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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / I'm just mad about Saffron, Saffron's mad about me
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    107 recipes in

    I'm just mad about Saffron, Saffron's mad about me

    [Cover photo by Varsha.] Saffron, sold as either threads or powder, has a pungent, slightly bittersweet taste, which is quite intense, so that very little is needed in cooking. This is lucky because it is the world's most expensive spice (over $200 per ounce). There are several reasons for this: saffron threads are the dried stigmas of the saffron crocus, each of which contains only three threads; the threads must be picked by hand; more than 75,000 flowers are required just to produce 1 lb of saffron filaments; and it has a relatively brief autumn harvesting season. Saffron is grown mainly in Iran and Spain and, in smaller amounts, in Greece, Italy, Turkey and India (the saffron of Kashmir, the most prized of all, is now mostly unavailable in the West). Most saffron sold in the U.S. is from Spain. Because so little is used in a dish, it is important that saffron be well distributed throughout the dish. The spice may simply be crumbled into sauces and soups. For other dishes, it works better to first dissolve the saffron in a small amount of liquid such as water or stock and then add to the dish. It can also be toasted before using. A pinch of saffron (1 pinch = 1/8 tsp) contains about 20 threads, and 1/2 tsp threads = 1/4 tsp saffron powder. Like most seasonings, the flavor of saffron diminishes over time, but if stored in a container with a tight lid in a cool, dry place it will keep at least 3 years; threads retain their flavor longer than powder.
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    3 Reviews |  By Derf

    Chicken provencal, Great chicken dish, full of flavour! Recipe evolved to our taste from "French Country Kitchen" by Ann Hughes-Gilbey

    Recipe #13137

    Chickpeas are so good done in this simple pilaf. This is 'wetter' than a regular pilaf as this type of cooking in Greece closely resembles a risotto.

    Recipe #60348

    2 Reviews |  By Olha

    The food of La Mancha is hearty, and this stew is simplicity itself. It is sometimes called tonjunto, meaning "everything is thrown all together." Serve with crusty bread.

    Recipe #91534

    1 Reviews |  By Olha

    This colorful dish is lovely for entertaining. You can present the fish on a large warm platter and let people take what they like. Serve with rice pilaf, tossed salad, and a pitcher of Sangria.

    Recipe #180614

    Farm -raised snails are a burgeoning industry in New South Wales, and this is one way they are served at Lolli Redini, Simonn Hawke's restaurant in Orange. You can buy the fresh pasta--though it's quite simple to make--and cut considerable time off prep. You can also substitute fresh baby spinach for the sorrel, which is hard to find outside of farmers' markets.

    Recipe #138733

    28 Reviews |  By Rita~

    A very fragrant Indian side dish! I just love the cardamom! Ghee can be bought in any supermaket if you want check out my recipe to make it. Check out this thread http://www.recipezaar.com/bb/viewtopic.zsp?t=226770 on step x step pictures to make this.

    Recipe #55617

    From the book, "From Chilis to Chutneys" Preparation time includes the time it takes to toast the nuts and puree the fruit. The soaking, thawing, freezing and setting time counts as the cooking time.

    Recipe #169216

    A classic Moroccan dish which strikes a balance between sweet and savoury flavourings - and sounds absolutely delicious. I'm posting it here for safekeeping: so I don't forget it! To achieve the balance that best suits your tastes, start with one tablespoon of honey and add more until it’s just how you like it. Adapted from Claudia Roden’s recipe in the August/September 2005 issue of ‘Australian Vogue Entertaining + Travel’. Claudia Roden's recipe uses a whole chicken. When I make this recipe, I intend using skinless, boneless breasts, halved. Served over rice, noodles, or couscous, I think this recipe would easily serve 6 rather than the 4 specified. After I've made it, I’ll post the cooking times for making this recipe with breasts, and any other adjustments in relation to the number of serves. If you make this recipe - with breasts or thighs - before I do, please include in your review your cooking times and how many serves it made.

    Recipe #132295

    This dish came from an old cookbook call" The Cooking of Italy" I have not made it as yet, but I am storing it here for future use.

    Recipe #158003

    This is an ancient recipe! The word "zaafrani" means "Saffron" or what we call "Kesar" in Hindi. In my home, we use this in plenty during the winter/cooler months. The word "murg" is the Hindi equivalent for "Chicken". This delicious recipe was telecast at 11:30am Oman time on this Sunday on Mirch Masala, Star Plus. It was cooked by a chef in Jaipur who has been cooking since he was a young boy. Now, he's an old man with a long white moustache, a pot belly and a beaming smile! This chicken looked so yummy while he was cooking it in his pot on TV, I can't wait to try it, I will be doing that very soon! Join me, will you? :)

    Recipe #49365

    3 Reviews |  By chia

    this is a wonderful vegetarian dish when fresh produce is in season. i adapted this from barilla.

    Recipe #66122

    Years ago I was married to a Portuguese girl for 12 years, and this is a dish her mother used to make.

    Recipe #148361

    From the magazine Cooking Pleasures. A fancy side dish for your Thanksgiving meal.

    Recipe #144572

    12 Reviews |  By Sudika

    This is a recipe from Kurma Das, the world best vegetarian cook. I can vouch for this dessert, it is TO DIE FOR. To many aficionados of Hare Krishna cooking worldwide, halava rates on top of the list of their favourite dishes. It's hot, buttery, sweet, flavoursome and completely satisfying, especially on a cold winter's day. In this recipe, the humble semolina teams up with the world's two most expensive spices - saffron and cardamom. Enriched with sultanas and flaked almonds, serve fluffy, plump grained halava hot with cream, custard, or as is for an epicurian experience.

    Recipe #141371

    2 Reviews |  By chia

    this quick easy recipe comes from jean georges vongerichten

    Recipe #71898

    Another wonderful Andreas Viestad recipe, one of few for chicken. He adapted this one from a medieval Icelandic cookbook; the spices indicate that it probably was a dish for the wealthy. Amazingly, the amount of cinnamon is not overpowering here, and the dish is best with "skin-on" chicken. If you don't like chicken livers, substitute 1/2 chicken bouillon cube. Prep time includes a day of marinating (if you choose that option).

    Recipe #120648

    This recipe comes from a Moroccan cookbook that I once found in a bargain book shop. You can either use the grill on your oven or BBQ them. They are really tasty and served with green salad they make a light meal. The coriander in this recipe refers to fresh leaves/cilantro, not the seeds. The preparation time includes time for marinating, otherwise it would only be about 15 minutes.

    Recipe #97492

    South Africa's oldest rice dish is vendusierys (auction rice) which was later known as huweliksrys (wedding rice) or begrafnisrys (funeral rice). It is simply yellow rice with raisins.

    Recipe #11409

    8 Reviews |  By Mirj

    I got this from an Armenian girl who works in my bank. If you substitute margarine for the butter you have a good vegan meal.

    Recipe #14745

    One of my mom's signature, no-fail recipes, this pudding (or kheer as it is called here in India) is really simple to make, with the most easily available ingredients (but not saffron, I agree!). Enjoy :-)

    Recipe #19226

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