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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / LIBYA 10/2012
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    LIBYA 10/2012

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    This recipe originated in North Africa near Tripoli and not far from the Gulf of Sidra which is the Almond-growing area of Africa. From African Cookery by Annette Merson. Posted for ZWT6.

    Recipe #422425

    4 Reviews |  By Nasseh

    I found this Lebanese recipe in a Mediterranean cookbook & thought it would be delicious.

    Recipe #308420

    Good source recipe for calcium. This recipe can be serviced with potatoes or rice.

    Recipe #164646

    4 Reviews |  By Mirj

    Basboosa are thin semolina squares covered in a honey and lemon syrup. Very Middle Eastern, this goes great with some sweet Turkish coffee or some mint tea.

    Recipe #74312

    So many versions of this exist and I have tried them all.. This northern middleeast version (syria-lebanon-jordan) doesn't use eggs and so tastes less cake like. This is my favourite version and it is the classic one! I only use one heaped cup of coarse ground semolina, to make thin squares.

    Recipe #329404

    This Libyan dish has been posted in response to a Round the World game. Looks tasty and a candidate for the crockpot as well. This could readily be made vegetarian by substituting dried bean curd or tempeh for the meat.

    Recipe #50394

    A Lebanese Orange Custard with Caramel, which I'm posting for the 2005 Zaar World Tour, adapted from a recipe in from the Bay Books' publication: 'The Best of Lebanese and Middle Eastern Cooking'. This dessert can be eaten warm or chilled.

    Recipe #141391

    Thick and warming this unusual mint-laced soup is a real winner especially if served with toasted pita and hummus to dip it in!

    Recipe #413845

    Try serving thisalongside your favourite tagine or spicy vegetable soups with pita to dip.

    Recipe #358707

    Adopted! I was born and raised in a small village where most of the residesnt depended on their farm animals for their livelyhood. Our meat was mainly pork and chicken with an occasional pound of hamburger boutht at the butcher shop. Young calves were seldom eaten. The were shipped to market for cash. In those days, a young calf would bring about $75 which would buy a lot of school shoes. When I left home and started to work, I ate mainly in restaurants. I soon loved to enjoy the taste of lamb. In later years I was dining in a restaurant in North Africa, when a diner near me who had just ordered leg of lamb queried the waiter, "Did you know that if you fixed a turkey leg in this manner that it would taste just leg of lamb?" "Yes," the waiter replied, "That's what that is." When I was able to find two turkey legs in the bazaar, I bought them and took them back to my apartment and cooked them basically like this recipe. He was right they did taste just like curried log of lamb and at about a quarter of the price. I have been eating them ever since. I am happy to post this recipe because I know every who likes lamb will enjoy it immensely.

    Recipe #68078

    Qatayif are made throughout the Arab world in Ramadan, and at no other time. The origins of these stuffed and fried pancakes, like the traditional Ramadan lantern go back to medieval Cairo. The filling can be either sweet cheese or nuts and raisins. This is the nut filling version flavored with orange blossom water and cinnamon. Found on Libyan Food.

    Recipe #486875

    4 Reviews |  By tabbakh

    this recipe is real easy. My mother in law came to visit once from jordan and ever since my husband refuses to eat toast. but hey! i usually do the dough at night and bake it in the morning. but you dont need to leave it so much. just make sure the oven is real hot and dont open it too much.

    Recipe #209486

    This Italian and Libyan- influenced dish is great to serve in the summer months.

    Recipe #317633

    Bold North african flavors stand up to even the heartiest of hot dogs. Pile the dogs high with spicy harissa or sambal oelek flavored carmalized onions' a bright, pleasantly bitter preserved lemon relish; and just a bit of hummus. ** from Bon Appetit I used sambal oelek and i used mint from my garden that i froze and then defrosted a bit... It worked.

    Recipe #389661

    This is a common seasoning in Libya. I was surprised that there isn't a recipe for it on zaar (though it could have another name...I'm certainly no expert). I found this recipe online (http://www.celtnet.org.uk/recipes/miscellaneous/fetch-recipe.php?rid=misc-hararat). I must admit that I have never made this before - and that this particular recipe is a bit annoying as you have to grind everything in a spice/coffee grinder or I suppose a mortar and pestle if you're ambitious. I am posting a different version that uses pre-ground spices. Feel free to multiply this recipe to make any amount you wish.

    Recipe #352799

    This is another hararat recipe. I found this online as well (http://morselsandmusings.blogspot.com/2008/03/sharba-libiya.html - this website has a lovely looking soup recipe accompanying the spice blend). This one is easier to make than version 1, because the spices are already ground, thus you don't need a spice or coffee grinder. The spices are dry fried or toasted to release the flavours! Be sure NOT to add any oil.

    Recipe #352805

    This is a way to make pomegranate molasses if you do not have access to a middle eastern grocery store, but can get pomegranate juice.

    Recipe #86849

    4 Reviews |  By Charmed

    This is a recipe for homemade tahini from The Frugal Gourmet Cooks Three Ancient Cuisines NOTE: Since I have not made this, I could not tell you what the amount it yields is. The recipe says 4 servings, but I don't know what that is based on.

    Recipe #92742

    I don't know if this is Libyan or Tunisian, but its a delicious North African way of cooking fish. This is also great cold. I used to cook this a lot on Sundays and bring the leftovers to work on Monday. People's mouths would water when I heated it up in the microwave.

    Recipe #159016

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