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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / Alli's Creole/Cajun
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    11 recipes in

    Alli's Creole/Cajun


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    Saw this and just had to try it! Sounds perfect for the summer! From Bobby Flay - (**My Note: It is possible to substitute the rum for rum flavoring (or extract) - I'd say 1 drop, maybe 2, depending on your taste.**)

    Recipe #480231

    This recipe just won top prize in the 2012 Martha White/Lodge Cast Iron National Cornbread Cook-Off. They sound amazing! Published in my local paper, The Virginian Pilot on 05/30/12. **NOTE: Fresh peaches OR pineapple may be substituted for mango in the salsa.**

    Recipe #480219

    Emeril's Creole Sauce from the Emeril Live episode, Gone Fishin'. Cool the sauce without the shrimp and store in an air-tight container in the refrigerator for up to 4 days. Taken from Emeril's.com; posted for ZWT 5.

    Recipe #372830

    From Emeril's.com; posted for ZWT 5.

    Recipe #372846

    Taken from Emerils.com; posted for ZWT 5.

    Recipe #373007

    Taken from the book,"Every day's a Party" by Emeril Lagasse; posted for ZWT 5.

    Recipe #372982

    From Emeril's cookbook Louisiana Real and Rustic; posted for ZWT 5. "Long ago, before modern highways, it was near impossible for country children to get the golden beignets that their city cousins enjoyed. However, they managed quite well with these little friend doughnut-like cakes. They are NOT like the classic French croquignoles, which are glazed crunchy biscuits."

    Recipe #373026

    Posted from "Every Day's a Party" by Emeril Lagasse; posted for ZWT 5. From the intro to the recipe - "Shrimp stew is practically a staple dish in the area of Louisiana known as Acadiana, in the southern part of the state. Old time cooks garnished the dish with chopped hard-boil eggs. If you can, purchase shrimp with the heads and tails intact so that you can use them to make a stock. (In a pinch, you can substitute 1 quart of chicken broth.)"

    Recipe #373035

    Taken from Emeril Lagasse's book - "Every Day's a Party"; posted for ZWT 5. This is from Michelle's (who works at Emeril's 'home base' in New Orleans) grandmother, Priscilla. Sometimes called Pecan Lace cookies because once baked, they are as delicate as old lace. May be served with ice cream. May be stored in an air-tight container for a week.

    Recipe #373061

    Taken from Emeril Lagasse's book - "Every Day's a Party"; posted for ZWT 5. Taken from the recipe intro - "The oils in the flesh and seeds of the peppers are quite volatile. You should wear rubber gloves when handling them, being careful not to touch your face or eyes while working with the peppers." **Refrigeration / 'aging' time is NOT included in prep or cooking time.

    Recipe #373063

    From Emeril Lagasse's book "Every Day's a Party"; posted for ZWT 5. From the intro to the recipe: "When the Sazerac was first created, it contained an imported cognac made by a company called Sazerac-Deflorge et Fils of Limoges, France. The mixture changed in the late 1870's, when American rye whiskey was substituted for the brandy." The original recipe is attributed to Antoine Amadie Peychaud, a Creole apothecary. It was originally served in an egg cup, known as a 'coquetier' in French. Some historians think the word 'cocktail' comes from a mispronunciation of the word. This recipe was provided by Marcelle Bienvenu after a newspaper assignment.

    Recipe #373146


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