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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / Breads: Bread as a Magic Carpet
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    110 recipes in

    Breads: Bread as a Magic Carpet

    [Cover photo by kiwidutch... .] Breads from cuisines around the world.
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    From Istanbul originally, this recipe appears in "A Blessing of Bread" by Maggie Glezer. Perfect with a cup of coffee or tea. The 4-hr time indicated is really from start to finish. There is probably about 30-45 minutes of active work during that time, depending on how quick you are.

    Recipe #276418

    This bread is from Bernard Clayton's Complete Book of Breads. According to the book, this recipe originated in 1859 from a baker named Robbie Douglas, in the Scottish town of Selkirk, near Edinburgh. Looks like one for raisin lovers! Submitting for Zaar World Tour III - I confess I have not made this one yet, but will try to do so soon.

    Recipe #231108

    This naan is from the New Vegetarian Epicure. With just four ingredients and no yeast, it is simple to mix up, but it is so soft and flavorful I figured I'd add it to the many recipes already posted. Prep time does not include 1 hour of "resting."

    Recipe #203261

    Great with a cup of black coffee. This is my friend's grandmother's recipe. Mixed peel is the candied peel of various fruit. Use candied orange peel or candied papaya peel or a combination of the two.

    Recipe #190905

    My son has been making tortillas for several years. This is his 'tweaked' Joy of Cooking recipe. So much better than store bought tortillas!

    Recipe #180143

    1 Reviews |  By Rita~

    18th century recipe for exotic, eastern spicy bread. Mulot au Petitjean is an old fashioned shop in Dijon that specialises in Spice bread. The Mulot family have been producing this bread on the same site since 1838 and is the only spice bread producer left. Recipe courtesy of Anne Willian tweeked. TAKE NOTE: that the spice bread should be slightly under baked so it is soft in the middle and has not started to shrink from the sides of the pan. Let the breads cool and then turn them out.

    Recipe #176828

    This is a common recipe here in Newfoundland. There's nothing like homemade raisin bread. I got this recipe from Newfoundland site. It did not call for cinnamon, but raisin bread is not the same without the cinnamon.The recipe says it makes 3 loaves but I think it could make 4.Making 3 tends to yield large loaves.

    Recipe #168819

    This is a very delicious bread my ex gf who is Mayan/Mexican had this recipe from her mother who got it from her great grandma who was Mayan:) anyways this is very delicious:) I hope you enjoy it as much as I did

    Recipe #164868

    1 Reviews |  By Mrs B

    Damper is a traditional hard crusted Australian bread. This recipe makes 14 individual mini Dampers, or Damperettes. The recipe comes from the Australian Women’s Weekly cookbook “Muffins, Scones and Breads”. Recipe posted for Zaar World Tour 2005. NOTE: Australian chefs use a larger tablespoon measure so they will only need 2 tbsps of ready-made seeded or grainy mustard.

    Recipe #143080

    1 Reviews |  By Mrs B

    Damper is a traditional Australian bread. There are probably as many variations as there are people to cook it! This recipe comes from the Australian Women’s Weekly cookbook “Muffins, Scones and Breads”. This is a very useful recipe for those times when you want to make bread, but don't have time to use yeast. Damper has a hard crust and a fairly close texture. Its not a light bread (not the sort of bread you'd use to make dainty cucumber sandwiches, for example!), but it is tasty and is also good toasted. I have found various surces of information about Damper on the internet and learned that originally Damper would have been cooked in the ashes of a bush fire. The ashes were flattened and the Damper was placed there to cook for 10 minutes. Then the Damper was covered with ashes and coked for another 20-30 minutes. The Damper was cooked until it sounded hollow when tapped. This recipe was posted for Zaar World Tour 2005.

    Recipe #143076

    Posted for the World Zaar Tour 2005.

    Recipe #143066

    I found this vintage recipe on the Internet while looking for unique recipes to submit for the Zaar World Tour. It comes from the recipe files of Margaret Dens Buytaert, a Belgain who resided in Wisconsin. The idea of coffee as the liquid in this quick bread intrigues me. Sorry that I will not have a chance to prepare it for a while. If you try it, please share your reactions.

    Recipe #140852

    19 Reviews |  By Rita~

    This soft, spongy flat bread is used instead of utensils to scoop up a stew or vegetables. It is traditionally made with teff flour, a type of millet grown in Ethiopia. If you can't find teff you can substitute buckwheat or wheat flour, as this recipe does. The batter is usually treated as sourdough - a small portion saved from each recipe and allowed to ferment, then added to the new batter next time injera is made. This recipe uses baking soda and club soda to produce the same bubbly effect.

    Recipe #140763

    4 Reviews |  By LAURIE

    From Africa....posted for the Zaar World Tour.

    Recipe #139871

    This is a well loved and easily prepared bread from Morocco. This bread originally belongs to the peasants of the Rif where I live; the Atlas Mountains, coastal, where the people are known as Rifi/Rifia . Always served with butter, you can also use honey, cinnamon, sugar or a combo of these but always butter. This is best made at home and unless one knows their street vendors it can be very disappointing as street food. This bread can be served hot, warm or room temperature but always best on day of making. You can make these anywhere from 2" galettes or skillet size. I often make it skillet size and cut into wedges. c.2005

    Recipe #137110

    This is a Moroccan flaky flat almost crepe like bread. Best eaten warm it is well loved here for breakfast with butter, sugar, honey, cinnamon, ground almonds or a combination of these. As street food it is nearly always delicious and made at home is even better! We also stuff these with sweet mixtures such as roughly ground almonds and sugar or honey and love them stuffed savory with onions, parsley, tomato and if I have any, leftover crumbled Hajar's Zweena Beef Kefta or a combination. The beef is certainly not obiligatory!! Be careful to oil, oil, oil, your hands and surfaces well! I have worn M'semmen many times due to lack of oil. I can still remember the smile on Mohamed's face when I told him that I made m'semmen long before coming to Morocco. For more info, visit the African Forum where I have a column and others make wonderful contributions! c.2005

    Recipe #137003

    7 Reviews |  By GaylaJ

    Adapted from one of my favorite cookbooks, The Bread Baker's Apprentice (by Peter Reinhart), this recipe makes lovely sweet, light loaves. Prep time includes time for fermentation and proofing of the sponge and the dough. This bread will start browning rather quickly, due to the high sugar content, but don't be alarmed - it will get even darker as the center catches up with the outside, and the final color will be a rich mahogany brown.

    Recipe #136792

    Adapted from the cookbook Big Book of Bread Machine Recipes. I make this *dense* (meaning not high rising) bread in the cold months and serve with a hearty stew or soup. Not too sour a loaf of bread either as some black bread can be.

    Recipe #135288

    36 Reviews |  By Zurie

    This is the perfect road food, fisherman's lunch, school lunch bread, breakfast ... I can't be without this recipe, given to me long ago by a friend. It definitely does not need butter -- just slice and eat. Please note that this does not pretend to be a low-fat recipe! It is meant for long days away from home, when one slice means sustenance.

    Recipe #133908

    4 Reviews |  By blucoat

    Chinese bread dough is quite sweet compared with Western breads (the further south you go in China, the sweeter the dough becomes). Most Chinese breads are steamed, which is why they look pale and uncooked to the Western eye. This can be made plain or used for chinese buns (bao). The buns can be filled with a variety of fillings, such as custard, mung bean paste, or BBQed meat. Be creative!

    Recipe #129368

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