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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / Asia ~ ZWT #6
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    12 recipes in

    Asia ~ ZWT #6


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    Just in time for Chinese New Year! My take on classic Spring Rolls, filled with minced chicken and crisp Chinese seasoned vegetables. I decided to shape these into little square bundles (As I remember seeing in the Far East on Laundry Days), rather than the usual elongated rolls - you can then tie the bundles with fresh chives blades if you have any, although that is not necessary, just a nice idea for a classy presentation! The RSC ingredients I have used in this recipe are: Spring roll wrappers, fresh cilantro leaves, soy sauce, chicken breast, broccoli slaw mix, fresh cucumbers and peanut butter. I hope you have as much fun as I did when I made these!

    Recipe #354062

    A fabulous way of adding a bit of colour along with a crisp texture in Chinese cooking; this can be made just before you are ready to serve an Oriental meal, and is one of the nicest ways I know of dressing up the humble radish! You can use red radishes, Chinese white radish - Mooli or even black radishes for this quick pickle. Serve it as an accompaniment for most Chinese or Asian meals. Make sure that whatever type of radishes you use, are fresh, firm and crisp. I prefer the red radishes for colour, but any of the radishes I have suggested work well in this simple pickle. The quantities listed below, will serve about 4 people as a generous condiment.

    Recipe #306079

    I LOVE Jimmy's Kitchen in Hong Kong - not the modern restaurant that is operating now, but the old one from the 1960's that was situated in Hong Kong Central. (The original Jimmy's Kitchen first opened in 1928 in Hong Kong.) This is my take on a favourite dish I used to have there many moons ago - curried fish; a whole fish cooked in the pan and lightly curried. You can make this as hot as you want - I always had it HOT when I ate it there! Use any firm white fish fillets, I use panga in France, but snapper, tilapia, sea bream or even plaice would be good. You can cut the fish into smaller pieces for ease of pan frying if you wish - I just like the "whole" fish effect on my plate when I serve this! No need to serve this with anything else other than piles of steamed or boiled white rice and maybe some radish pickle, sweet chilli sauce and soy sauce on the side. Adjust the heat to suit your guests or yourselves - and don't forget the ice cold San Miguel beer!

    Recipe #304509

    I discovered this yellowing paper cutting in my Mum's recipe scrapbook recently - this recipe is the one we always used to use when I was younger. The recipe was posted in the South China Morning Post in 1963 - by a chef from The Repulse Bay Hotel - that lovely old Colonial hotel is sadly no longer there......they used to have this great satay on the menu, as well as the MOST amazing Club Sandwiches! Absolutely authentic and I have decided to share it with you all!! If some of the language is a bit archaic - it is because I have decided to post it, as it was written in the paper at the time!

    Recipe #229127

    This Anglo-Indian recipe is more a relish than a chutney, but it can be used like a chutney in cooking, as well as a condiment. A real "must" in this recipe are the Nigella Seeds, also known as Black Onion Seeds - these give the Relish/Chutney an authentic Indian flavour, as well as making it very special. It is delicious with all types of cheese boards, cold cuts and meat platters, burgers, sausages, curries and also when used in sandwiches. My daughter loves this in toasted cheese sandwiches! Or, give a jar as a gift as I often do! I couldn't resist giving it a "magical" name, especially as India is famous for its Rubies and Emeralds!

    Recipe #254269

    The British have always been fond of highly spiced food, a taste which can be traced back in our cooking to medieval times and which can be seen today in our pungent commercially prepared sauces and mustards. This tasty curried broth belongs to the early nineteenth century and is part of the heritage of the British Raj. British people who spent years in India grew to love the local spicy food and brought back their favourite recipes which were adapted in the Victorian kitchen. "Pepper Water" was the nearest thing to soup in the cuisine of India, and indeed the word mulligatawny comes from the Tamil words molegoo (pepper) and tunes (water). It was originally a vegetarian 'sauce', but the British added meat and various other ingredients to create a variety of mulligatawnies, which were popular in India and Ceylon, but had an extremely bad press back home in England! A basic peppered water was flavoured with various other ingredients, then the soup would be served with side bowls of cooked rice, lime wedges, grated coconut, snippets of fried bacon, quartered hard-boiled eggs and sliced chillies. You helped yourself to what you wanted - a meal in itself. I serve mine with Raita and Chutney, and sometimes hard-boiled eggs, you can add whatever you like to the basic soup posted below. This recipe was taken from The Memsahib's Cookbook and has been adapted to personal taste.

    Recipe #257944

    Garam Masala is an aromatic and hot spice mixture that is essential to numerous types of dishes in Indian, Nepalese and Pakistani cooking. The words mean "hot spices" and as well as adding the "heat" to Indian cooking, the spice mix should be subtle and aromatic. It is usually added towards the end of the cooking time, or even as a final garnish, unlike commercial curry powders that need to "cook" off the cornflour and other anti-clogging ingredients. This is my favourite Garam Masala mixture; there is no "standardised" recipe for this spice mixture, but I suspect that every Indian, Nepalese and Pakistani home will have their own "secret" mix! Grind the spices in smallish quantities to preserve the flavour and quality of the mixture, and then store in an airtight container, away from direct sunlight and heat. NB: Black cumin seeds are also called Royal Cumin or Shah Zeera. This spice mix makes a great gift - especially if you tie a recipe card around the neck of the jar with a whole piece of cinnamon!

    Recipe #279714

    The Singapore Sling is one of those wonderful drinks that we probably have all heard of, but perhaps have never had. And because this recipe is often incorrectly recorded in most recipe books, even if you've think you've had it, you probably haven't. One of the key, and often overlooked ingredients in this drink is Benedictine. While the resulting flavour is not overly predominate, it does add a certain taste profile that would be totally missing without this secret ingredient. None dispute that the Singapore Sling was originally created by Mr. Ngiam Tong Boon for the Raffles Hotel in Singapore. However that is where the agreements end. The exact date is in question, with some people claiming it was in 1915, some 1913, while the hotel itself claims that it was created sometime prior to 1910. There is also plenty of disagreement as to how closely the current version of this drink that is served at Raffles is to what was originally served. Apparently the original recipe was lost and forgotten sometime in the 1930's, and the drink that they currently serve at the hotel's Long Bar (see recipe below) is based on memories of former bartenders, and some written notes that they were able to discover. Whatever the truth may be, this "iconic" drink is still enjoyed today, as much as it was back in the early 20th century! Maybe, the only way to really appreciate this cocktail, is to sip it slowly whilst sitting in a rattan chair, under the ceiling fans in the Long Bar at Raffles Hotel!

    Recipe #283673

    An absolute must as an accompaniment to curry or wonderful as a starter for an Indian meal. Onion Bhajis are tasty little onion balls bound together with lightly spiced and fragrant chickpea flour batter. Serve these with coriander chutney or cucumber raita. You will ALWAYS be offered these on any British Indian restaurant menu; they also make great snacks if served with salad and assorted chutneys and spicy dips. You can lighten these up a little bit by frying them, and then allowing them to drain over a wire rack before reheating them in a medium to hot oven for about 3 to 5 minutes.

    Recipe #288345

    A wonderfully fragrant and spiced Indian chicken dish, with saffron and cardamom studded rice. This has become a popular and much loved family recipe; an Indian friend who was studying Art with me many years ago, used to make this for all of us Art students every Saturday night; she finally shared the recipe with us before we all graduated! I have been making this for over 30 years now, and I have never changed a thing! Serve this with cool cucumber raita, sambals and naan bread, for a delectable "one Pot" Indian feast. NB: As one reviewer found out, if you use brown rice in this recipe, this adds considerably to the cooking time and you will need more liquid; brown rice takes longer to cook and takes about a third more liquid!

    Recipe #292393

    I have a great deal of admiration for the Ghurka people, as well as happy memories. I went to school with several Ghurka children when I lived in Hong Kong during the 60's and 70's - they were my close friends in the playground as well as in the school room. I was also lucky enough to be invited to their homes for SUPERB Nepalese food, of which one dish was this delicious Chicken Cardamom. This is the way Chicken Cardamom is REALLY cooked. It is not difficult to make and does not take very long either. Cooking it to this recipe will produce a totally authentic dish that will appeal to a wide range of palates. I have posted this recipe because it is so TASTY and the mix of flavours is truly astonishing. This is not a fire breathing curry, but it is warm and subtle. My preference is a long glass of light lager or a few glasses of a dry white wine to accompany the meal. Serve with a jug of water with lemon slices and ice cubes for those thirsty diners. This recipe will make enough for 8 good sized portions. Divide everything by 2 for a standard meal - but keep the cooking times the same - and if you do scale down the quantities just keep an eye on the dish that it does not burn. Historical Note: The Gurkhas are soldiers that have served in the British Army for many years. They come from the Himalayas and they are feared all over the world. The first Gurkhas were fighting men from the mountain kingdom of Nepal -- Rai, Magar, Limbu, Gurung and Sunwar tribesmen.(I found this recipe on the Hidden England website, and I have enjoyed it many times since discovering it!)

    Recipe #290007

    A classic Indian recipe is absolutely delectable and is a real favourite in our house, frequently served on Curry Friday - a popular family tradition! This world famous recipe is often jokingly referred to as the national bird of Punjab, so popular is it in that region! This recipe is by Gordon Ramsey, and here is what he has to say about it: Gordon: "Butter chicken, or murgh makhani, was one of the first dishes I tasted when I went to India. Its origins can be traced back to Moghul times, but the dish and its history is most closely associated with Delhi's famous Moti Mahal restaurant, where I had the pleasure of eating this fantastic dish. Over time, numerous chefs have attempted to emulate the rich buttery sauce, and flavours vary slightly between restaurants. This is my version of the classic dish."

    Recipe #422848


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