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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / Beautiful Breads!
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    96 recipes in

    Beautiful Breads!

    There's nothing like homemade bread! I have put my bread recipes in here. I hope you enjoy!
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    Lefse, Norwegian potato crepes, are popular in North Dakota, particularly during the winter holiday season. The thin, delicate flatbreads are cooked in a skillet until lightly browned, spread with butter and sugar and then rolled into a thin tube. Good thing one recipe makes nearly 30 crepes; they'll go quickly! Around 1870 many European immigrants from Norway settled in North Dakota's northeastern corner, especially near the Red River. They are famous for their lefse. Icelanders also arrived from Canada. From the Cooking Channel.

    Recipe #504401

    A Caribbean breakfast treat called “Bakes.” They are soft, doughy, and almost impossible to put down. Bakes are most enjoyed in the morning – think Sunday morning brunch. Despite the name, bakes are only occasionally baked. More often than not, Bakes are fried discs of dough. Enjoy plain or split open with anything from jam, cheese, meat, salt cod salad, or whatever works for you. Everyone has their own version. Cook time will vary with heat. Enjoy!

    Recipe #503332

    This is a small recipe producing small scones. It’s perfect for baking urges, and you’ll be eating well in less than thirty minutes. Each scone is only about three or four inches long. There’s a TON of berries in them, so don’t be put off if the dough doesn’t come together perfectly like sugar cookie dough. It’s going to be a messy and a little imperfect and that's perfectly okay. Scones originated in Scotland. Treat yourself! From Eat Run Live.

    Recipe #501787

    A favorite quick and easy breakfast dish. The intoxicating smell of baking cinnamon rolls and roasting apples will have you standing around the oven drooling as you peek through the oven window. This recipe originally started from the Pampered Chef recipe “Apple Nut Ring”, but over the years was evolved into a wonderfully amazing breakfast oozing with sweet frosting, plump raisins, pecans, and roasted apples. These are phenomenal served warm with a large glass of milk. Adapted from Sweet Peas Kitchen and she barely adapted it from Pampered Chef. Enjoy!

    Recipe #449429

    Fats Waller was an American jazz pianist, organist, composer and comedic entertainer. Many songs he wrote or co-wrote are still popular, such as "Honeysuckle Rose", "Ain't Misbehavin'" and "Squeeze Me". 'He was known as the soul of melody....a man who made the piano sing...both big in body and in mind...known for his generosity...a bubbling bundle of joy'. Well, if he were still around, he'd write a song about this cornbread! Adpapted from The New Basics Cookbook.

    Recipe #413361

    I lived in Big Sur off and on for about 10 years and my heart is still there. I adapted this recipe from 101 Cookbooks. Heidi Swanson says, "The Big Sur Bakery sits back off California's famous Highway 1 a bit, nestled next to a gas station. It's owners, three of them, abandoned the Los Angeles restaurant scene years ago, determined to turn a property with a lackluster track record into something special. They set their sights on a house-turned-abandoned-restaurant, eventually wrangling it into what is now the beloved Big Sur Bakery. This is a recipe from Terry "Hide" Prince, one of the bakery's earliest friends. If you can imagine a dense, seed and grain-packed English muffin, you're in the ballpark. Rather than using salt, Terry gathers kelp from the coast and uses it to season the bread. The key to enjoying these delicious little breads (and I can't emphasize this enough), is splitting them open, toasting them until they are deeply golden, then slathering them generously with butter (or drizzling with olive oil or honey). Then sprinkle with a bit more salt. Blissful buttery crunchiness." Terry Hyde, the creator of the recipe says, "There's no need to be intimidated by making my bread. It was born out of a sea voyage, from Hawaii to New Zealand, because it was easier than yeast bread. I used my friend, Jay's, Irish soda bread recipe, only I added my own super foods. Amaranth, millet, and quinoa all have the 8 essential amino acids for building muscle, flax seeds for digestion, and kelp or seaweed for vitamins and minerals. I keep a 5 gallon pickle bucket with my dry bread mix, adding whatever sounds healthy. You can substitute water for milk or beer, and spelt for a gluton free bread." There have been mixed reviews on this, so please realize this is a dense bread and please do toast it!

    Recipe #405280

    Inspired by the Sneaky Chef flour blend, I wanted to add more nutriton, so came up with this recipe. I hope you enjoy!

    Recipe #404288

    This is an extremely good and rich bread, absoutely yummy fresh from the oven but it is great chilled from the refrigerator or heated with melted butter. It can be frozen too. I make mini loaves to give as great gifts! Adapted from Mike Dolan who posted it on recipelinks and I changed it to make it my own. It would even be good with chocolate chips added! :) Makes 2 regular loaves or 4 mini loaves. Enjoy! To make the bread even healthier, try substituting 1/2 of the oil with applesauce.

    Recipe #385375

    Pretty much any type of bread will make good croutons. You can use stale pieces of baguette to the end slices of a sandwich loaf. Good croutons follow these basic rules= Make sure to cut the bread into uniform pieces, the cubes must be tossed with olive oil that has been laced with the determined spices, and the pieces must be baked in a 350*F. oven until golden. These are great served over soup and salads, even good as a munchy. Adapted from The America's Test Kitchen Family Cookbook.

    Recipe #369616

    Biscotti is sturdy enough to take to a picnic, but elegant enough to serve at a buffet. This yummy version has the rich taste of caramel. Adapted from the King Arthur flour people.

    Recipe #367049

    This recipe was adapted from the White Rocks Inn Bed & Breakfast in Wallingford, Vermont. Enjoy!I really loved these popovers! I think next time I might try using brie or pepper-jack cheese.

    Recipe #344287

    This recipe come from Savannah's Bed and Breakfast Inn in Savannah, Georgia. Enjoy!

    Recipe #344211

    A lovely Scandinavian recipe full of robust flavor!

    Recipe #341162

    Easy and delicious, slice them open to reveal the goodness of chocolate and almonds! Adapted from All The Best The Pampered Chef.

    Recipe #336424

    My father worked for J. Edgar Hoover, so when I found this recipe I had to post it! Adapted from CD Kitchens.

    Recipe #332330

    Wonderful flavor and the walnuts and raisins give it great texture. Try this bread lightly toasted with a sharp farmhouse Cheddar cheese for breakfast! Adapted from the New Basics Cookbook.

    Recipe #303575

    In order to make this ahead, sprout your wheat berries three or four days in advance. Adapted from Fresh-A Greenmarket Cookbook by Carole Schneider.

    Recipe #291222

    I hated fruitcake until I tried this. It took me 2 years to get the recipe from a friend at church. I am patient. It was worth the wait. A little history from Christmas Corner-Traditions: Fruitcake has been a holiday tradition for hundreds of years. The oldest references to fruitcake date back to Roman times, when the recipe included pomegranate seeds, pine nuts, and raisins mixed into barley mash. In Europe in the 1700s, a ceremonial type of fruitcake was baked at the end of the nut harvest and consumed the following year to celebrate the beginning of the next harvest. In the 18th century in England, there were laws restricting the use of plum cake (the generic word for dried fruit at the time) to Christmas, Easter, weddings, christenings, and funerals. Between 1837 and 1901, fruitcake was popular. It is said Queen Victoria received a fruitcake for her birthday one year, and legend has it, she put it aside for a year as a sign of restraint, moderation, and good taste. It is the custom in England for unmarried wedding guests to put a slice of the cake, traditionally a dark fruitcake, under their pillow at night so they will dream of the person they will marry. Fruitcake is full of healthy nutrients. The fruit and fiber in fruitcake is loaded with anti-oxidants, molecules that protect cells from disease and damage. The cakes contain a lot of sugar which means that water activity will be low, which keeps mold from forming and makes the cake last a long time. A fruitcake can last several months. If there's no mold, it's safe to eat, even if it has been around a while. But fruitcakes can't last forever.

    Recipe #281687

    Adapted from Tom Reilly, a staff baker in Esalen Institute’s famous kitchen while he was a Work Scholar and student there for a year and a half. When he introduced this sweet bread recipe from "The Bread Bible" he was besieged with requests to make it often – 30 loaves at a time! I lived off and on at Esalen Institute for several years during the early 70's. oh, the stories I could tell! A little history: Founded in 1962 as an alternative educational center devoted to the exploration of what "Brave New World" author Aldous Huxley called the "human potential," Esalen has attracted free-thinking philosophers, creative artists, top-notch body workers and nervous wrecks in need of Gestalt therapy for the past 40 years.

    Recipe #239447

    This is an adaptation of Sour Cream Banana Bread which I posted, then found out it was a duplicate. The difference is you use yogurt instead of sour cream. You may use plain, or be adventurous and try vanilla, lemon, or your choice of flavors! Or go ahead and use sour cream if you wish. I even used part mayonnaise once in a pinch. For the nuts, use whatever nuts you wish. So here is the recipe,I hope you enjoy! I used to make this for the Colonial Pines Inn in Highlands, NC. It was always well received, and the customers could buy a loaf to take home, which they frequently did!

    Recipe #208920

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