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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / British Recipes
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    British Recipes

    This cookbook contains mostly traditional recipes that I have collected since coming over here to live several years back. Simple recipes prepared with the freshest of ingredients are the essence of English regional cookery. This book brings together a collection of traditional fare from the shires of England.
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    The use of spices and fruit in savoury recipes during the Elizabethan era was very popular, especially with the upper classes and the Royal court. This is based on a genuine Elizabethan recipe, which I have adapted for modern day cooking! I have included potatoes - which made their first appearance in Great Britain during this period, and were a novelty! Serve with steamed greens and assorted root vegetables. N.B. Oven temperatures were not given in my original posting of this recipe, but they have been added now! Also, the finely chopped herbs added at the end, gives the casserole a very "fresh" herby taste and a lovely colour - they MUST be very finely chopped however, and must NOT include the stalks, just the leaves - with the exception of the parsley.

    Recipe #238144

    "Cattern cakes" are spiced with cinnamon, lightly fruited and flavoured with caraway seeds; they are traditionally made by the English Nottingham lacemakers for the festivities on their special feast day. The recipe goes back to Tudor times, and has changed little over the centuries, although they are sometimes made with yeast dough. Also known as Catherine Cakes (after Catherine of Aragon, whom whilst imprisoned locally at Ampthill, heard of the lacemaker's financial plight, and destroyed all of her lace only to commission some more and give work to the local industry). They are specially prepared for St. Catherine's Day - the patroness of spinners, lace-makers, rope-makers and spinsters - on the 25th November, which is the lacemaker's special day. They are traditionally washed down with Hot Pot - a hot mixture of rum, beer and eggs. I find that I prefer mine with a cup of tea! These delicious little cakes are more like a soft and slightly chewy biscuit or cookie.

    Recipe #266901

    These are the forerunner of modern baked cheesecakes, and this recipe originates from one of the first documented versions of this recipe. Curd cheese was very popular as an ingredient for desserts many hundreds of years ago, and these delightful little tarts have a Royal lineage; the story is that whilst Henry VIII was strolling in the gardens of Hampton Court Palace, he came across a group of ladies in waiting (to his queen, Catherine of Aragon), one of whom was Anne Boleyn - whom subsequently became his second wife; they offered him some of these tarts and he enjoyed them so much, that he named them after the Maids of Honour. I always make these for afternoon tea - they are delightfully light and fragranced with delicate orange flower water or rose water. Use any dried fruits that you have available - I find a mixture of seedless raisins and chopped candied peel works very well.

    Recipe #216860

    Ahhhh... high school memories! One certain Mr. Brown was my maths teacher and had a great sense of humour. Which was just as well. You see, it was during his tenure at Lanark Grammar School that a British baking company (sorry, I've forgotten their name) introduced their delicious malty brown bread which they marketed under the brand name "Hovis" and they launched the product with TV commercials that proclaimed, simply, "Don't say brown - say 'Hovis'". Yep, you guessed it. From that day forth, our beloved teacher was known and addressed as Hovis. So here's a copycat recipe, in his memory.

    Recipe #32232

    A divine and decadent three tiered strawberries and cream gateau, enough to melt any man's heart! There is another recipe for this on Zaar, but this is the recipe that I know and love; this recipe has family connections; my mother has an old black and white photograph, taken in 1920, of my grandparents seated by my grandmother's courting Cake! The tradition is that the cake was baked by the young ladies for their betrothed, one would assume as some sort of culinary test maybe? The tradition was particularly prevalent in the north of England, hence the name of my cake. You can use bruised or very ripe strawberries for use in the filling, I buy mine at the end of the season when there is a glut - reserving the best ones for the top of the cake! The cake is also known as a Betrothal Cake in some parts of Great Britain.

    Recipe #234358

    Oast Cakes were traditionally prepared by casual labourers as a quick but filling snack in the hop gardens of Kent, also known as the Garden of England. The hop pickers prepared the mixture earlier in the day, often with parsnip wine, then shallow fried the balls of dough in lard over the campfire during their afternoon break. Some people believe they taste better when deep fried. However, they are always best when eaten fresh and warm, and shallow frying is fine as well as being healthier!

    Recipe #238806

    My low fat version of these famous English sausages. An Oxford butcher probably created this recipe in the days when every shop sold its own special home-made sausages. These are succulent and meaty, well flavoured with herbs and lemon. They are shaped in the hands before frying, and do not have skins, making them ideal to make if you do not have a sausage skin attachment. If you have a problem using veal, substitute it for beef instead!

    Recipe #230583

    These traditional English sausages are spicy & so much better than the shop bought varieties. If you can get hold of sausage skins or casings, so much the better - but these sausages still taste great without them. They are great for breakfast, brunch, picnics, casseroles or a firm family favourite - "Bangers & Mash"! Try and use local organically produced pork for a superior flavour.They can be frozen before cooking & the mixture can be used for sausagemeat stuffing also.

    Recipe #190045

    A tasty pie that is simple to make and is sure to be popular with the whole family. Serve with baked beans or peas for a mid-week meal. A James Martin recipe.

    Recipe #226259

    This is a real summer treat and a good way of using up slightly bruised or over-ripe strawberries or making just a few go further. It was originally made in the north of England by young girls for their betrotheds, hence the name.

    Recipe #26830

    A very easy & tasty recipe which I first devised for using up the Post-Christmas Stilton Cheese, but now I will actually buy Stilton, when I can, or any other good quality blue cheese in order to make this supper dish! The only requirements are: good blue cheese and good "Country" style bread or home-made bread. I have used Walnut bread, Multi-grain Granary bread, French Baguette & Ciabatta bread in the past for this dish. There are numerous options and additions too - tomatoes go well on top as does a finely sliced spring onion. This recipe is great for a light supper dish with a crispy salad on the side & a good glass of Red wine too. I have also used this recipe for pre-dinner nibbles - you need to stamp out small rounds of bread if you wish to serve them that way.

    Recipe #200953

    This is a recipe that my mum gave me and it makes a very comforting meal on a cold day. I am not certain if you can buy Cumberland sausages in other countries (doubtful!) but if not then go for a thick, heavily seasoned / peppery sausage. What I call Butter Beans I think are called White Lima Beans in the US. I think Worcestershire sauce is widely available but if not use a brown spicy sauce. Lastly, I think cider is referred to as "hard cider" in the US so just to clarify it's the version with alcohol for this recipe! I normally serve with baked potatoes.

    Recipe #179033

    This is an old English recipe from my husband's great nanny. I have made it countless times. It makes any dinner party cozy and you will get lots of raves.Make it ahead of time and reheat in oven and serve with a crisp salad. Any child who likes a crust will love it. Each slice is deep with the filling and it stays together beautifully. It is my family's favorite recipe and I make it all seasons.You might have enough filling for two pies. Note: recipe reflects a change in cook time for filling: 25 min. or until potatoes are tender.

    Recipe #117326

    Roast potatoes are a weekly institution in most British families and households. When it's time for that Sunday lunch, it's time for roast potatoes. For the very best results it's important to use the right potato. Almost any potato will roast, but if you love that crispy edge with a light, fluffy and creamy interior, then floury potatoes are what's needed. To achieve the right finish, these potatoes will take at least 1 hour to cook; for extreme crispiness, cook for 1 1/2 hours.

    Recipe #91874

    Serve this with crispy oven roasted fries for a quick take on fish and chips. Yumm! (much healthier than the deep fried version as well)

    Recipe #85993

    This is Gary Rhodes recipe for a great steak and kidney pie, which also allows you the bonus of making the filling the day before you need it. Cover it and bake the following day for 45 minutes to 1 hour and dinner is ready!

    Recipe #138782

    You can make 1 jar of this or a few or a dozen at a time according to what your needs or supplies are. Leaving the beets whole for cooking prevents them from bleeding out and losing their color. I have always used the brown malt vinegar for these since white malt vinegar is harder to find. The brown vinegar will darken the color of the beets a little. These are my favorite beet pickles, better than the sweet kind! I developed this recipe from experimenting with a combination of several old recipes I found in British cookbooks and adapted it to the by the jar method I discovered in Andrea Chesman's "Summer in a Jar" cookbook. Number of servings is my guess at how many might come from one jar and cook time is the approximate time for processing in a boiling water bath.

    Recipe #127008

    This is in answer to a request on the British forum. From my beloved Mrs Beeton's Family Cookbook. Updated, naturally!

    Recipe #114151

    Just like the dainty sandwiches served at Harrods! For a less traditional tea sandwich, you can use pumpernickel, rye or sourdough bread, thinly sliced. For a visual treat, garnish the patter of sandwiches with edible flowers such as pansies or nasturtiums, along with the watercress.

    Recipe #124407

    This, quite simply, is baked onions, cheese and cream. Nothing to do with goose at all! A traditional dish from Whitley Bay, on the coast near Newcastle-upon-Tyne, I have no idea how it got its name. Never mind - it's good English "tucker" as we Aussies say, just the thing on a cold winter's night. I like it a bit more 'cheesey', so feel free to add some extra if you do too. From 'The Foody'.

    Recipe #124419

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