte aux Abricots, but they are quite expensive and VERY large, much too big for the two of us when we have no B and B guests! So, I have been tinkering in the kitchen again, and have come up with this recipe. You MUST use fresh apricots for this - tinned ones are too soft and too sweet. Plus, I love the slightly tart flavour that the fresh apricots lend to the flavours of this tart. The ground almonds are scattered over the base of the short crust pastry case to stop it becoming soggy during cooking; they also provide a complimentary flavour to the apricots. A classic French tart that will make a delightful ending to any special meal or for afternoon tea. Serve this tart with fresh whipped cream or crème fraiche.

    Recipe #380423

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