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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / ZWT5 Kitchen Witches France/Cajun/Creole
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    119 recipes in

    ZWT5 Kitchen Witches France/Cajun/Creole

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    Sinfully delicious! Found this recipe in my America's Test Kitchen's Family Cookbook. Prepare the casserole the night before and add the topping just before baking. Great way to use up your leftover homemade bread. As you can see this is one of those 'splurge' recipes . . . . do not make substitutes! Time indicated includes soaking. This recipe can easily be cut in half to serve four!!

    Recipe #360180

    Based on a recipe from Michelle Garner’s cookbook, Quick French Cuisine. She says, “I adapted this from my aunt Cécille’s recipe. She would make large batches and freeze it.”

    Recipe #288059

    Based on a recipe from Stuart Walton's book, The Ultimate Book of Cocktails. He says, "This very French cocktail is intended, unexpectedly, as a tribute to the car manufacturer. Owners of their cars may justifiably drink it with pride, though not of course immediately before driving anywhere as it's quite strong."

    Recipe #288082

    Based on a recipe from Lydie Marchall's cookbook, Slow-Cooked Comfort. She says of this recipe, "A well-made white sauce (bechamel in French, besciamella in Italian) is a wonderful binder for many...casseroles.... I flavor the sauce with a small onion and nutmeg. For the best result, I prepare the sauce when I need it."

    Recipe #334376

    This is a great recipe based on one served at the Axe Mill tavern in East Douglas, Massachusetts as presented in the R.S.V.P. section of Bon Appetit's December 1996 magazine. I tried this at home, unfortunately, not yet at the restaurant! We do keep moving closer to it as I made it when I lived in California, and now I'm in Maine. Special note in the article: "Tasso, a spiced smoked Creole ham, and capocollo, a cured Italian sausage, are available at specialty foods stores."

    Recipe #341241

    Based on a wonderful recipe from McCall's Cooking School, Meat #22. The intro says, "Lamb and beans the French way. To most Americans, accustomed to pork with their beans, lamb with white beans is an unusual combination. But it's an everyday meal to the French, particularly those from Brittany. The beans are cooked until tender, combined with garlic, onion, herbs and plum tomatoes, then cooked again for several hours with the lamb. We like our roast lamb fairly well done, while the French prefer it pink. A meat thermometer is a great help in roasting it to just the right degree."

    Recipe #349558

    This is a great recipe based on one from Emeril Lagasse's book, Louisiana Real & Rustic. He says, "Believe it or not, this now-familiar crawfish dish was not known beyond Louisiana until the late 1940s or early 1950s when the oil boom brought an influx of outsiders to Acadiana, and in particular to Breaux Bridge, in St. Martin Parish, now home of the world-famous crawfish festival. It was in this small town on Bayou Teche, or so some food historians tell us, that crawfish etouffee originated. At the time it was unfashionable, except for Acadians, to eat mudbugs. Now just about the whole world flocks to Breaux Bridge for the rich, full flavors of etouffee. Serve it with steamed rice." Since crawfish can be difficult to find in our parts, I've occassionally substituted lobster, in which case, I cook the shells in water and use this water in place of the plain water called for in the recipe.

    Recipe #367568

    These are terrific, some would even say, "romantic". From the November 1989 issue of Bon Appetit. I serve this over linguine.

    Recipe #268755

    Nice. Based on a recipe from the June 1988 issue of Bon Appetit, the R.S.V.P section. It hails from The Falls Terrace restaurant in Tumwater, Washington. It says it can be easily halved.

    Recipe #268772

    This is from the May 1987 issue of the incredible magazine, Chocolatier.

    Recipe #269281

    This is a hot sandwich based on Carole Handslip's recipe from her book, Step-by-Step 50 Great Sandwiches. I make these for either breakfast, brunch, or lunch.

    Recipe #271280

    This is based on a recipe from The Encyclopedia of Creative Cooking, edited by Charlotte Turgeon.

    Recipe #273984

    This roast is based on a recipe from The Encyclopedia of Creative Cooking, edited by Charlotte Turgeon. Allow time for the beef to marinate 12 to 24 hours. Tip: I find it easy to peel tomatoes by filling a small deep saucepan with water, bring to a boil, remove from heat, and plunging a tomato held up with a fork into the water, slow-counting to ten; the skin comes off easily without cooking the tomato.

    Recipe #280211

    This beverage is based on a recipe from Stuart Walton’s book, The Ultimate Book of Cocktails. He says, “Another 1920's recipe that nicely balances the sweetness of blackcurrant liqueur with the acerbic dryness of good dry French vermouth.” Don't forget to eat the currants as you finish off your drink! :)

    Recipe #282738

    Based on a recipe from Michelle Garner’s cookbook, Quick French Cuisine. I’ve been making these appetizers for years and they are always a smash hit. I hope they are for you, too!

    Recipe #284353

    This is from Quick French Cuisine by Michelle Garner. This is tres simple and healthy!

    Recipe #302886

    Recipe #181961

    She got this recipe while we lived in Louisiana, during my early childhood. It was love at first bite. The only thing that changed over time was how much cayenne pepper I used on it. If you just lightly spice it during cooking, then everyone can add their own cayenne pepper at the table.

    Recipe #181978

    I really like the flavor imparted from the beef broth, instead of more dairy from cream or milk, as is usually found with scalloped potatoes.

    Recipe #182033

    So simple, it's hardly a recipe, but the combination of a little chocolate and peanut butter in the morning is very satisfying. The idea for doing this came from having read about French schoolchildren often eating a piece of chocolate between pieces of bread. It wasn't far to go to add peanut butter for some protein.

    Recipe #184351

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