Recipe Sifter

X
  • Start Here
    • Course
    • Main Ingredient
    • Cuisine
    • Preparation
    • Occasion
    • Diet
    • Nutrition
1

Select () or exclude () categories to narrow your recipe search.

2

As you select categories, the number of matching recipes will update.

Make some selections to begin narrowing your results.
  • Calories
  • Amount per serving
    1. Total Fat
    2. Saturated Fat
    3. Polyunsat. Fat
    4. Monounsat. Fat
    5. Trans Fat
  • Cholesterol
  • Sodium
  • Potassium
  • Total Carbohydrates
    1. Dietary Fiber
    2. Sugars
  • Protein
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin B6
  • Vitamin B12
  • Vitamin C
  • Calcium
  • Iron
  • Vitamin E
  • Magnesium
  • Alcohol
  • Caffeine
  • Find exactly what you're looking for with the web's most powerful recipe filtering tool.

    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / Beautiful Breads!
    Lost? Site Map
    food image

    96 recipes in

    Beautiful Breads!

    There's nothing like homemade bread! I have put my bread recipes in here. I hope you enjoy!
    « Previous 1 2 3 4 5 Next »
    Displaying up to 20 pages of results. To see all results, or register.

    Wonderful flavor and the walnuts and raisins give it great texture. Try this bread lightly toasted with a sharp farmhouse Cheddar cheese for breakfast! Adapted from the New Basics Cookbook.

    Recipe #303575

    Have fun with this, it's so much easier than cooking flatbread on a rock! This is good grilled too. I haven't tried this yet. A little history: One of the things that is absolutely compelling about flatbreads is that they are old, really old. Many of the flatbreads eaten today have changed little over the last several thousand years. Flatbreads, such as sanguake in Iran, lavash in Armenia, and fetir made by the Bedouin in Israel, are all of ancient origin. When people first began cultivating grain, flatbreads were an obvious solution to the problem of how to turn hard grain into edible food; the grain could be pounded into flour, mixed with water, and cooked on a hot stone. The earliest method of cooking flatbreads probably involved spreading a dough or a batter over a very hot rock, then peeling the bread off from the rock when it had finished cooking, a method still used by the Hopi in making their remarkable blue corn piki bread. Adapted from the California Almond Board.

    Recipe #298829

    In order to make this ahead, sprout your wheat berries three or four days in advance. Adapted from Fresh-A Greenmarket Cookbook by Carole Schneider.

    Recipe #291222

    I hated fruitcake until I tried this. It took me 2 years to get the recipe from a friend at church. I am patient. It was worth the wait. A little history from Christmas Corner-Traditions: Fruitcake has been a holiday tradition for hundreds of years. The oldest references to fruitcake date back to Roman times, when the recipe included pomegranate seeds, pine nuts, and raisins mixed into barley mash. In Europe in the 1700s, a ceremonial type of fruitcake was baked at the end of the nut harvest and consumed the following year to celebrate the beginning of the next harvest. In the 18th century in England, there were laws restricting the use of plum cake (the generic word for dried fruit at the time) to Christmas, Easter, weddings, christenings, and funerals. Between 1837 and 1901, fruitcake was popular. It is said Queen Victoria received a fruitcake for her birthday one year, and legend has it, she put it aside for a year as a sign of restraint, moderation, and good taste. It is the custom in England for unmarried wedding guests to put a slice of the cake, traditionally a dark fruitcake, under their pillow at night so they will dream of the person they will marry. Fruitcake is full of healthy nutrients. The fruit and fiber in fruitcake is loaded with anti-oxidants, molecules that protect cells from disease and damage. The cakes contain a lot of sugar which means that water activity will be low, which keeps mold from forming and makes the cake last a long time. A fruitcake can last several months. If there's no mold, it's safe to eat, even if it has been around a while. But fruitcakes can't last forever.

    Recipe #281687

    Adapted from Tom Reilly, a staff baker in Esalen Institute’s famous kitchen while he was a Work Scholar and student there for a year and a half. When he introduced this sweet bread recipe from "The Bread Bible" he was besieged with requests to make it often – 30 loaves at a time! I lived off and on at Esalen Institute for several years during the early 70's. oh, the stories I could tell! A little history: Founded in 1962 as an alternative educational center devoted to the exploration of what "Brave New World" author Aldous Huxley called the "human potential," Esalen has attracted free-thinking philosophers, creative artists, top-notch body workers and nervous wrecks in need of Gestalt therapy for the past 40 years.

    Recipe #239447

    This is an adaptation of Sour Cream Banana Bread which I posted, then found out it was a duplicate. The difference is you use yogurt instead of sour cream. You may use plain, or be adventurous and try vanilla, lemon, or your choice of flavors! Or go ahead and use sour cream if you wish. I even used part mayonnaise once in a pinch. For the nuts, use whatever nuts you wish. So here is the recipe,I hope you enjoy! I used to make this for the Colonial Pines Inn in Highlands, NC. It was always well received, and the customers could buy a loaf to take home, which they frequently did!

    Recipe #208920

    This is so healthy and tasty too! For the sprouted grains you may use wheat berries,quinoa, rye, spelt, etc., even lentils! Mix and match grain sprouts to your heart's content. Adapted from the SproutPeople. When using whole wheat and/or rye flours you might add wheat gluten - at a rate of 1/8 cup per cup of flour - as it often produces a nicer loaf. Enjoy!

    Recipe #206364

    Flavorful and crisp, a wonderful accompaniment to many foods. Adapted from Partyline with the Hearty Boys.

    Recipe #191057

    These are baked in individual ramekins and eaten from the dish with a spoon. Mmmm good! Adapted from Cooking Light(Jan/2006)

    Recipe #190934

    Pears and walnuts pair up so well together! Anjou or Bartlett pears work well for this recipe. Adapted from Cooking Light magazine(Jan/2006). Enjoy!

    Recipe #190684

    These are full of flavor and great to take to a picnic! Adapted from Everyday Italian.

    Recipe #178831

    This is easy and goes great with dinner, soup, stew, and also makes a great snack!

    Recipe #178911

    This is a rich cream cheese dough filled with preserves and nuts. These taste just like the pastries from Ebinger's Bakery in Queens, New York. Adapted from Rosie's All Butter Fresh Cream Sugar Packed No Holds Barred Baking Book.

    Recipe #174852

    This is an Asian dessert via Hawaii! Adapted from America the Majestic cookbook. Instead of making the wraps, you could just buy wonton wrappers.

    Recipe #175012

    To make this for gifts, combine dry ingredients in a jar and include a copy of the full recipe. This recipe doubles easily for multiple jars. Adapted from Country Home magazine.

    Recipe #162038

    Coiled buns made with cream cheese with a powdered sugar glaze, mmmm...mmmmmmm! This recipe won grand prize in the yummy yeast rolls contest and was submitted by Susan Peck from Republic, Missouri. Susan says she sometimes substitutes cherry or blueberry pie filling for the cream cheese. She has also sprinkled her rolls with cinnamon sugar and sliced almonds and reshaped the recipe to make a yeast coffee cake. Adapted from Country Woman magazine(2004). Prep time includes rising time.

    Recipe #161814

    Okay, go out and buy some puff pastry sheets! Then go back to your kitchen, and make these! You won't be sorry!

    Recipe #160424

    Graham crackers made with coconut milk and molasses? Yummo! Adapted from Country Home magazine.

    Recipe #159003

    I used to make this for a Bread and Breakfast Inn in Highlands, N.C. This is a variation on my Sour Cream Banana Bread, which turned out to be a duplicate recipe here on Zaar. So, in loving memory of my dear banana bread, here is one of the variations! You will love this! You may use flavored yogurt to kick this up a notch! Try vanilla! This also makes a great gift!

    Recipe #157475

    A delicious bread. Try not to eat the whole loaf at one sitting! Adapted from Cook Now Serve Later cookbook. New England, Scandinavian, Mid Atlantic, South, West, Mid West

    Recipe #146444

    « Previous 1 2 3 4 5 Next »
    Displaying up to 20 pages of results. To see all results, or register.
    Advertisement

    Free Weekly Newsletter

    Get the latest recipes and tips delivered right to your inbox.

    Your e-mail is safe. Privacy Policy
    Advertisement

    Food.com Network of Sites

    • Mexican Recipes
    • Chinese Recipes
    • Australian Recipes
    • Breakfast Recipes
    • Greek Recipes
    • Restaurant Recipes
    • Italian Recipes
    • Christmas Recipes
    • Thanksgiving Recipes
    • Southern Recipes
    • Dessert Recipes
    • Deep Fried Recipes
    • Thai Recipes
    • Low Cholesterol Recipes
    • Indian Recipes
    • Healthy Recipes
    • Meatloaf Recipes