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    You are in: Home / Cookbooks / Asia ZWT VI
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    15 recipes in

    Asia ZWT VI


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    Soy sauce, sesame oil and rice vinegar make the most wonderful salad dressing with a distinctly Asian flair. Use on any crunchy oriental salad (lettuce, red cabbage, shredded carrots, bean sprouts, radishes, etc.), or any salad period. Particularly tasty on cooked asparagus and spinach too. It's important to use a mild vinegar (such as rice). From an article cut out of the food section of the NY Times.

    Recipe #131649

    No such thing as too many chickpea salads! This was an especially good version I thought, altered a bit with my own and my BF's taste in mind. Extremely easy and no cooking involved, particularly good for lunch at the office or a weekend picnic since it's best at room temperature. If you'd like to make this for a no-cook summer dinner, it's a main meal for two (with a side of green vegetables) or a side dish for four. A Sara Foster recipe from the 4/2007 version of Cottage Living.

    Recipe #220871

    Really nice dressing! One measure of a good home cook is the ability to make your own salad dressing. Or so says Mark Bittman in the food section of the New York Times. This is the orange dressing you sometimes see on your too-cold salad in Japanese restaurants. I made this tonight, and thought it was much better than any other I ever tried at a Japanese restaurant! I made this with half the corn oil, so if you'd like to try the original recipe you can increase amount to 1/4 cup. I did not decrease the sesame oil (but did use regular).

    Recipe #193126

    My niece's version of this classic recipe, it tastes fantastic and is quick and easy! You can also top this with cooked tofu and serve with a vegetable side dish for a healthful vegan dinner:D Adjust heat according to taste, and if you prefer a sweeter taste, swirl in a tablespoon of honey with the tahini and peanut butter.

    Recipe #167899

    Made this recipe as part of the 2006 Zaar World Tour challenge! Had to come up with a low-fat sandwich so I selected peacefulnightdove's recipe #142413. Make her recipe if you are not concerned about fat intake, or make mine if you are. Am posting this in response to a request. Makes a terrific sandwich, and an easy dinner. Cooking time does not include marinating time. Peacefulnightdove recommended 6-8 hours or overnight, but you can probably get away with a few minutes like I did if you use a vegetarian beef substitute.

    Recipe #179162

    This came from the February 11, 2009 edition of the New York Times, describing several immigrants in the area and their weeknight "go-to" staples. Ji Yoon Yoo suggested a Korean savory pancake. A tasty and easy way to use up leftover veggies. If you want, try a little sesame oil in the dipping sauce.

    Recipe #357551

    Superfast veggie dinner or side dish. Courtesy of Mark Bittman, the Minimalist, from the October 1 2009 NY Times. He's not sure whether to call this a warm salad or a room-temperature noodle dish. I love edamame beans, and buying them frozen is fine for this dish. Pick up a bag of pre-washed spinach for this too. Tossing the spinach with the warm noodles and veggies should wilt the spinach, or stir fry them together in a little water to wilt a bit more. Soba noodles are a staple of Japan. They have a slightly firm texture and nutty flavor.

    Recipe #393790

    This looked interesting, and I am posting here for safekeeping. Will update description when I try it. Good thing about it is that it offers substitutes for hard-to-find Asian ingredients. A recipe by Haryumi Kurihara, the "empress of Japanese domesticity" based on an article I cut out of the NY Times.

    Recipe #167612

    Edamame (green soybeans) are one of my favorite beans. The beans, along with the nuts, make this a pretty substantial dish with no need for tofu or meat. The veggies add lots of vitamin A & C. This is mildly flavored, suitable for a family. Add garlic and/or red pepper flakes and/or sesame oil for a stronger taste. Since BF is not fond of broccoli we substituted asparagus. Serve over white or brown rice. From a vegetarian "minute meals" cookbook.

    Recipe #180144

    This looked awfully good, simple, almost perfect! I made this last night and my BF and I were very pleased with the outcome. If possible, use leftover rice as fresh rice will be too moist. Leftover rice from Chinese takeout works well too. After making the dish the amount of garlic didn't seem excessive to me, but use your judgment. Courtesy of Mark Bittman, the minimalist, from today's version of the New York Times. I reduced the oil as it seemed excessive. Use 1/2 cup if you'd prefer. For a vegan dish, omit the eggs. Originally from chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten.

    Recipe #410777

    Found several interesting looking rice salads in the NY Times on July 30, 2008 by Mark Bittman (the minimalist). He says rice salads are among the few salads that don't deteriorate after the dressing is added, so they can be dressed minutes or hours ahead. He recommends that you cook the rice a bit in advance, and dress it before it gets too cold. He also recommends that you cook the rice like a pasta, in abundant salted water (for between 15 and 45 minutes, depending on the rice) and then drain it and dress it when the rice is cool enough to handle. Cooking time is for white rice.

    Recipe #317780

    Found several interesting looking rice salads in the NY Times on July 30, 2008 by Mark Bittman (the minimalist). He says rice salads are among the few salads that don't deteriorate after the dressing is added, so they can be dressed minutes or hours ahead. He recommends that you cook the rice a bit in advance, and dress it before it gets too cold. He also recommends that you cook the rice like a pasta, in abundant salted water (for between 15 and 45 minutes, depending on the rice) and then drain it and dress it when the rice is cool enough to handle. Cooking time is for white rice.

    Recipe #317778

    My own invention of several years ago (or perhaps a combination of other Asian-type recipes I had seen before), scrupulously tested and vetted. I think the sauce is fantastic; it suits my tastes as it is not as sweet as some chinese restaurant sauces and is probably much more healthful, yet it's still spicy and intensely flavorful. If you have a committed carnivore for a spouse, or if you are one, you can substitute real meat for the wheat gluten. I've made it with tofu and soy-based meat substitutes as well.

    Recipe #127522

    Made this for my BF yesterday and he rated it 6 stars. The ingredients and instructions came from the chef at The Market at Newport, a popular cafeteria near where I work that serves excellent food. I supplied the amounts. Do not make this with silken tofu as it will just fall apart. Buy the type of tofu that's packed in water instead. Good as a meat substitute, or snack, or serve it on top of a bed of greens with a bit of rice vinegar or dressing of your choice. It's also really good with balsamic vinegar. *NOTE* - Use a non-stick frying pan, and don't peek at it otherwise it won't get crispy.

    Recipe #213026

    Browned butter is the secret force in Turkish cooking, says Ms. Akin, an expert in Ottoman palace cuisine. This is from a cooking column by Melissa Clark in the 12/5 edition of the New York Times. I reduced the oil and butter (or will as soon as I make this recipe). Use 1 and 4 tablespoons, respectively, if you'd prefer.

    Recipe #274196


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