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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / A Little Gem! The Salad Potager Cookbook
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    21 recipes in

    A Little Gem! The Salad Potager Cookbook

    Crisp, cool, lovely fresh salads! I love salads, we eat them throughout the summer and the winter. I have harvested all my salad recipes together, and have put them here in this little salad potager cookbook - for your amusement and enjoyment!
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    This was the first thing I was taught to make at secondary school in Domestic Science! We were all taught to make basic lemon syrup for the fruit salad, a great classic and a standard recipe that I have never forgotten! However, here I have deviated a little and have taken advantage of some excellent local peach syrup instead of the homemade lemon syrup I usually make; and I have garnished the salad with mint and angelica from my herb garden. I have suggested certain fruits to use, but the beauty of a fresh fruit salad is that you can always rustle one up with whatever you have locally and to hand. Serve with fresh pouring cream for a real treat!

    Recipe #383182

    This is a wonderful, light summery dessert, which never fails to please my guests, as well as my family and friends! Fresh peaches are soaked in sweet Sauternes with angelica leaves and lavender flowers tucked amongst them. Angelica is an interesting, aromatic tasting herb, and although I normally only use the stems to candy or crystallise (Recipe #248003) I have discovered that the leaves also make a great accompaniment when used with fresh fruit. Try to serve this fresh fruit salad in a large clear glass bowl for maximum impact; it just looks so pretty with the light shining through the fruit, juices and herbs! I find that the only thing that is needed to serve this is a good dollop of crème fraiche. I have also made this with apricots and melon for a slight change. I like to use a combination of white and yellow peaches for this recipe – but please use local and fresh peaches regional to your area. Prep time includes the minimum "soaking" time. I have not tried this with tinned peaches, but suspect that they may be too "soft" to hold their shape for prolonged soaking.

    Recipe #382163

    A very easy French Dressing with a few twists. This is a make ahead recipe wth a yield of about 250 mls or 1/4 pint; it keeps for about 7 to 10 days with no problems at all. I have stated dried herbs & seasonings - you can use fresh herbs & seasonings too, but this decreases the keeping time slightly. The oil content in this is considerably lower than most classic French dressings - making it a healthier option, and you know what has gone into it too!

    Recipe #206527

    The salad cream that most of us in the UK know, love and use was invented by Heinz in 1914 and was very popular with working classes; a truly socialist salad dressing if you will. However, its popularity waned in the latter part of the century, with the arrival of the decadent mayonnaise, flaunting its Continental French and Spanish roots and pushing the humble salad cream to one side. However, like any good socialist, salad cream would not go away and still remains a firm favourite in the UK with people who have refused to climb that social ladder to mayonnaise!! My recipe for homemade salad cream comes from Mrs Beeton's cookbook originally, but I have made some modifications. Mrs Beeton uses quite a lot of vinegar in my humble opinion, but the recipe is flexible so add more if you wish. I prefer salad cream when I am trying to cut back on fat - plus I rather like it's tangy flavour, and it is truly wonderful when spooned over hard boiled eggs or fresh lettuce leaves. Or, try it in sandwiches and dips, for a lighter taste to mayonnaise.

    Recipe #359598

    An old Elizabethan salad recipe, but with an air of modernity about it, as our interest increases in herbal and floral remedies in today's busy, stressful and hectic world. I have made some suggestions about which flowers and herbs to use - but PLEASE do check that the flowers and herbs you choose to use are edible!! The French also use flowers in their salads, and although the title suggests this to be an English recipe, this style of herbal and floral salad will have been very common throughout Medieval Europe. I serve this at the Auberge when the flowers and herbs are in season - freshly picked from my garden; it is always enjoyed with great relish and is a vibrant topic of dinner party conversation! It makes a lovely appetiser or can be served with the cheese course for an unusual and pretty accompaniment. Make sure that your flowers and herbs are insecticide free, and are not traffic polluted as well.........wipe them or wash them gently, allowing them to dry before using them.

    Recipe #290473

    A fabulous way of adding a bit of colour along with a crisp texture in Chinese cooking; this can be made just before you are ready to serve an Oriental meal, and is one of the nicest ways I know of dressing up the humble radish! You can use red radishes, Chinese white radish - Mooli or even black radishes for this quick pickle. Serve it as an accompaniment for most Chinese or Asian meals. Make sure that whatever type of radishes you use, are fresh, firm and crisp. I prefer the red radishes for colour, but any of the radishes I have suggested work well in this simple pickle. The quantities listed below, will serve about 4 people as a generous condiment.

    Recipe #306079

    I have lots of wonderful wild purslane growing in my garden, and apart from adding it to salads, it is extremely useful in keeping the weeds down! Although purslane is rarely seen on our own tables today, this pretty herb has a long and interesting history. English medieval cooks and gardeners loved purslane; in fact, it is often known as the “Elizabethan Salad Herb” in the UK, as it was extremely popular as a form of greenery during that era. I absolutely love it in salads and remember eating it in Cyprus when I lived there – my Turkish Cypriot friends picked it from wasteland where the local Turkish word is Semizotu. It is thought that the genus name, Portulaca, is from the Latin porto and laca meaning ‘milk carrier’ in reference to its milky sap. The species name oleracea is Latin and means ‘potherb’. Native to Persia and India, it was introduced into Europe by Arabs in the 15th century as a salad herb. Purslane makes an excellent edible ground cover and in many countries, it is cultivated as a vegetable, though many unknowingly consider it a weed. It was once believed to offer protection from evil spirits. Purslane is very nutritious and is rich in Vitamin C and alpha linolenic acid (one of the Omega-3 fatty acids).which the body converts into the essential fatty acids known as EPA: almost 3 percent of purslane by weight consists of alpha-, beta-, and gamma-carotene and lutein. Not only is it easy to grow purslane in your home garden, it is hard to keep it from overrunning other plants. When the plants are young, they make a tart but succulent addition to salads with just a little washing and dicing. After the plants are mature, they are best parboiled in salted water for 1-2 minutes before adding them to salads. In New Mexican cuisine, purslane is known as verdolagas, and is commonly fried with onions, added to pinto beans, or used as a herb in potato salads.

    Recipe #380139

    I love my lovage! Moreover, this is a delectable way to use up cold cooked chicken with this wonderful old-fashioned herb! This salad would be perfect for a light luncheon dish or an elegant dinner party starter. I have also made this to take on picnics with great success. Lovage is one of my favourite herbs and I have been growing it for the last 20 years in my herb garden. It is only now regaining its popularity - however, it was a much-used herb in medieval times, and later on, it was often used as a salt substitute. The leaves have a slightly salty, savoury celery-like flavour and are very pungent, so they mused be used carefully in cooking. Anything more than 2 tablespoons of chopped lovage in this dressing will totally overpower all the other flavours - I know this to my cost! An obscure little-known fact! Culinary celery salt and celery seeds are nearly always made with ground lovage seeds, as lovage seeds have a more distinct celery flavour than celery seeds! I am a mine of useful or useless information!

    Recipe #381286

    This fruit salad is amazing, and all the more for the addition of bergamot leaves and flowers! The fragrant leaves of this versatile herb delicately flavour the syrup whilst the gorgeous shaggy red flowers and scented pelargonium leaves decorate it for the final finishing flourish! If you are a lover of Earl Gray tea, you will instantly recognise the flavour of this herb, as it is used to flavour this famous and popular tea blend. NOTE: Bergamot, often referred to as bee balm, became distinguished as "Oswego Tea" when a Quaker botanist, John Bartram, sampled a tea made from the leaves. A Bergamot lemon is a small yellow sour citrus fruit similar to an orange, mostly cultivated in Calabria in Italy. The rind contains an essential oil used in perfumery (the basis for eau-de-cologne), confectionary and Earl Grey tea. The zest is also used in pâtisserie. NB: Prep time includes cooling time.

    Recipe #381682

    A delightful old French salad recipe, which uses fresh aromatic herbs with fresh lettuce leaves and a simple dressing. Serve this with poached salmon or cold chicken for an elegant dinner party dish. Adapted from a 16th century French translation of a book originally written in Latin in 1474. NB: Borage is an excellent culinary herb and can be used in a variety of ways. Borage is far better used fresh, as the flavour and colour deteriorate when dried and some essential oils lost. Traditional recipes recommend borage leaves and seeds, together with fennel in salads for increasing the milk supply in nursing mothers. The leaves and flowers are still added for flavour and garnish to wine cups, Pimms and gin-based summer cocktails and the flowers are still candied for confectionary as cake and ice cream decorations.

    Recipe #381683

    A dazzling coleslaw salad for your winter festive table. Red cabbage is mixed with apples, carrots, pecans and onions which is then dressed with a tangy mustard and nut vinaigrette - fabulous! Plus, the colours as well as the taste, is amazing! This goes so well with cold cuts, pies, tarts, quiches, buffets as well as being a wonderful supper or light lunch accompaniment. I do all the shredding and grating in my food processor, it is so easy and cuts down on time. You can of course grate and shred by hand - it will just take a little longer! I sometimes add semi-dried cranberries and grated beetroot - these are listed as optional exras. The pie shown in the photograph, is my Recipe #268117, which I often serve with this winter slaw salad - they make a wonderful combination. (This recipe was posted to our personal preferences - with a light dressing and not a creamy or heavy dressing; if you like your salads with more dressing - please adjust the dressing quantities up!)

    Recipe #268834

    I grow this wonderful old fashioned herb in my herb garden, it's one of my favourites - I love it's warm celery-lemon flavour. Lovage was used extensively during the Middle ages - right up to Victorian times - then it somehow fell out of fashion, which is such a shame as it is such a versatile and interesting herb. This is a wonderful creamy salad dressing, which perks up any mundane leaves - I like to serve it with Mache or Lamb's Lettuce and Tomatoes for a simple and yet elegant starter. It also works well with cooked spring vegetables such as peas, baby carrots, new potatoes and young broad beans.

    Recipe #253325

    We often eat this simple salad for lunch, only accompanied by crusty French baguette and a glass of wine! Feel free to substitute the Roquefort for a blue cheese that is readily available where you live; it is also superb with Stilton & Shropshire Blue cheese. I have served this as a dinner party starter & also in place of a "just" cheese course as well! If you cannot obtain walnut oil, any other nut oil will be fine, or a good olive oil. This recipe serves 6 people for a light luncheon or 8-10 people as a dinner party starter.

    Recipe #210346

    A light, fresh and very tasty potato salad, which is more of a meal than a side dish! I made this up when I had a few spears of fresh asparagus left, some boiled potatoes and some honey roast ham in the fridge! This recipe/idea is for two people - but it can be increased with ease, hence my listing of the ingredients in numbers, rather than in ounces or grammes! The dressing can be made ahead......and, hopefully it will be warm enough to sit outside and soak up the spring or early summer sun......c'est Parfait!

    Recipe #226549

    This is one of my favourite Summer salad recipes.....the vibrant colours are amazing, as are all the mingling flavours! The baby fennel bulbs are roasted until charred and then simply served with fresh oranges, black olives, red onion, fresh mint and a divine orange vinaigrette! I serve this alongside grilled, roast or barbequed Duck or Lamb - it is also great when served with a good grilled Steak.

    Recipe #228720

    This cucumber salad goes well with just any kind of meal. In Sweden, strong white distilled vinegar is usually used (12%), which gives the cucumber salad the correct sweet-and-sour flavour and a wonderful fresh and refreshing taste.

    Recipe #235063

    An absolute "must" as an accompaniment to the Swedish Smorgasbord, this salad is very easy to make and is delicious with cold meats, fish, potatoes and open sandwiches.

    Recipe #235226

    This chicken salad is very zingy and fresh flavoured - and, is made with handy ingredients! Great for lunches, snacks, picnics or even as a sandwich filling. Adjust the curry powder to suit your own personal taste.

    Recipe #243378

    This is my adaptation of the much loved and famous recipe created by Constance Spry for the Queen's Coronation lunch in 1953. I make this regularly for picnics and buffets; it is also amazing as a sandwich filler. In 1953, curry powder would have been used - but I find that curry paste works better. Use any type of poached or cooked chicken - I usually cook a couple of chicken breasts just for this recipe, however, a whole cooked chicken works very well; don't forget to remove the skin and check for bones first. This recipe is based on the Coronation Chicken recipe in: The Constance Spry Cookery Book by Constance Spry & Rosemary Hulme (1956).

    Recipe #245746

    It's fig time here in SW France, and I have been busy making up new fig recipes, as well as making jams, pickles, alcohol steeped figs and chutneys with all our harvest! This was thrown together one Sunday afternoon as a starter for a lazy Al Fresco Sunday lunch - and since then I have had requests for it nearly every day! If you are lucky enough to have a fig tree, try and garnish the individual plates with a couple of washed leaves - it really adds a certain panache to the appearance of the salad! I have made this with Chevre - Goat's Cheese as well as Feta, and it was just as delicious. Amounts given are for a starter for 6 people - and assuming that the figs are medium to large in size; please adjust the quantities if necessary. Toasting the walnuts beforehand is well worth the effort, and if you toast more than is needed, any excess can be stored in an airtight container.

    Recipe #250866

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