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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / Cafe ZMAKK Gypsies: Greek Recipes
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    12 recipes in

    Cafe ZMAKK Gypsies: Greek Recipes


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    This is something I have been making for a while. I finally figured out how to cut down on the brine taste so that I could taste the other ingredients as well. The addition of sugar was the answer.I tried omitting the brine, but then the salad wasn't as moist as I was hoping it would be and the tomato pieces turned mushy after a couple of days. If you are going to be eating the salad in one day, you can probably omit the brines altogether. The ingredients blend really well together and are quite tasty. Make this at least one hour before serving it to allow everything to meld together. To save money, slice the olives yourself. The amounts of the olives, green onions/scallions and tomato are approximate and depends on what size of each ingredient you use. This salad is versatile and will go with many things. The sodium content is probably high in this recipe so you will want to serve it with something that has less salt. Cook time is the refrigeration time. ..

    Recipe #295643

    I first had one of these wonderful sandwiches just after I had moved to Cyprus; I remember sitting in an old, rundown taverna with a chilled Keo beer, whilst gazing out towards the deep blue Mediterranean Sea! Bliss! They are usually made in long, fat finger rolls, similar to hoagies or sub rolls, but you can also make them with pitta bread or other shapes of bread rolls. Halloumi is a traditional Cypriot cheese, which is still made locally by lots of Cypriot ladies - you often see the cheeses "hanging out to dry" in old, but hopefully clean (?) tights or stockings! Halloumi is an extremely good cheese for cooking, it maintains its shape and becomes toasty and slightly salty when fried or grilled. You can buy packs of good quality Cypriot Halloumi cheese in most supermarkets or in a delicatessen. It can last for up to ONE year when bought in a vacuum-sealed pack! Halloumi is the Greek Cypriot name for this cheese, the Turkish Cypriots call it Hellim - it is the same cheese however, and the best cheese is made with 100% sheep’s milk. You will find these sandwiches all over Cyprus in different guises, this is my favourite combination.

    Recipe #307295

    These were without doubt the most popular drink that we served in the restaurant I ran in Cyprus! They are known as the National Drink of Cyprus, and are delicious as well as being very refreshing. We used to make these with the local Cypriot brandy, which is not as strong as normal French brandy or cognac and has a delectable caramel taste to it. We also used the local angostura bitters, known as "Cock Drops", which as you can imagine, brought raised eyebrows and howls of laughter from overseas guests and tourists! A little history behind the cocktail: The Cypriot Brandy Sour style was developed following the introduction of the first blended brandy made on Cyprus, by the Haggipavlu family, in the early 1930s. The cocktail was developed at the Forest Park Hotel, in the hill-resort of Plátres in the beautiful Troodos Mountain range, for the young King Farouk of Egypt, who often stayed at the hotel during his frequent visits to the island. The Brandy Sour was introduced as an alcoholic substitute for iced tea, as a way of disguising the Muslim monarch's preference for Western-style cocktails. The drink subsequently spread to other bars and hotels in the fasionable Platres area, before making its way to the coastal resorts of Limassol, Paphos and Kyrenia, and the capital Nicosia. With increasing numbers of tourists visiting the island in the last thirty years, and the large garrison of British servicemen stationed on the island, the Cypriot Brandy Sour is now known around the world. This is how we used to make them in our restaurant - a trade secet shared!!

    Recipe #307582

    5 Reviews |  By katew

    This is from a Woolworth's Fresh magazine and came from a segment on entertaining on a budget

    Recipe #226242

    3 Reviews |  By katew

    Adapted from a recipe torn from an Australian Womens Weekly - I made one large tart but you could make individual ones if you wished.You could also use a pre made pastry shell.

    Recipe #237034

    2 Reviews |  By katew

    Adapted from Australian Table magazine - an issue from 2004. This is versatile and I have topped it with grated cheese and used diced tomatoes and rocket on occasions- so you can go with what you have in the fridge !! Also I usually double the recipe so there are leftovers for lunches.

    Recipe #257320

    Recipe #306596

    Recipe #304969

    Not for the faint hearted, these SPICY aubergines are stuffed with lentils, making them a wonderful vegetarian main meal or appetiser. You can add minced meat (ground beef) if you wish, but I find that the Puy Lentils used in this dish have quite enough "body" already! These are based on a Turkish recipe called Imam Bayildi - but I have "pepped" them up a bit by adding Cayenne pepper, chili & the lentils! Do not forget the essential finishing touch - the minted cumin yoghurt, it "cuts" through the heat of the cayenne pepper. Serve these with a crispy salad and crusty bread.

    Recipe #218374

    It's fig time here in SW France, and I have been busy making up new fig recipes, as well as making jams, pickles, alcohol steeped figs and chutneys with all our harvest! This was thrown together one Sunday afternoon as a starter for a lazy Al Fresco Sunday lunch - and since then I have had requests for it nearly every day! If you are lucky enough to have a fig tree, try and garnish the individual plates with a couple of washed leaves - it really adds a certain panache to the appearance of the salad! I have made this with Chevre - Goat's Cheese as well as Feta, and it was just as delicious. Amounts given are for a starter for 6 people - and assuming that the figs are medium to large in size; please adjust the quantities if necessary. Toasting the walnuts beforehand is well worth the effort, and if you toast more than is needed, any excess can be stored in an airtight container.

    Recipe #250866

    Source: Pillsbury Bake-Off Contest "Layers of flaky biscuits hold a tempting and traditional honey-nut filling."

    Recipe #278077

    Source: Bon Appétit magazine, February 2008 issue

    Recipe #279943


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