Recipe Sifter

X
  • Start Here
    • Course
    • Main Ingredient
    • Cuisine
    • Preparation
    • Occasion
    • Diet
    • Nutrition
1

Select () or exclude () categories to narrow your recipe search.

2

As you select categories, the number of matching recipes will update.

Make some selections to begin narrowing your results.
  • Calories
  • Amount per serving
    1. Total Fat
    2. Saturated Fat
    3. Polyunsat. Fat
    4. Monounsat. Fat
    5. Trans Fat
  • Cholesterol
  • Sodium
  • Potassium
  • Total Carbohydrates
    1. Dietary Fiber
    2. Sugars
  • Protein
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin B6
  • Vitamin B12
  • Vitamin C
  • Calcium
  • Iron
  • Vitamin E
  • Magnesium
  • Alcohol
  • Caffeine
  • Find exactly what you're looking for with the web's most powerful recipe filtering tool.

    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / Gotta try soon
    Lost? Site Map
    food image

    127 recipes in

    Gotta try soon

    « Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Next »
    Displaying up to 20 pages of results. To see all results, or register.

    Quick hot cocoa in the microwave.

    Recipe #26773

    Wonderful Texas beef brisket rub. A Sufficient amount for a 5-6 pound brisket. I adopted this recipe in September, 2006. I have used it several times and it's wonderful.

    Recipe #79233

    8 Reviews |  By marisk

    I don't eat sardines very often but this is the way my DH taught me to make them...I used to just heat them served over rice with a little soy sauce. This is a lot more flavorful!

    Recipe #223798

    Recipe #60235

    A very simple recipe using my favorite food, soy sauce, for marinating boiled eggs. You can eat these eggs simply sliced or whole. I admit, I love these eggs served simply or in ramen and have them often in my refrigerator for a quick snack. If you like you can add many other ingredients to the marinade such as garlic, gochujang, miso, tobandjan, tenmenjan, tabasco or other hot sauces. These eggs are often served in ramen in Japan. For an authentic Japanese ramen style eggs, boil for 6-7 minutes only for softer yolk.

    Recipe #315722

    Adapted from What's Cooking America.

    Recipe #292639

    This dish has become popular in thailand few years ago, it has a strong peppery flavors which is quite appealing to the thai taste buds...I just had it for lunch so i thought of sharing it with zaar....enjoy!!

    Recipe #142732

    These are the best of the best in old-fashioned pancakes. (Thank you, Halifax Liz for letting me know that your grandmother was making these in Northern Ireland 70 years ago.) It's no wonder a recipe like this has such staying power, they're super easy & make use of on-hand ingredients. The secret to their firm but fluffy texture is using tiny cubes of white bread to support the batter. But you'll never know they're in there! I've been making this recipe for about 10 years now & I like to serve these pancakes with jams, maple syrup & my homemade syrup from Recipe #22066. I also usually double the recipe if there is more than just the 3 of us eating. The recipe was found in "Pancakes A to Z", one of the three books in my favorite cookbook series by Marie Simmons and there titled "Rux's Family's Favorite Pancakes". My family simply dubbed them "Special Pancakes" and even though it doesn't take a special day to make them, they make ANY day feel special.

    Recipe #380167

    6 Reviews |  By Geema

    The combination of fresh asparagus and crunchy, salty cashews is a winner. As a side vegetable it goes well with simple grilled fish, pork, and poultry. Or, I've just sauteed some cubed, boneless chicken breasts to the skillet before adding the asparagus. It's delicious either way.

    Recipe #63469

    From Aaron McCargo's Dishes with Dad episode, this is so good!

    Recipe #389232

    My Mom and I created this after being stationed in Japan and eating Yakisoba from the street vendors. This is not exactly the same-but a good substitute

    Recipe #29968

    From Cooking Light, Jan/Feb 2009. This has 3 points per 1/2 cup serving for those of you using Weight Watchers.

    Recipe #350245

    In 1921, a German born clockmaker quit his well respected job to open a popcorn stand in Chicago’s Wicker Park District. The clockmaker’s typical fare was freshly popped popcorn drizzled with warm butter and sprinkled with salt; but his favorite, and most beloved popcorn, was his caramel coated popcorn. The recipe he used to make it was given to him from his only true love, who tragically died four years earlier during World War I. The tattered and torn recipe, which was scribbled on the inside of an old playbill, was carefully framed and sealed in an exquisite frame. The clockmaker faithfully took the framed recipe with him everywhere he went. By the summer of 1924, the clockmaker’s caramel coated popcorn had captivated the entire city’s attention; everyone was frantically lining up at his busy stand to buy the sweet, sticky confection. A few months later, just as the clockmaker was preparing to close his stand for the day, a small fire ignited near the stove. The clockmaker instinctively ran out to call for help. When he returned, just seconds later, he remembered leaving the framed recipe hanging on the wall. The clockmaker quickly ran into the burning stand to retrieve the recipe, but he never made it out. When the fire inspectors went into the charred ruins to investigate the accident, they found the clockmaker’s frame lying in a pile of smoking debris. The frame was in pristine condition; not a dent, nor a blemish, could be seen on it. However, the recipe was gone. The recipe for the clockmaker’s caramel popcorn recently surfaced and is beginning to circulate around the globe. Unfortunately, many people think the recipe is haunted because it is believed that if your clock stops running after making the recipe it’s because the clockmaker has paid you a visit in hopes of reclaiming his long, lost recipe. NOTE: This recipe, as written, results in a sticky, chewy caramel popcorn. If you prefer a crunchier caramel popcorn, bake it in the oven at 250 degrees for 1 hour, stirring every 15 minutes.

    Recipe #181870

    This is as close as I have gotten to the mussels my sister and I got addicted to in Italy this summer. All the recipes I've seen so far lack something, but there are a few distinct flavors: white wine, garlic, olive oil+sea salt or butter. No tomatoes! I could eat this everyday. Make sure you have a nice thick slice of crusty-ish bread on the bottom or side of the bowl, plus tons more for dipping in the leftover steaming liquid!

    Recipe #256610

    This is shojin ryori or vegetarian temple cooking, a Buddhist vegetarian style of cooking in Japan. There are many versions of blunt knife pounded cucumber salads but this one is very nice. Often cucumber is pounded with a blunt side of a chef's knife or small stick lightly to break down the cucumber flesh in the middle so that cucumbers can be eaten in bigger chunks and flavor able to penetrate better. Japanese, English, or hot house cucumbers work best here, but if using thick skinned American style cucumber, cut in lengthwise in half and remove seeds first before proceeding.

    Recipe #343365

    27 Reviews |  By surus

    Part of our annual trek to the mountains is cooking out streamside. This year I decided to try salmon and found this recipe on another site. I scaled it back to feed 2 and marinated the fish for about 6 hours. It was spectacular. You can baste the fish while it's cooking if you wish, but not necessary. We used a grill basket and oiled it first to prevent sticking.

    Recipe #63080

    From Donna Hay's "Flavours"

    Recipe #90485

    I put the dry ingredients into baggies and store several baggies in the cupboard. All I have to do in the morning is add the wet ingredients and bake while I am doing my animal chores and I have an amazingly filling breakfast.

    Recipe #158087

    There's nothing better than starting your Sunday morning with a batch of warm and fluffy Chocolate Banana Pancakes. And if you are one of those who likes to watch your calories, try this version made with whole wheat flour, fresh bananas and some sweetened cocoa powder. A bit of yogurt or skim milk adds the perfect light and fluffy texture you need, and a dusting of powdered sugar, a dollop of butter and some old-fashioned syrup or some homemade fresh-fruit sauce will truly help you get the best out of your breakfast deal. Got this, description, and all, from foodandfuncafe.com

    Recipe #381764

    Don't you just love that kettle cooked popcorn available at county fairs? It's sweet; it's salty; it's deliciously crunchy. It's usually pretty expensive too! This is a great, SUPER EASY recipe to make it yourself - just like you enjoy at the fair - with only 3 ingredients! I ran across a similar recipe years ago online and tweaked it a bit... in other words, perfected it. I hope you enjoy!

    Recipe #359110

    « Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Next »
    Displaying up to 20 pages of results. To see all results, or register.
    Advertisement

    Free Weekly Newsletter

    Get the latest recipes and tips delivered right to your inbox.

    Your e-mail is safe. Privacy Policy
    Advertisement

    Food.com Network of Sites

    • Mexican Recipes
    • Chinese Recipes
    • Australian Recipes
    • Breakfast Recipes
    • Greek Recipes
    • Restaurant Recipes
    • Italian Recipes
    • Christmas Recipes
    • Thanksgiving Recipes
    • Southern Recipes
    • Dessert Recipes
    • Deep Fried Recipes
    • Thai Recipes
    • Low Cholesterol Recipes
    • Indian Recipes
    • Healthy Recipes
    • Meatloaf Recipes