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From a recipe by Michele Humes at Serious Eats. This recipe uses recipe #367037, recipe #367040 and recipe #367039. _Mantou_, or Chinese steamed buns, can be found in the freezer section of most Asian grocery stores. You can also add kimchi to the sandwich as an optional condiment (RZ doesn't recognize it as an ingredient).

Recipe #367188

Adapted from a recipe by Michele Humes at Serious Eats. She says, "Use your favorite chili sauce—preferably one with a thicker consistency, such as Sriracha, as a runnier sauce will thin out your aïoli. You can also use cayenne pepper, but the aïoli will be paler in color."

Recipe #367039

All the flavors of classic French onion soup, wrapped in a wonton skin. Adapted from a recipe by Kerry Saretsky at Serious Eats. If you can't find Gruyère, substitute Comté, Emmenthaler or even American-made Swiss. You can use any 3 largish onions. You can see a photo example of beggar's purses here: http://tinyurl.com/dyp6ck

Recipe #366497

From Simply Recipes (http://tinyurl.com/6nec9b) as recommended by @davidlebovitz. Feel free to substitute mozzarella for the Fontina; you could also sub gorgonzola for part of the cheese. Do be sure to use an Italian Fontina, not a Danish; they are quite different cheeses!

Recipe #364883

Adapted from a recipe by Kerry Saretsky at Serious Eats http://tinyurl.com/d7b834 - "The sweet-tart tang of barbecue sauce seemed the perfect vehicle for fruity, very sweet, very tart pomegranate molasses. Mixed with ketchup, fresh thyme, onion, sugar, and vinegar, the pomegranate molasses doesn't get lost in the mix, nor does it overpower. It adds this detectable, but unplaceable, sweet bite in the background of this tangier than tangy barbecue sauce, negotiating the tight-rope balance between sweet and tart that every barbecue sauce must walk. I smothered it onto spareribs, but I also dipped rotisserie chicken in it, and I know this sauce would go perfectly with barbecued pork ribs, chicken, salmon, or Portobello mushrooms."

Recipe #363279

This is a delicious way to start the day. This is a low GI recipe so great for those trying to eat healthy or for diabetics. I love to use braeburn apples but you can use any baking apple you like.

Recipe #252497

From Cook's Illustrated Online.

Recipe #344447

From Cook's Illustrated Online. If using regular yellow onion, add an extra 1/2 tsp sugar. Can be held in an airtight container 24 hrs in the refrigerator.

Recipe #344444

From Cook's Illustrated Online.

Recipe #344443

5 Reviews |  By Mikekey

Diabetic spicy pecans with a little kick! This is just enough cayenne to give that kick. If you like hot and spicy, add more. NOTE: Newer crockpots tend to run at a higher temperature, so you may need to adjust cooking time accordingly!

Recipe #242920

Posted to the SCA_recipes LiveJournal community. This sauce can be stored, tightly bottled, at room temperature for up to 2 days.

Recipe #340247

A substitute for murri naqi, the medieval Arabic fermented barley paste. Recipe courtesy of Duke Cariadoc of the Mists, mka David Friedman.

Recipe #340253

From the Weight Watchers message boards.

Recipe #335978

Adapted from a recipe by Cassi at allrecipes.com. "Served in a clear glass dish, this is a beautiful dip made with a cheese mixture alternating in layers with prepared pesto, and topped with walnuts. It's perfect for the holidays! Serve it with toasted French baguette slices."

Recipe #333427

Adapted from a recipe by Behr at allrecipes.com

Recipe #332973

Adapted from a recipe by J Kenady at www.allrecipes.com. Great served over pan-roasted steaks; use the same pan the steaks were in, and incorporate the meaty juices.

Recipe #332892

Adapted from Diana Rattray at about.com. Add 4-6 tbsp of salt to make "seasoning salt" out of this.

Recipe #332133

From Mom's recipes. Smear this wet rub on beef roasts, pork roasts, or chicken before dry roasting.

Recipe #329118

The classic Jewish fat for use in meat dishes. The clarified fat is called "schmaltz," and the onion and crispy skin bits are called "gribenes." Gribenes are an essential addition to chopped liver and mashed potatoes (for knish or blintz fillings, or just for eating) or scrambled eggs. The water is necessary to keep the onions from burning before the fat melts. Serving size approx 1 tbsp.

Recipe #328209

from "Master Class at Johnson & Wales", episode "Cooking with Peanut Butter" (2006). Serve with satay.

Recipe #327759

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