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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / 2006 WT Asia
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    2006 WT Asia

    This coobook contains my Asian recipes for the Zaar World Tour. Some are true Asian dishes and for many of those you will need to buy the ingredients from an Asian shop. Others are inspired by Asian ingredients such as soy sauce, curry paste or typical Asian spices and herbs.
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    Somebody was requesting a lentil soup recipe without tomatoes. Here is the one I know. I made it last winter and I really liked it. The recipe says it's low-fat and the soup is definitely quick to throw together. I'm not sure if I used lime as stated or lemon, since I don't usually have lime at home, but do the rest of the ingredients. That's another good thing about this recipe; it uses storecupboard ingredients. I am already looking forward to prepare this soup again when it gets colder... You can use whatever curry paste you fancy. I used a korma paste. This soup freezes well, yet another advantage. I didn't use the yogurt, I tried it with the yogurt, but I preferred it without. However, I thought you might like it with that's why I didn't leave it out.

    Recipe #133459

    This is a lovely marinade for barbecued or fried chicken. I usually use it for chicken breasts cut into not too thin stripes which I cook on a table barbecue. Most raclette gadgets in Switzerland also include a barbecue facility. In the winter I like to invite people for a raclette and table barbecue evening and the marinated chicken stripes are always part of it. Everybody loves them! I found this marinade in a chicken cooking book and there they recommend it in particular for chicken thighs meat (bones removed). I'm sure it will be nice with whatever part of chicken you fancy. Just remember that the bigger the parts you want to fry/barbecue, the longer the meat should be in the marinade. You may even want to marinate your meat overnigt.

    Recipe #133785

    I like to make my own curry paste. This way I know that the compliments I get for my curries are entirely up to myself. The good thing is that the paste keeps for a couple of weeks in the fridge and can be frozen. The paste makes wonderful presents too. I give them away together with coconut milk, some kaffir lime leaves (I have my own plant), and some ideas how to use it. I also tell them that they can wrap whatever they won't use in tin foil and freeze. The recipe comes from Madhur Jaffrey's Curry Bible, a wonderful book. You will find coriander with roots in Asian stores, but don't worry if you can't find the roots, Madhur Jaffrey writes that you can use a small handful of the leaves instead. However, your paste then won't be as red as when using the roots. This paste is enough for two dishes of pork, beef, chicken, prawns, squid, fish, crabs, lobster meat or hard-boiled eggs.

    Recipe #133926

    I love making my own curry pastes for my favourite Thai curries. Yellow Curry Paste is milder than Red or Green Curry Paste because it contains less chillies. Curry powder and turmeric make the paste yellow. Different to the Red and Green Curry Paste it also contains cinnamon but no coriander roots. This paste keeps for two weeks in the fridge but it also freezes well. Just wrap some of the paste (say 2-3 tablespoons) in tinfoil, label, and freeze. This way, you will always have curry paste and it can even be used frozen (well, that's at least what I sometimes do). The recipe comes from Madhur Jaffreys Ultimate Curry Bible and she got it from the Grand Hyatt Erawan in Bangkok. This paste is enough for two dishes of pork, beef, chicken, prawns, squid, fish, crabs, lobster meat or hard-boiled eggs. For a Red Curry Paste see recipe #133926.

    Recipe #135878

    I've recently turned 30 and invited my friends to my place to an Indian/Singaporean meal. I served these mini garlic naans as an appetizer and they disappeared quickly. The original recipe didn't ask to sprinkle them with salt, but I did a batch with and without and preferred the salted ones. I also sprinkled some with fresh coriander (cilantro), although the original recipe only called for parsley. I have changed the baking temperature to 375°C, as one reviewer pointed out that the naans were done in about 8 minutes at a temperature of 375°F.

    Recipe #140376

    This is the suggested side dish to go with Recipe #141328. Some Raita is also nice with it.

    Recipe #141400

    Mackerel is a cheap and underrated fish. If you like spicy food, this one is for you. It's dead simple and really quick. Serve this to your dinner guests (if they don't mind whole fish), as this is really impressive and they will think you have been in the kitchen for ages... Let them open their individual parcels at the table. All the flavours will stream into their nose...lovely. I always serve some Raita with it because this cools the spicy fish. You may use the Simple Raita below (at the end of the directions) or use your own. Also nice with it is the Beetroot Relish (also below) or any kind of salad. I think some plain rice would be nice as well. Recipe source is the 'Good Food' magazine (March 04).

    Recipe #141328

    Another great recipe from the 'Good Food' magazine (January 2003). This dish was created by Sara Buenfeld as part of a New Year's day buffet with a touch of Indian glamour. The recipe for this lightly spiced salmon serves 8, but can easily be adapted to serve any number really. It can be part of a buffet or served on individual plates. It is great for entertaining because it's impressive, not much work is involved, and you can prepare the salmon up to a day ahead. I will soon post the suggested side dishes to the salmon (Potato salad with curried mayo / Chicory and orange salad with ginger dressing).

    Recipe #141533

    This MILDLY SPICED salad is my favourite potato salad. I love curries and this recipe uses Madras curry paste as part of the dressing. I like to take this salad with me to work or university for a tasty packed lunch. It will yield 4 servings as a main dish, or 8 as a side. This is the suggested side dish with Roast Salmon with Spiced Coconut Crumbs (Recipe #141533), which is printed in the 'Good Food Magazine' (January 2003).

    Recipe #142045

    This salad is one of the suggested side dishes that goes with Roast Salmon with Spiced Coconut Crumbs Roast (Recipe #141533). However, you may want to serve it as a side or starter in combination with other Asian style dishes. I have to admit that I've never followed this recipe exactly, but I often use it as a base.

    Recipe #142046

    This recipe is from 'jamies dinners' by Jamie Oliver. It makes a lovely starter, but can also be served with grilled prawns or satay chicken. Jamie says it's also lovely as a snack inside a wrap or flatbread. Even though the coconut may be a pain to prepare it's well worth it... However, you may also want to use 1 plastic container of fresh coconut pieces. That's what we used, it was probably less than a whole coconut, but I think it was enough. Although I haven't tried watercress yet, I assume it should work just as well. Jamie calls the salad Keralan, but as it contains cress, it isn't really a true salad from there. The recipe was inspired by a friend of his who runs a Indian restaurant in London.

    Recipe #143411

    I served this delicious curry at my 30th birthday. You can use any white fish fillets that keep their shape well. I used economic frozen fish. This recipe will yield a lot of sauce :), so serve over basmati rice. You'll find coconut vinegar in Asian stores. You will need to marinate the fish for at least 30 minutes. It is included in the cooking time. This curry freezes well, but you will have to use fresh fish then.

    Recipe #144206

    This recipe makes wonderful, spicy, roasted squash. It comes from the 'delicious' magazine (november 2004) and appeared together with a very simple roasted ginger chicken. The chicken was a little bit lacking in taste, so I decided not to post it before having the recipe adapted. The squash was lovely, though. I chopped the leftovers and mixed it together with some pan-fried red pepper, chopped flat-leaf parsley, a little bit of olive oil, and lemon juice into couscous which I had cold for lunch. Yummy!

    Recipe #145020

    A nice side dish to Indian meals. The green pepper goes really well with the courgettes. You may think that a pepper of another colour would look nicer, but as I said, the two green vegetables work well together. I've made this twice so far and will make it again. You will get the asafetida from Indian stores, but I left it out when I cooked this the first time and it still turned out lovely. Recipe source is Maduhur Jaffrey's wonderful 'The Ultimate Curry Bible'.

    Recipe #146424

    This tasty chicken needs less preparation than most other Indian chicken dishes I know. There won't be a sauce, therefore I suggest you serve this with a flavoured rice rather than with plain. Together with your favourite raita, this makes a lovely meal. Recipe source is the 'Good Food' magazine November 05. Marinating time of at least 30 minutes and up to 24 hours is not included in the preparation time. Enjoy!

    Recipe #147892

    This recipe by Madhur Jaffrey from her cookbook 'An Invitation to Indian Cooking' is North India's most popular dal, and it's eaten with equal relish by toothless toddlers, husky farmers, and effete urban snobs. You can use white urad dal, the salmnon-colored masoor dal, and the large arhar or tovar dal as well. The roasted whole cumin seeds added at the end gives this dish a nice touch. Serve with plain rice and a vegetable for a simple meal. Most meat and chicken dishes go well with this dal.

    Recipe #153501

    This is a fantastic stir-fry! It serves 3-4 people (or even two big eaters) and I recommend serving it with plain rice. Recipe is adapted from 'The New Best Recipe'. Enjoy!

    Recipe #163119

    A firm favourite. The original recipe (GOOD FOOD April 2000) says it serves 4. However, it serves myself only twice. Ok, I'm a pig... The addition of flour comes from me - it helps to fry the minced meat nicer and to bind the liquid slightly. I've also made a few other minor changes to the original recipe.

    Recipe #165953

    A lovely crunchy salad which takes a bit more time than a simple cucumber salad, but it's really worth it! Goes well as a starter or a side dish with a chinese meal. Cooking time includes leaving the cucumbers in salted water for 20 minutes and standing time (to develop the flavour of the salad) of 2 hours.

    Recipe #167322

    Yummy chinese chicken wings from the beautiful book 'The Complete Asian Cookbook' by Charmaine Solomon.

    Recipe #167698

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