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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / ZWT #5 Caribbean
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    15 recipes in

    ZWT #5 Caribbean


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    An easy, simple way to fix rice from the Caribbean island of Aruba! Great served with a lettuce and tomato salad.

    Recipe #232622

    From Emeril Lagasse Emeril Live show, this has gotten great reviews! This is served at the Marley Cafe in Orlando, Florida. This is traditionally served with cucumber sauce and yucca fries(you can sub french fries). I have given the recipe for the sauce. Prep time includes marinating overnight. This is also popular in Florida.

    Recipe #231658

    From All About Cuban Cooking cookbook, this is a simple and tasty salad.

    Recipe #231841

    Jicama is a round root vegetable with brown skin that has a crisp, slightly sweet taste. Adapted from Vegetarian Times magazine!

    Recipe #145997

    I just love mango and this goes together so nicely! You can use fresh or frozen mango and fresh or canned pineapple. Adding a banana is good too and makes it a smoothie! UPDATE: Due to reviews I have changed the ingredient pineapple chunks to crushed pineapple to help eliminate stringiness. :)

    Recipe #303968

    I got this lovely dish off a Walmart card by the fish department! Lucky me!

    Recipe #143775

    I have not made this, but I dream of a balmy day in Jamaica, stopping at a roadside stand and eating this. The saltcod needs to soak overnight, so start this the day before eating. Good for breakfast or brunch with crackers, or even a party snack! Adapted from Bon Appetit. Enjoy!

    Recipe #270465

    A sandwich that originated in Cuba! Yum! Adapted from Cooking Light magazine.

    Recipe #178556

    Sweet red bell peppers are simmered with garlic, ginger, sugar and orange juice and zest to create a slightly sweet condiment with a bite to it! This is great with grilled chicken or beef, lamb, on a sandwich[try this topped with a fried egg on multi- grain bread], in a potato, or with game. Try to always have some on hand-it's addictive. From The New Basics Cookbook.

    Recipe #133594

    A great day starter from BH&G! Papaya Tips: Choose papayas that are partly yellow and feel slightly soft when pressed. The skin should be smooth and free from bruises or very soft spots. A firm, unripe papaya can be ripened at room temperature for 3 to 5 days until mostly yellow to yellowish orange in color. Store a ripe papaya in a paper or plastic bag in the refrigerator for up to 1 week. English, Australian, Caribbean, Italian, Native American, Southern USA, Mexican, Spanish catagories. "Doubtless God could have made a better berry, but doubtless God never did." (Dr. William Butler, 17th Century English Writer) Dr. Butler is referring to the strawberry. Strawberries are the best of the berries. The delicate heart-shaped berry has always connoted purity, passion and healing. It has been used in stories, literature and paintings through the ages. In Othello, Shakespeare decorated Desdemonda's handkerchief with symbolic strawberries. Madame Tallien, a prominent figure at the court of the Emperor Napoleon, was famous for bathing in the juice of fresh strawberries. She used 22 pounds per basin, needless to say, she did not bathe daily. In parts of Bavaria, country folk still practice the annual rite each spring of tying small baskets of wild strawberries to the horns of their cattle as an offering to elves. They believe that the elves, who are passionately fond of strawberries, will help to produce healthy calves and abundance of milk in return. The American Indians were already eating strawberries when the Colonists arrived. The crushed berries were mixed with cornmeal and baked into strawberry bread. After trying this bread, Colonists developed their own version of the recipe and Strawberry Shortcake was created. In Greek and Roman times, the strawberry was a wild plant. The English "strawberry" comes from the Anglo-Saxon "streoberie" not spelled in the modern fashion until 1538. The first documented botanical illustration of a strawberry plant appeared as a figure in Herbaries in 1454. In 1780, the first strawberry hybrid "Hudson" was developed in the United States. Legend has it that if you break a double strawberry in half and share it with a member of the opposite sex, you will fall in love with each other. The strawberry was a symbol for Venus, the Goddess of Love, because of its heart shapes and red color. Queen Anne Boleyn, the second wife of Henry VIII had a strawberry shaped birthmark on her neck, which some claimed proved she was a witch. To symbolize perfection and righteousness, medieval stone masons carved strawberry designs on altars and around the tops of pillars in churches and cathedrals. The wide distribution of wild strawberries is largely from seeds sown by birds. It seems that when birds eat the wild berries the seeds pass through them intact and in reasonably good condition. The germinating seeds respond to light rather than moisture and therefore need no covering of earth to start growing. Medicinal Uses The strawberry, a member of the rose family, is unique in that it is the only fruit with seeds on the outside rather than the inside. Many medicinal uses were claimed for the wild strawberry, its leaves and root. The ancient Romans believed that the berries alleviated symptoms of melancholy, fainting, all inflammations, fevers, throat infections, kidney stones, halitosis, attacks of gout, and diseases of the blood, liver and spleen.

    Recipe #178254

    This is an Asian inspired recipe courtesy of Bobby Flay in Boy Meets Grill.

    Recipe #226047

    This recipe for jerk sauce is courtesy of Ray's Hideaway Restaurant and Taxi Stand, Montego Bay, Jamaica. It's fiery, but not incendiary, full of flavor, and worth the effort to make it. I got the recipe from The Early Show on CBS. The chicken needs to marinate 4-8 hours so start early. :D

    Recipe #331869

    This is a great way to introduce children to new fruits! So simple! From Baby Center. This is an Australian recipe, also Caribbean, Mexican and Southern recipe!

    Recipe #164077

    A summer classic, this is cool and refreshing! For a sweeter, less tangy drink, use pineapple canned in syrup rather than its own juice. Southwest, Southern and Mexican recipe.

    Recipe #163176

    Go ahead, buy that watermelon, and use it to make these delicious drinks! Adapted from Easy Entertaining.

    Recipe #160642


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