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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / 4 Ratings
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    8 recipes in

    4 Ratings


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    This is based on a recipe from Beatrice Ojakangas’, Great Holiday Baking Book. She explains, “Australians still participate in the tradition of four o’clock afternoon tea, which can be a simple or formal occasion, and features a selection of sandwiches, scones, cookies, and cakes that are fancy and plain. This is the time to rest and ‘restoke the furnace.’ These thin, crisp oat and coconut drop cookies are a welcome part of the simplest or most elaborate tea." I haven’t yet tried this.

    Recipe #371385

    This is a great recipe based on one from Emeril Lagasse's book, Louisiana Real & Rustic. He says, "Believe it or not, this now-familiar crawfish dish was not known beyond Louisiana until the late 1940s or early 1950s when the oil boom brought an influx of outsiders to Acadiana, and in particular to Breaux Bridge, in St. Martin Parish, now home of the world-famous crawfish festival. It was in this small town on Bayou Teche, or so some food historians tell us, that crawfish etouffee originated. At the time it was unfashionable, except for Acadians, to eat mudbugs. Now just about the whole world flocks to Breaux Bridge for the rich, full flavors of etouffee. Serve it with steamed rice." Since crawfish can be difficult to find in our parts, I've occassionally substituted lobster, in which case, I cook the shells in water and use this water in place of the plain water called for in the recipe.

    Recipe #367568

    This is based on Dana Carpender's recipe from her book 500 Low-Carb Recipes. She is my all time favorite low-carb recipe writer -- she's the real deal. I make this for my husband and I in place of mashed potatoes and we love it. Dana recommends either adding a few cloves of sliced garlic to the cooking water or roasted garlic to the food processor when blending for "a little zing" -- I take the roasted garlic route myself.

    Recipe #262668

    Based on a recipe from Bon Appetit's March 1989 issue, in the Cooking for Friends, section. Prep and cook times do not include the 4 hours to overnight marination. These could not be easier or more tasty. They do it for me! They're great!

    Recipe #374300

    Based on a recipe from Marlene Koch’s book, Fantastic Food with Splenda. She says in its intro, “Hoisin is a thick, sweet, spicy condiment used extensively in Asian cuisine. In addition to being spread on pancakes for mu shu pork, it is used for delicious stir-fry barbecue sauces like this one.” She also offers this tip: “Hoisin is made from soybeans, chilies, garlic, ginger, and sugar. Brands vary quite a bit from one to another. It should be very dark and have a complex flavor. Koon Chun is one preferred brand.” Prep and cook times do not include the marinating time.

    Recipe #367839

    This is based on a recipe from Madge Rosenberg's cookbook, The Best Bread Machine Cookbook Ever - Ethnic Breads. She says, "These fritters, similar to what we know as beignets, make inexpensive party food rich in natural fruit flavors. Children will enjoy munching these crispies with milk, but the big kids will eat their way through an endless supply with coffee or beer." My kind of fritters!

    Recipe #279838

    I found this refreshing drink recipe in a Myers's Rum pamphlet.

    Recipe #346566

    Based on a recipe from Heidi Haughy Cusick’s book, Soul and Spice, African Cooking in the Americas. This book is chock-filled with Caribbean, Bahia Brazilian, and Louisiana Creole recipes. She says, “Known as tablette in the Caribbean and cocada in Bahia, this confection combines the Spanish and Portuguese penchant for sweets with the African resourcefulness for using available ingredients: sugar from the cane fields and the abundant adopted coconut. Easy to make, these candies have been satisfying sweet tooths in the Caribbean for two centuries.” Historical note: Sugarcane came to the Caribbean with Columbus on his second voyage in 1494, when he established the first European settlement in the West Indies on Hispaniola; unrefined brown sugar was most commonly used in households; it came in foots, hard cylinders that were grated for use. I haven’t tried this yet.

    Recipe #373982


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